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Full text of "The Labour gazette January-June 1962"

HANDBOUND 
AT THE 



UNIVERSITY OF 
TORONTO PRESS 



Government 
Publications 



Government 
Publications 



o.c(cL, Icbo^T D«-| 



* 




THE 



LABOUR 
GAZETTE 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY 
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR, CANADA 



Nf. fa 





INDEX 




VOLUME LXII 




FOR THE YEAR 




1962 




Hon. Michael Starr 


Deputy Minister- 


-George V. Haythorne Editor— William S. Drinkwater 






ROGER DUHAMEL, F.R.S.C. 
QUEEN'S PRINTER AND CONTROLLER OF STATIONERY 
OTTAWA, 1963 
68021-5—1 



PAGE NUMBERS OF MONTHLY EDITIONS 

Month 

1- 116 January 

117- 276 February 

277- 392.: March 

393- 496 April 

497- 592 May 

593- 768 June 

769- 904 July 

905-1004 August 

1005-1096 September 

1097-1232 October 

1233-1328 November 

1329-1435 December 



ERRATA 

On page 442 — Column 2 — para. 5 — for "Request for Review under Section 
61 (12) read "Request for Review under Section 61 (2). 
In 1961 issue, (omitted from 1961 index), p. 1024— "Fourth Report, U.K. 
Council on Prices, Productivity and Incomes". 



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888241 



LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 

AFL-CIO — American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations. 

AMC — American Motors Corporation. 

ARTEC — Association of Radio and Television Employees of Canada. 

BBG — Board of Broadcast Governors. 

CB — Conciliation Board. 

CBRT — Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport and General Workers. 

CCC — Canadian Chamber of Commerce. 

CLC — Canadian Labour Congress. 

CNR — Canadian National Railways. 

CNTU — Confederation of National Trade Unions. 

CO — Conciliation Officer. 

CSAC — Civil Service Association of Canada. 

DBS — Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 

IAPA — Industrial Accident Prevention Associations. 

ILO — International Labour Organization. 

IWA — International Woodworkers of America. 

NPC — National Productivity Council. 

NUPSE — National Union of Public Service Employees. 

OECD — Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. 

SIU — Seafarers International Union. 

TUC — Trades Union Congress. 

UAW — United Automobile, Aerospace and Agricultural Implement Workers of 
America, International Union. 



in 



6R021-5— 2 



INDEX 



Accident Prevention See Safety, Industrial 
Accidents, Industrial 

Chief Inspector of Factories. BRITAIN: annual 

report (1960), 225. 
Industrial fatalities. CANADA: (1961), 510. 

first and second quarters (1962), 824, 1117. 

third and fourth quarters (1961), 41, 416. 
Statistics: "H-Industrial Accidents" (quarterly 

and annual feature). 
Work injuries (1961) IAPA. ONTARIO: 498. 

Active Cartage Limited 

Dispute (Local 879, Teamsters) : CO. appointed, 
951; settlement, 1284. 

Adby Construction and Transport Company 
Limited 

Certification application (Adby Employees' Asso- 
ciation) : 1148; granted, 1386. 

Certification application (Local 514, Teamsters): 
unit of truck drivers: 1033; withdrawn, 1149. 

Adby Demolition Company Limited 
Certification application (Adby Employees' Asso- 
ciation) : 1148. 

Adby Employees' Association 

Certification application (Adby Construction and 
Transport Company Limited): 1148; granted, 
1386. 

Certification application (Adby Demolition Com- 
pany Limited): 1148. 

Adult Education 
Adult retraining examined in study prepared 
by Arthur Pigott, Canadian Association for 
Adult Education, for Canadian Conference 
on Education, 503. 

Adult Retraining See Adult Education 

Advisory Committee on Professional Manpower 
meeting, 7th, 11. 

Aged Persons See Older Workers; Social Assist- 
ance 

Aging See Older Workers 

Agreements See Collective Labour Agreements 

Agriculture 

Federal-Provincial Farm Labour Conference, 
18th, 1245. 

National Conference on Agricultural Training, 
1st meeting, 1241. 

Vocational Training Needs in Canadian Agricul- 
ture— bulletin No. 5D, federal Department of 
Labour, 911. 

Agriculture, Department of 
Hamilton, Hon. Alvin, Minister, remarks at 
National Conference on Agricultural Train- 
ing, 1242. 

Air Line Dispatchers' Association, Canadian 
Application for revocation of certification (KLM 
Royal Dutch Airlines): unit of flight dis- 



patchers, Montreal Airport: granted, 1032; 
1033. 
Dispute (KLM Royal Dutch Airlines) : CO. 
appointed, 333; settlement, 533. 

Air Line Flight Attendants' Association, 

Canadian 
Certification application (Trans Air Limited) : 

unit of flight attendants: 1283. 
Dispute (Canadian Pacific Air Lines): CO. 

appointed, 158; settlement, 655. 
Dispute (Pacific Western Airlines Limited) : 

CO. appointed, 1149; C.B. appointed, 1392; 

CB. fully constituted, 1392. 

Airline Pilots' Association, Canadian 

Dispute (Pacific Western Airlines Limited): 

CO. appointed, 836; CB. appointed, 1149. 
Dispute (Trans-Canada Air Lines) : settlement, 

334. 

Alberta Federation of Labour 
Convention, annual, 1358. 
Submits brief to provincial Cabinet, 415. 

Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 
Company 

Certification application (Marine Engineers, 
intervener): unit of marine engineers: re- 
jected, 50. 

Certification application (Marine Engineers' 
Beneficial Association) : unit of marine 
engineers: rejected, 50. 

Dispute (Associated Non-operating Unions) : 
CB. appointed, 533; CB. fully constituted, 
656; CB. report, 1150, 1181; settlement after 
CB. procedure, 1150. 

Dispute (Railroad Trainmen) : CO. appointed, 
1149. 

Allied Building Services Limited 

Certification application (Machinists) : unit of 
building cleaners, Montreal Airport: 332; 
granted, 529. 

American Can Company 

"Sabbaticals", extended vacations, for long- 
service employees in United States, Puerto 
Rico and Canada, 1237. 

American Communications Association 

Dispute (Western Union Telegraph Company. 
Cable Division) : settlement, 334. 

American Federation of Labor-Congress of 
Industrial Organizations 

Building and Construction Trades Department, 
8th legislative conference, 397. 

Convention, biennial, 38. 

Internal Disputes Plan, 1334. 

120 unions sign pledge to eliminate discrimina- 
tion, 1335. 

Seeks 35-hour week, same pay, 1011. 

American Motors Corporation 

AMC-UAW profit-sharing plan, 1333 

American Newspaper Guild 

Certification application (Local 115) (Vantel 
Broadcasting Company Limited) : complaint 
under Section 43 of Act, 53. 



VI 



INDEX 



Dispute (Local 87) (Baton Aldred Rogers 
Broadcasting Limited): CO. appointed, 158; 
settlement, 334. 

Legal decision (Vancouver-New Westminster 
Guild, Local 115): 862. 

Amory, Rt. Hon. The Viscount, British High 
Commissioner to Canada 
Address, Ontario Chapter, Council of Profit 
Sharing Industries, 1238. 

Apprenticeship 

Alta. Apprenticeship Act: regulations, 543, 962, 
1396. 

Alta. Tradesmen's Qualification Act: regula- 
tions, 864, 962. 

Apprenticeship, other employee training pro- 
grams, sponsored by industrial establishments. 
UNITED STATES: 983. 

Apprenticeship Training Agreement. CANADA: 
activities (1961-62) 906. 

Apprenticeship Training Advisory Committee. 
CANADA: meeting, 13th, 299; meeting, 14th, 
1339; report submitted at meeting of Tech- 
nical and Vocational Training Advisory 
Council, 601. 

B.C. Conference on Apprenticeship, 503, 1343. 

Discussed in study prepared for Canadian 
Conference on Education by Director, Cana- 
dian Association for Adult Education, 502. 

Goldenberg Report, recommendations, Ontario 
Royal Commission on Labour-Management 
Relations in the Construction Industry, 783. 

Interim report, National Youth Employment 
Council. BRITAIN: 300. 

Man. Apprenticeship Act: regulations, 731. 

Man. Tradesmen's Qualification Act: proclama- 
tion, 455; regulations, 733. 

National Apprenticeship Act, National Ap- 
prenticeship program, 25th anniversary. 
UNITED STATES: 1008. 

Nfld. Apprenticeship Act: regulations, 865. 

Ont. Apprenticeship Act: regulation, 1051. 

Arbitration 

B.C. Court of Appeal — rules writ of certiorari 
not applicable to arbitrators set up by col- 
lective agreement, 72; upholds order that 
set aside award of arbitration board under 
collective agreement, 856. 

B.C. Federation of Labour convention, report 
of committee of arbitration, 1361. 

B.C. Supreme Court — quashes arbitration award 
because of error of law on face of award. 
541; rules arbitration award on specific ques- 
tion of law can't be set aside, no matter how 
erroneous, 1050; rules employer need not 
prove employee's guilt beyond reasonable 
doubt before discharging him, 221. 

Ont. High Court — dismisses application to 
quash ruling of arbitration board under col- 
lective agreement, 452; quashes arbitration 
decision on ground that board declined to 
exercise its jurisdiction, 959. 

Que. Court of Queen's Bench rules arbitration 
board cannot amend its award once made, 
can only correct simple clerical error, 1047. 

Supreme Court of Canada — upholds power of 
arbitration board to award damages for 
breach of collective agreement, 1184; upholds 



ruling that certiorari not applicable to arbitra- 
tion board under collective agreement, 952. 
U.S. arbitration board sustains management's 
right on lay-off in dispute between Railroad 
Telegraphers and Chicago and North Western 
Railway, 1939. 

Associated Non-operating Unions 

Dispute (Algoma Central and Hudson Bay 
Railway): C.B. appointed, 533; C.B. fully 
constituted, 656; C.B. report, 1181; settlement 
after C.B. procedure, 1150. 

Dispute (Canadian National Railways): C.B. 
appointed, 533; C.B. fully constituted, 656; 
C.B. report, 1181; settlement after C.B. 
procedure, 1150. 

Dispute (Canadian Pacific Railway Company) : 
C.B. appointed, 533; C.B. fully constituted, 
656; C.B. report, 1181; settlement after C.B. 
procedure, 1150. 

Dispute (Midland Railway of Manitoba): C.B. 
appointed, 533; C.B. fully constituted, 656; 
C.B. report, 1181; settlement after C.B. 
procedure, 1150. 

Dispute (Ontario Northland Railway) : C.B. 
appointed, 533; C.B. fully constituted, 656; 
C.B. report, 1181; settlement after C.B. 
procedure, 1150. 

Dispute (Sydney and Louisburg Railway Com- 
pany) : C.B. appointed, 533; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 656; C.B. report, 1181; settlement 
after C.B. procedure, 1150. 

Dispute (Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Rail- 
way Company): C.B. appointed, 533; C.B. 
fully constituted, 656; C.B. report, 1181; 
settlement after C.B. procedure, 1150. 

Atlantic and Gulf Stevedores Limited 

Certification application (Local 375, Longshore- 
men) : rejected, 331. 
Certification application (Local 375, Railway 
and Steamship Clerks, intervener) : rejected, 
331. 

Atlantic Broadcasters Limited 

Certification application (Theatrical Stage Em- 
ployees) : request for review under Section 61 
(2), 53; denied, 157. 

Certification application (Local 848, Theatrical 
Stage Employees): 332; granted, 529. 

Atlantic Television Company Limited 

Certification application (Local 848, Theatrical 
Stage Employees) : 529; representation vote. 
654; rejected. 834. 

Auto Workers 

AMC-UAW profit-sharing plan successful, 1333. 

Certification application (British Overseas Air- 
ways Corporation): unit of employees at 
Toronto International Airport, Malton: 950; 
granted, 1031. 

Certification application (KLM Royal Dutch 
Airlines): rejected, 156. 

Kohler Company of Sheboygan, Wis.: strike 
terminated. 1366. 

Automation 

British Conference on Automation and Com- 
putation, 826. 
CLC, proposed plan. 1010. 



INDEX 



VII 



CNTU, views, 1373. 

Mass unemployment, social unrest, predicted in 

report "Cybernation: The Silent Conquest". 

UNITED STATES: 326. 
President Kennedy's Advisory Committee on 

Labor-Management Policy, conclusion, 324. 
Railway Brotherhoods commend Government 

Action, 413. 
Technological Changes and Skilled Manpower: 

Electronic Data Processing Occupations in 

a Large Insurance Company. Department of 

Labour. CANADA. 15. 



B 



Bacon, H. W., Limited 

Dispute (Local 419, Teamsters) : C.B. report, 
54; settlement, 54. 

Baker, Albert G., Limited 
Dispute (Railway and Steamship Clerks) : CO. 
appointed, 1149; settlement, 1283. 

Bakery and Confectionery Workers' Inter- 
national Union of America 
Legal decisions, 857, 955. 

Barbers and Hairdressers 
Man. Barbers' Act: regulations, 545. 
Man. Hairdressers' Act: regulations, 546. 

Barnhill's Transfer Limited 
Dispute (Locals 76 and 927, Teamsters): C.B. 
report, 210; settlement, 158. 

Baton Aldred Rogers Broadcasting Limited 
Dispute (Local 87, American Newspaper Guild) : 

CO. appointed, 158; settlement, 334. 
Dispute (Local 873, Theatrical Stage Em- 
ployees) : CO. appointed, 655; settlement, 973. 
Dispute (Broadcast Employees): CO. appointed, 
158; settlement, 333; request for review under 
Section 61 (2), 442; 654. 

Baton Broadcasting Limited 
Dispute (Broadcast Employees): CO. appointed, 
158; settlement, 333; request for review under 
Section 61 (2), 442; 654. 

Belgium 

The Working Women of Belgium, 421. 
Blackball Freight Service 
Certification application (Local 885, Teamsters) : 
unit of dockmen and warehousemen: granted, 
1031; (see also p. 950). 

Blackball Transport Incorporated 

Certification application (Local 885, Teamsters) : 
unit of dockmen and warehousemen, 950; 
granted, 1031. 

Blind Persons 

Baker Foundation for Blindness Prevention. 918. 
Blindness Allowances 

Increased payments forecast. CANADA: 120. 

Statistics. CANADA: 397, 773, 1102, 1334. 

BorLERS 

B.C. Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act: regula- 
tions, 79. 
68021-5—3 



Bookbinding 

Canada's oldest bookbinder, Alfred R. Cracknel, 
retires, 597. 

Brandon Packers Limited 
Strike, Brandon Packers Limited, Brandon, 
Man.: report of Mr. Justice G. E. Tritschler, 
4, 123. 

Brandon Union Group 
Brandon Hall Group. CANADA: cites exploita- 
tion in construction industry, 776; group of 
five construction unions reduced to three, 
1236. 

Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron 
Workers' International Association of 
Certification application (Local 720) (Mannix 
Company Limited): 1148, granted, 1386. 

British Columbia Federation of Labour 
Brief to provincial Government, 4. 
Convention, 7th, 1361. 

British Columbia Interior Fruit and Vegetable 
Workers' Union 

Legal decisions, 76, 862. 
British Columbia Telephone Company 

Certification application (Local 344, Electrical 
Workers): unit of telephone operators: 1033; 
withdrawn, 1149. 

Certification application (Federation of Tele- 
phone Workers of British Columbia, inter- 
vener): withdrawn, 1149. 

Dispute (Federation of Telephone Workers of 
British Columbia, traffic and clerical divi- 
sions): CO. appointed, 835; settlement, 951. 

British Columbia Towboat Owners Association 
Dispute (Local 400, Railway, Transport and 

General Workers): CB. appointed, 444; C.B. 

fully constituted, 533; CB. report, 656, 722; 

settlement, 1284. 
Dispute (Local 425, Railway and Transport 

Workers) : CO. appointed, 53; C.B. appointed, 

656; CB. fully constituted, 836; C.B. report, 

1034, 1035; settlement, 1284. 
Dispute (Merchant Service Guild): CO. 

appointed, 53. 
Dispute (Seafarers) : CO. appointed, 444; CB. 

appointed, 656; C.B. fully constituted, 836; 

report of Board, 1150; settlement, 1284. 

British Overseas Airways Corporation 

Certification application (Auto Workers): unit 
of employees at Toronto International Air- 
port; 950; granted, 1031. 

British Productivity Council 
Promotes National Productivity Year, 305. 

British Trades Union Congress See Trades 
Union Congress (Great Britain). 

Broadcast Employees and Technicians, National 

Association of 
Application for revocation of certification (CKSO 

Radio Limited): granted, 949; 951. 
Application for revocation of certification 

(Wally Longul, Brendan Guilfoyle, et al): 

granted, 949; 951. 



INDEX 



Application under Section 19 of Act (CJMS 
Radio Montreal Limitee) : 951; granted, 1032. 

Certification application (Calgary Television 
Limited): 1033; representation vote, 1147; 
granted, 1386. 

Certification application (Canadian Marconi 
Company) : unit of production employees: 
granted, 50. 

Certification application (Channel Seven Tele- 
vision Limited): unit of photographic de- 
partment employees: 333; granted, 529. 

Certification application (CHEK Television 
Limited): 1147; rejected, 1386. 

Certification application (CKSO Radio Limited) : 
unit of television technicians and engineers: 
52; granted, 331. 

Certification application (Transcanada Com- 
munications Limited): 1033; representation 
vote, 1147; rejected, 1386. 

Certification application (Twin City Broadcast- 
ing Company Limited): 1148; granted, 1386. 

Certification application (Western Ontario Broad- 
casting Company, Limited, News and Photo- 
graphic Department): 951; granted, 1031. 

Dispute (Baton Aldred Rogers Broadcasting 
Limited): CO. appointed, 158; settlement, 
333; request for review under Section 61 (2) 
442; 654. 

Dispute (Baton Broadcasting Limited) : CO. 
appointed, 158, settlement, 333; request for 
review under Section 61 (2) 442; 654. 

Dispute (Canadian Marconi Company) : CO. 
appointed, 533; settlement, 655. 

Dispute (CKSO Radio Limited, Sudbury): CO. 
appointed, 836; dispute lapsed, 973. 

Dispute (Kitchener-Waterloo Broadcasting Com- 
pany Limited): CO. appointed, 158; settle- 
ment, 333. 

Dispute (Radio-Laurentides Inc.): CO. ap- 
pointed, 835; settlement, 951. 

Legal decision, 862. 

Broadcasting 

CLC views re CBC, 404. 
CNTU views re BBG, 408. 

Brocklesby, John N., Transport Limited 

Dispute (Local 419, Teamsters) : CO. appointed, 
1283. 

Brown and Ryan Limited 

Certification application (Local 375, Railway 
and Steamship Clerks, intervener) : rejected, 
331. 

Certification application (Local 375, Longshore- 
men) : rejected, 331. 

Building and Construction See Construction 
Industry 

Building Service Employees' International 

Union 
Certification application (Local 506) (Capitol 

Cleaners): unit of building cleaners: 1033; 

granted, 1386. 
Dispute (Local 244) (Burrard Inlet Tunnel and 

Bridge Company): CO. appointed, 1034; 

settlement, 1392. 
Dispute (Locals 204, 183 and 308) (Canadian 

Broadcasting Corporation) : CO. appointed, 

835; settlement, 951. 



Dispute (Local 298) (Canadian Broadcasting 
Corporation): CO. appointed, 835; settle- 
ment, 951. 

Buntain Bell and Company Limited 

Dispute (Labourers): settlement, 973. 
Burrard Inlet Tunnel and Bridge Company 
Dispute (Local 244, Building Service Em- 
ployees): CO. appointed, 1034; settlement, 
1392. 



Calgary Television Limited 
Certification application (Broadcast Employees) : 
1033; representation vote, 1147; granted, 1386. 

Campbell, H. E. 
Retires as Assistant Grand Chief Engineer and 
National Legislative Representative, Brother- 
hood of Locomotive Engineers, and as Secre- 
tary, National Legislative Committee, Inter- 
national Railway Brotherhoods, 1238. 

Campbell, Ian, National Co-ordinator, Civilian 
Rehabilitation, Department of Labour 
Awarded citation United States "People to People 
Program", 1332. 

Canadian Arsenals Limited 

Certification application (Small Arms Division) 
(Operating Engineers) : unit of stationary 
engineers: 52; granted, 155. 

Certification application (Small Arms Division) 
(Steelworkers) : unit of production employees: 
52; representation vote, 155; granted, 331. 

Dispute (Canadian Guards Association) : CO. 
appointed, 533; settlement, 655. 

Dispute (Gun Ammunition Division) (Steel- 
workers): CO. appointed, 333; settlement, 444. 

Dispute (Small Arms Division) (Operating 
Engineers) : CO. appointed, 533; settlement, 
533. 

Dispute (Small Arms Division) (Steelworkers): 
CO. appointed, 835; settlement, 951. 

Canadian Association of Administrators of 
Labour Legislation 
Conference, 21st, 1064. 

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation 

CBC Conference: The Real World of Woman, 
1134. 

CLC, views, 404. 

Citizens' Forum, television programs, 2. 

Dispute (Locals 204, 183 and 308, Building 
Service Employees) : CO. appointed, 835; set- 
tlement, 951. 

Dispute (Local 298, Building Service Employees) : 
CO. appointed, 835; settlement, 951. 

Dispute (Theatrical Stage Employees) : CO. ap- 
pointed, 333; settlement, 444. 

Canadian Chamber of Commerce 
Brief, federal Government, 281. 
CNTU and Chamber's brief to Cabinet, 408. 
Meeting, 33rd, 1114. 

Policy declarations, resolutions, on rehabilitation, 
151. 



INDEX 



IX- 



Canadian Conference on Education 
Conference, 2nd, 399. 
"Education and Employment" — study by Arthur 

Pigott, Director, Canadian Association for 

Adult Education, 501. 
"The Development of Student Potential" — study 

by Dr. Lewis S. Beattie, former Superintendent 

of Secondary Education, Ontario Department 

of Education, 322. 
Voted out of existence, 791. 

Canadian Construction Association 

National Labour Relations Conference, 1333. 
Pre-budget brief to Minister of Finance, 397. 

Canadian Freightways Limited 

Certification application (Local 605, Teamsters) : 
157; withdrawn, 333. 

Certification application (Locals 880, 979, 987, 
181 and 605, Teamsters): unit of employees 
working in and out of Yukon Territory, 
British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, 
Manitoba and Ontario: 442; granted, 653. 

Dispute (Local 605, Teamsters) : CO. appointed, 
53; lapsed, 836. 

Canadian Guards Association 

Dispute (Canadian Arsenals Limited) : CO. ap- 
pointed, 533; settlement, 655. 

Canadian Labour Congress 

Accepts affiliation of Canadian Maritime Union, 
131. 

Automation, plan for meeting, 1010. 

Brief, federal Cabinet, 402. 

Canadian Workers College, 320. 

Chateauneuf, Laurent, assistant director, public 
relations, 134. 

Committee to organize white-collar workers, 396. 

Convention, 4th, 499, 605. 

Convention (1964), 619. 

Dispute (Local 23736) (Upper Lakes Shipping 
Limited) : employees in Grain Elevator Divi- 
sion: settlement, 53. 

Dispute over Newfoundland loggers — special 
committee, 122; proposed settlement, 396; 
report, 608. 

Dodge, William, Executive Vice-President: ad- 
dress to meeting, Canadian Chamber of Com- 
merce, 1114; remarks at convention, Alberta 
Federation of Labour, 1359. 

Jodoin, Claude, President: address, Newfound- 
land Federation of Labour, 910; Ontario 
Federation of Labour, 1357; answer to Gov- 
ernment's reply, CLC brief, 407; Labour Day 
message, 913; message, CNTU, 1376; National 
Productivity Council, resignation, 1113; New 
Year message, 1337; opening speech, conven- 
tion, 610. 

MacDonald, Donald, Secretary-Treasurer: speaks 
to CNE Board of Directors, 1108; to fourth 
constitutional convention, 618; to Nova Scotia 
Federation of Labour, 1119. 

Membership, 1237. 

Morris, Joe, Executive Vice-President: remarks, 
New Brunswick Federation of Labour, 1360; 
convention, Saskatchewan Federation of 
Labour, 1365. 

Swerdlow, Max, Director of Education: remarks, 
Alberta Federation of Labour convention, 
1359. 
68021-5—31 



Union Label Trades Department, convention, 

620. 
The CLC and the Government — brief to federal 

Cabinet, 405. 

Canadian Manufacturers' Association 
Industrial Relations Conference, 811. 
Meeting, 91st, 808. 
Public Relations Conference, 823. 
Taxation Conference, 823. 

Canadian Marconi Company 

Certification application (Broadcast Employees) : 
unit of production employees: granted, 50. 

Certification application (Marconi Salaried Em- 
ployees Association, Intervener): unit of pro- 
duction employees: granted, 50. 

Certification application (Theatrical Stage Em- 
ployees) : unit of production employees: 
granted, 50. 

Dispute (Broadcast Employees) : CO. appointed, 
533; settlement, 655. 

Canadian Maritime Union 

Affiliation, CLC, 131. 

Certification application (Canadian Pacific Rail- 
way Company) : unit of unlicensed personnel 
on S.S. Keewatin and S.S. Assiniboia: 52; 
granted, 155; request for review under Section 
61 (2) of Act, 834; request granted, new 
certificate issued, 949. 

Certification application (Owen Sound Trans- 
portation Company Limited) : unit of un- 
licensed personnel on M.S. Normac, S.S. 
Norgoma and S.S. Norisle: 52; rejected, 156. 

Certification application (Trans-Lake Shipping 
Limited) : unit of unlicensed personnel on 
S.S. Hilda Marianne: 52; granted, 155. 

Canadian National Hotels 

Dispute (Chateau Laurier Hotel, Ottawa) (Rail- 
way, Transport and General Workers) : CO. 
appointed, 1392. 

Dispute (MacDonald Hotel, Edmonton) (Local 
857, Operating Engineers) : CO. appointed, 
1283; settlement, 1392. 

Canadian National Railways 

Agreement, CNR-CBRT, merges seniority lists 
at Lakehead, 911. 

Certification application (Commercial Teleg- 
raphers) : unit of diesel mechanics, Tele- 
communications Department) : 157; with- 
drawn, 333; 442; granted, 653. 

Certification application (Railway and Steam- 
ship Clerks) : unit of highway drivers, New- 
foundland: 332; granted, 529. 

Certification application (Railway, Transport 
and General Workers) : system- wide unit of 
employees, various manual and clerical classi- 
fications: 1033. 

Dispute (Associated Non-operating Unions): 
CB. appointed, 533; CB. fully constituted, 
656; CB. report, 1181; settlement after 
CB. procedure, 1150. 

Dispute (Railroad Trainmen): CB. report, 656; 
settlement, 836. 

Dispute (Railway, Transport and General 
Workers): CO. appointed, 533; settlement, 
655. 



INDEX 



Canadian National Railways (Atlantic, Cen- 
tral and Western Regions) 
Dispute (Locomotive Engineers): C.B. report, 
159; settlement, 534. 

Canadian National Railways (Atlantic, St. 
Lawrence, Great Lakes, Mountain and 
Prairie Regions and including Newfound- 
land District) 
Dispute (Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen): 
C.B. report, 538; settlement, 534. 

Canadian National Steamship Company Limited 
Dispute (Railway, Transport and General Work- 
ers): pursers and radio telegraph operators: 
CO. appointed, 333; settlement, 655. 
Dispute (Railway, Transport and General Work- 
ers) : (Steward's Department) : CO. appointed, 
333; settlement, 655. 
Dispute (Seafarers): C.B. appointed, 158; C.B. 
fully constituted, 334; C.B. report, 535; settle- 
ment, 973. 

Canadian Pacific Air Lines Limited 
Dispute (Airline Flight Attendants): CO. ap- 
pointed, 158; settlement, 655. 
Dispute (Local 28 Hotel and Restaurant Em- 
ployees) : CO. appointed, 1034. 
Dispute (Railroad Telegraphers): CO. ap- 
pointed, 333; settlement, 533. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company 

Certification application (Railway and Steam- 
ship Clerks): unit of clerks in Regional 
Accounting office, Merchandise Services, Win- 
nipeg: granted, 949; 950. 

Dispute (Associated Non-operating Unions): 
C.B. appointed, 533; CB. fully constituted, 
656; C.B. report, 1181; settlement after 
C.B. procedure, 1150. 

Dispute (Merchandise Services Department) : 
(Railway and Steamship Clerks) : settlement, 
53. 

Dispute (Seafarers) (S.S. Princess Helene): 
CO. appointed, 951. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company (Atlantic, 
Eastern, Prairie and Pacific Regions) 
Dispute (Railroad Trainmen): C.B. report, 
1152; settlement after mediation after Board 
procedure, 1415. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company (Atlantic, 
Eastern, Prairie and Pacific Regions and 
Quebec Central Railway Company) 
Dispute (Locomotive Engineers) : C.B. report, 
180; settlement, 534. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company (Atlantic, 
Eastern, Prairie and Pacific Regions in- 
cluding Quebec Central Railway Company 
and Dominion Atlantic Railway Company) 

Dispute (Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen) : 
C.B. report, 850. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company (Great 

Lakes Steamships) 

Certification application (Canadian Maritime 

Union) : unit of unlicensed personnel on 

S. S. Keewatin and S. S. Assiniboia: 52; 



granted, 155; request for review under Section 
61 (2) of Act, 834; request granted and 
new certificate issued, 949. 
Certification application (Seafarers, Intervener): 
unit of unlicensed employees aboard S.S. 
Keewatin and S. S. Assiniboia: granted, 155. 

Canadian Pacific Steamships, Limited 

Certification application (Local 375, Railway and 

Steamship Clerks) : rejected, 331. 
Certification application (Local 375, Longshore- 
men): rejected, 331. 

Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment No. I 
Summary of decisions — Case Nos. 766-780, 211; 
781-787, 852; 788-792, 1036; 793-795, 1286. 
Canadian Sickness Survey 

Report, 242. 
Canadian Stevedoring Company Limited 
Certification application (Local 501, Longshore- 
men and Warehousemen): unit of Waterboys: 
949; granted, 949. 

Canadian Workers College 

Established in joint undertaking by CLC, CNTU, 
McGill University and University of Mont- 
real, 320. 
Cape Breton Broadcasters Limited 

Dispute (Theatrical Stage Employees) : CO. 
appointed, 1149; settlement, 1283. 
Capitol Cleaners 

Certification application (Local 506, Building 
Cleaners): unit of building cleaners: 1033; 
granted, 1386. 
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United 
Brotherhood of 

CLC special committee investigates Carpenters- 
IWA dispute (Newfoundland loggers) 122; 
proposed settlement, 396; convention report, 
608. 

Certification application (Local 2499) (General 
Enterprises Limited): unit of carpenters: 
granted, 50. 

Dispute (Local 2499) (General Enterprises 
Limited): CO. appointed, 333; lapsed, 836. 

Walkout of Carpenter delegation, CLC conven- 
tion, 499. 
Cates, C. H., and Sons 

Dispute (Seafarers) : C.B. appointed, 656; C.B. 
fully constituted, 836; CB. report, 1150; settle- 
ment, 1284. 
Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

Certification application (Local 13946, Mine 
Workers) : unit of janitors and maintenance 
men, St. Michel Terrace Housing Project): 
granted, 1031; 1033. 
Certification See also Industrial Relations 

B.C. Court of Appeal — quashes Labour Rela- 
tions Board's substitution of bargaining agent 
by varying certification order, 859; upholds 
judgment quashing certification order because 
employer kept from making representation, 
857. 

B.C. Supreme Court refuses to quash certifica- 
tion order when complaint based mainly on 
procedural grounds, 76. 



INDEX 



XI 



McKinnon report, recommendations. NOVA 

SCOTIA. 508. 
Nfld. Federation of Labour, views, 910. 
N.S. Supreme Court quashes certification order 

for province-wide bargaining unit; application 

covered smaller unit, 448. 
Ont. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1252. 
P.E.I. Industrial Relations Act: regulations, 1258. 
Sask. Court of Queen's Bench rules employees 

can exercise right to make an application for 

decertification at any time, 345. 
Supreme Court of Canada restores B.C. Labour 

Relations Board's decision refusing to certify 

craft units in lumber industry, 344. 

Channel Seven Television Limited 

Certification application (Broadcast Employees) : 
unit of photographic department employees: 
333; granted, 529. 

Charities See Public Charities 
Check-off See also Union Dues 

CLC recommendation, 404. 

P.E.I. Industrial Relations Act: regulations, 1257. 

Chek Television Limited 

Certification application (Broadcast Employees) : 
1147; rejected, 1386. 

Chemical Industries 

ILO Chemical Industries Committee, sixth ses- 
sion, 651. 

Citations 
National Co-ordinator, Civilian Rehabilitation, 
awarded U.S. citation "People to People 
Program". CANADA: 1332. 

Citizens' Forum 

CBC program, 2. 
Civil Rights 

AFL-CIO, views, 39. 
Civil Service Association of Canada 

Certification application (National Harbours 
Board) : unit of sergeants and con- 
stables, harbour police force, Quebec City: 
granted, 50. 

Dispute (National Harbours Board) (Prescott): 
CO. appointed, 835; settlement, 951. 

Dispute (National Harbours Board): unit of 
sergeants and constables, harbour police force, 
Quebec City: CO. appointed, 655; settlement, 
1034. 

Civil Service Federation of Canada 

Canadian Postal Employees' Association (CLC), 
disaffiliates, 1118. 

Civilian Rehabilitation See Rehabilitation 
CJMS Radio Montreal Limitee 

Application under Section 19 of Act: (Broadcast 
Employees): 951; granted, 1032. 

CKSO Radio Limited 

Application for revocation of certification: 

(Broadcast Employees): granted, 949; 951. 
Certification application (Broadcast Employees) : 

unit of television technicians and engineers: 

52; granted, 331. 
Dispute (Broadcast Employees) : CO. appointed, 

836; dispute lapsed, 973. 



Clarke Steamship Company Limited 

Dispute (Railway and Steamship Clerks): CO. 
appointed, 1149; settlement, 1283. 

Cliff, M. R. 
Dispute (Seafarers) : CB. appointed, 656; CB. 
fully constituted, 836; CB. report, 1150; settle- 
ment, 1284. 

Coal Mining See Mining 
Coast Cargo Services Limited 

Certification application (Railway, Transport and 

General Workers) : withdrawn, 443. 
Certification application (Seafarers, intervener) : 
withdrawn, 443. 

Coastwise Pier Limited 

Certification application (Local 501, Longshore- 
men and Warehousemen) : unit of dock and 
shed employees and equipment operators: 530; 
withdrawn, 655. 

Certification application (new) (Local 501, Long- 
shoremen and Warehousemen) : unit of dock 
and shed employees: 655; representation vote, 
949; granted, 1031. 

Collective Bargaining See also Industrial Re- 
lations; Legal Decisions 

CLC, views, 607. 

Collective bargaining can't solve technological 
unemployment — article by Industrial Union 
Department (AFL-CIO), 1009. 

Collective Bargaining Review. CANADA: 
(monthly feature). 

Ont. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1253. 

Wage increases obtained by collective bargaining, 
first half 1962. UNITED STATES: 1034. 

Collective Labour Agreements 

Agreement signed, Queen Elizabeth Hotel, Mont- 
real, and Local 382, Hotel and Restaurant 
Employees, 241. 

B.C. Court of Appeal — rules that writ of 
certiorari not applicable to arbitrators set up 
by collective agreement, 72; upholds order 
that set aside award of arbitration board under 
collective agreement, 856. 

Consolidated CNR-CBRT agreement, Lakehead. 
ONTARIO: 911. 

Extended vacations ("sabbaticals") for long- 
service employees — American Can Company, 
Continental Can Company in United States, 
Puerto Rico and Canada, 1237. 

Major settlements, 1961. CANADA: 146. 

Manitoba Court of Queen's Bench rules that 
a trade union in Manitoba has no legal status 
to obtain mandamus order from court, 955. 

McKinnon report, recommendations. NOVA 
SCOTIA: 508. 

Ont. High Court — dismisses application to quash 
ruling of an arbitration board under collec- 
tive agreement, 452; upholds validity of union 
dues agreement that was collateral to col- 
lective agreement in force, 450. 

Progress toward shorter work week, Canada 
and United States, 289, 291. 

Que. Collective Agreement Act: amendments, 
1256. 

Que. Superior Court upholds constitutionality of 
the 1960 amendments to Collective Agreement 
Act re hours of labour, 1188. 



XII 



INDEX 



Supreme Court of Canada — upholds power of 
arbitration board to award damages for a 
breach of a collective agreement, 1184; up- 
holds ruling that certiorari not applicable 
to arbitration board under collective agree- 
ment, 952. 

Two-year agreement, Steelworkers, 11 major 
steel firms. UNITED STATES: 499. 

Colombo Plan 

Canada and the Colombo Plan — activities, con- 
tributions, etc., 130. 

Colombo Plan Technical Assistance Program — 
expansion, 130. 

Commercial Cable Company 

Dispute (Seafarers) : unlicensed personnel — 
licensed engineers on S.S. Cable Guardian: 
C.B. report, 54, 57. 

Commercial Telegraphers' Union 

Certification application (Telecommunications 
Department, Canadian National Railways) : 
unit of diesel mechanics: 157; withdrawn, 333. 

Certification application (Telecommunications 
Department, Canadian National Railways) : 
unit of diesel mechanics: 442; granted, 653. 

Commonwealth Scholarship and Fellowship 
Plan 
Canada offers 125 scholarships, 4. 

Commonwealth Study Conference 

Duke of Edinburgh's second Conference, 772, 

915. 
Opens May 13, Montreal, 396. 

Communications Workers of America 

Certification application (Toronto Harbour Com- 
missioners): unit of berthing masters: 1033; 
withdrawn, 1148. 

Computation 

British Conference on Automation and Com- 
putation, 826. 

Conciliation 

Canadian railways and 17 unions of non- 
operating employees accept board's recom- 
mendations, 1008. 

Man. Federation of Labour — views re appoint- 
ment of judges as chairmen, of conciliation 
boards, 1363. 

McKinnon report, recommendations. NOVA 
SCOTIA: 509. 

Ont. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1253. 

P.E.I. Industrial Relations Act: regulations, 1259. 

Confederation of National Trade Unions 

Bergeron, Marius, Research Director, appointed 
to Quebec Labour Relations Board, 1102. 

Brief, federal Cabinet, 407. 

Brief, Quebec Government, 281. 

Canadian Workers' College, participation, 320. 

Convention, 40th, 1372. 

Convention, special, 32. 

Crest, new. 33. 

Marchand, Jean, General President: brief to 
federal Cabinet, 407, answer to Government's 
reply, 410; Labour Day message, 914; New 
Year message, 1338; report to 40th convention, 



1373, 1375; report at special convention, 32, 
moral report, 34. 
report, 34. 
Membership, 1237. 

Conference on Education See Canadian Con- 
ference on Education 

consolroated aviation fueling and services 
Limited 
Application for revocation (Machinists) : re- 
jected, 51. 

Construction Industry 

Brandon Hall group, unions. CANADA: 776, 

1236. 
Goldenberg Report — recommendations, Ontario 

Royal Commission on Labour-Management 

Relations in the Construction Industry, 775. 
Man. Building Trades Protection Act (now 

Construction Safety Act): amendments, 1351. 
Ont. Construction Hoists Act: amendment, 1350. 
Ont. Construction Safety Act: regulations, 1052; 

1961-62 provisions, 1349. 
Ont. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1252. 

Continental Can Company 
Extended vacations ("sabbaticals") for long- 
service employees, United States, Puerto Rico 
and Canada, 1237. 

Co-Ordinated Bargaining See Collective Bar- 
gaining 

Corporation Profits 

Corporation profits decrease, DBS report, 1009. 
Corporations and Labour Unions Return Act 

CLC, recommendations, 404. 

CNTU, views, 409. 

Provisions, 1346. 

Cost of Living 

"Prices and the Cost of Living" (monthly 
feature) CANADA. 

Council of Profit Sharing Industries 

Address, Rt. Hon. the Viscount Amory, British 
High Commissioner, to Ontario Chapter of the 
Council of Profit Sharing Industries, 1238. 

Criminal Code 

CLC recommendation re "mischief" picketing, 
404. 

Cullen Stevedoring Company Limited 

Certification application (Local 375, Longshore- 
men): rejected, 331. 
Certification application (Local 375, Railway 
and Steamship Clerks, intervener) : rejected, 
331. 

Cunard Steamship Company Limited 

Certification application (Local 375, Longshore- 
men) : rejected, 331. 
Certification application (Local 375, Railway 
and Steamship Clerks, intervener) : rejected, 
331. 

Currie, J. Howard, Director, Government Em- 
ployees Compensation Branch, Department of 
Labour 
Appointment, 1238. 

Cybernation See Automation 



INDEX 



XIII 



D 



Davie Transportation Limited 

Dispute (Seafarers): C.B. report, 334, 338. 
De Luxe Transportation Limited 
Certification application (Local 419, Teamsters) : 
unit of garage employees: granted, 949; 
950. 
Dispute (Local 419, Teamsters) : CO. appointed, 
1283. 

Decertification 
Nfld. Federation of Labour, views, 910. 
Ont. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1252. 
P.E.I. Industrial Relations Act: regulations, 
1258. 

Deeks-McBride Limited 
Certification application (Railway, Transport 

and General Workers): marine engineers: 834; 

granted, 949. 
Dispute (Seafarers) : C.B. appointed, 656; C.B. 

fully constituted, 836; C.B. report, 1150; 

settlement, 1284. 

Dependants' Allowances 
Nfld. Dependants' Allowances (Repeal) Act 
(1961), 783. 

Dependent Children See Social Assistance 

Dependent Families See Social Assistance 

DeYoung, George, Chairman, National Produc- 
tivity Council 
Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, 
address, 1109. 

Disabled Persons 

Architectural barriers to handicapped — study by 
American organizations assists Canadian 
organizations, 419. 

CCC, recommendations, 151. 

National Advisory Council on the Rehabilitation 
of Disabled Persons — appointment, 498; meet- 
ing, 1st, 602. 

Number of persons rehabilitated in 1961-62. 
CANADA: 1006. 

Sheltered employment. CANADA: 1023. 

"Unlimited Skills Inc." CANADA: 327. 

Vocational Training of Disabled Persons Act. 
CANADA: proclamation, 43; federal-provin- 
cial officials "chart" future of program, 498, 
524. 

Disabled Persons Allowances 

Increase in payments forecast. CANADA: 120. 
Statistics. CANADA: 397, 773, 1102, 1334. 

Discrimination See also Unpad* Labour 
Practices 

Appointments, promotions, in Government serv- 
ice, to be made without regard to sex. 
UNITED STATES: 1272. 

Canadian legislation on women's work compared 
with ILO standards, 526. 

Job discrimination in Ontario, 596. 

Measures to combat discrimination — proceedings 
of 150th session, ILO Governing Body, 48. 

Ont. Human Rights Code: regulations, 1056, 
1264. 



Pledge of AFL-CIO unions to eliminate discrim- 
ination, 1335. 

Text of ILO convention concerning basic aims 
and standards of social policy — non-discrim- 
ination on grounds of race, colour, sex, 
belief, tribal association or trade union 
affiliation, 935. 

Doctors See Professional Manpower 

Dodge, William, Executive Vice-President, Cana- 
dian Labour Congress 

CCC, addresses meeting, 1114. 

Alta. Federation of Labour convention, remarks, 
1359. 

Dominion Atlantic Railway Company See 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company 

Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation 
Certification application (Marine Engineers, 

intervener) unit of marine engineers: rejected, 

50. 
Certification application (Marine Engineers 

Beneficial Association) : unit of marine 

engineers: rejected, 50. 
Dispute (Seafarers) : C.B. fully constituted, 54; 

C.B. report, 727; settlement, 1284. 

Douglas, H.R. (et al) 
Application for revocation of certification 
(Machinists): 951; rejected, 1032. 

Duquette, Joseph A.R. 

Senior conciliation officer, federal Department 
of Labour, death of, 596. 



E 



Eagle Shipping and Investment Company 
Limited 
Certification application (Seafarers): withdrawn, 

53. 

Earnings See Wages and Salardzs 
East-West Transport Limited 

Certification application (Local 979, Teamsters) : 
granted, 155. 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company Limited 
Certification application (Local 375, Longshore- 
men): rejected, 331. 
Certification application (Local 375, Railway 
and Steamship Clerks, intervener) : rejected, 
331. 

Eastern Provincial Airways, Limited 
Certification application (Machinists) : unit of 
maintenance employees: granted, 1031; 1033. 

Economic Policy 
CCC, views, 281. 

CLC, Committee on Economic Policy, 614. 
CLC, views, 402. 
CNTU, views, 407. 
European Economic Community Council, move 

to enforce equal pay, 122. 
Organization for Economic Co-operation and 

Development, Canada represented, 774. 
Throne Speech predicts move to spur economic 

growth, 1100. 



XIV 



INDEX 



Education See also Adult Education; Canadian 
Conference on Education; Older Workers; 
Workers' Education 

CLC, recommendations, 404; views, 617. 

Equal pay for women on faculty endorsed by 
university presidents. CANADA: 243. 

ILO convention concerning basic aims and 
standards of social policy — education, train- 
ing, 935. 

International Northern Great Plains Conference 
on Special Education and Rehabilitation, 1132. 

President Kennedy's Advisory Committee on 
Labour-Management Policy, 325. 

Que. Federation of Labour, views, 137. 

Railway Brotherhoods, views, 411. 

Scholarships under Commonwealth and Fellow- 
ship Plan. CANADA: 4. 

Technical education abroad — C. R. Ford, fed- 
eral Department of Labour, 504. 

Technical education for rural industries — 
Technical and Vocational Training Advisory 
Council. CANADA: 600. 

TUC report to Government's Committee on 
Higher Education. BRITAIN: 121. 

Elections 

CNTU, views re election expenses, 409. 

Electrical Installations 

Man. Electricians' Licence Act: amendments. 
1352. 

Electrical Workers (IBEW) 

Certification application (Local 344) (British 
Columbia Telephone Company) : unit of tele- 
phone operators: 1033. 

Legal decision, 1050. 

Electrical Workers (UE) 

Legal decision, 452. 
Electronic Data Processing 

Effect on clerical employment, Dr. John C. 
McDonald, federal Department of Labour, 
326. 

Technological Changes and Skilled Manpower: 
Electronic Data Processing Occupations in a 
Large Insurance Company — federal Depart- 
ment of Labour, 15. 

Electronics 

Electrical and Electronic Occupations— federal 
Department of Labour, 1011. 
Elevators 

Alta. Elevators and Fixed Conveyances Act: 

regulations, 1051, 1354. 
Ont. Elevators and Lifts Act: amendments, 1350. 

Emergency Manpower Planning See Manpower 
Planning 

Empire Freightways Limited 

Certification application (Railway, Transport 
and General Workers): 157; granted, 331. 
Empire Stevedoring Company Limited 

Certification application (Local 375, Longshore- 
men): rejected, 331. 
Certification application (Local 375, Railway and 
Steamship Clerks, intervener): rejected, 331. 
Employee Training See Training 



Employment See also Canadian Conference on 
Education 

B.C. Federation of Labour, views, 4. 

Employment and Earnings in the Scientific and 
Technical Professions, 1958-1961 — federal De- 
partment of Labour, 1308. 

Employment in Canada in 1961, 5. 

Employment Review: Employment and Unem- 
ployment. CANADA: (monthly feature). 

Employment Review: Manpower Situation. 
CANADA: first, second and third quarters 
(1962), 425, 793, 1121; fourth quarter (1961), 
17. 

Employment outlook, university graduates. 
CANADA: 280. 

Hon. Michael Starr, federal Minister of Labour, 
comments at Garment Workers' banquet, 280. 

National Employment Committee, meeting, 81st. 
CANADA: 1195. 

New doctors and masters find employment in 
Canada, 1101. 

Ont. Employment Agencies Act: regulations, 
1399. 

Organization for Economic Co-operation and 
Development — Seminar on Age and Employ- 
ment, 919. 

Preparation of Girls for Employment — Women's 
Bureau, federal Department of Labour, 394. 

Statistics: "C-Employment, Hours and Earnings' 
(monthly feature). "D-National Employment 
Service Statistics" (monthly feature). 

The Economy of the Atlantic Region in Perspec- 
tive, 308. 

United States Commission on Status of Women, 
3. 

United States Committee on Youth Employment, 
3; first report, 236. 

United States Presidential Committee on Equal 
Employment Opportunity, 1335. 

Employment Conditions See Labour Conditions 
Employment Security 

IAPES, convention, 49th, 1130. 

Employment Service See National Employment 
Service 

Employment Standards See Labour Standards 

Engineers 
The Goldenberg Report — recommendations, On- 
tario Royal Commission on Labour-Manage- 
ment Relations in the Construction Industry, 
777. 

Equal Pay for Equal Work 

Canadian legislation on women's work, com- 
parison with ILO standards, 526. 

Danish Confederation of Trade Unions, principle 
adopted, 152. 

Equal pay for equal work in Civil Service. SIN- 
GAPORE: 1272. 

Equal pay for women on faculty endorsed by 
university presidents. CANADA: 243. 

European Economic Community Council, equal 
pay enforcement, 122. 

Ont. Human Rights Code: regulations, 1056. 

Ethics See Raiding 
European Common Market 

B.C. Federation of Labour, views, 1362. 

Man. Federation of Labour, views, 1363. 



INDEX 



xv 



European Economic Community Council 
Council moves to enforce equal pay, 122. 
Examinations See Labour Standards 



Factories 

Alta. Factories Act: repeal, 1354. 

B.C. Factories Act: proclamation re public holi- 
day, 80; regulation, 865. 

B.C. Municipal Act: regulation, 865. 

Chief Inspector of Factories. BRITAIN: annual 
report (1960), 225. 

Man. Employment Standards Act: provisions, 
1352. 

Man. Shops Regulation Act: repeal of Part II, 
1352. 

N.B. Factory Act: amendments, 1353; title 
changed to Industrial Safety Act, 1353. 

Ont. Federation of Labour, views re transfer of 
plants, 1355. 

Fair Accommodation Practices See Discrimina- 
tion 

Fair Employment Practices See Discrimination 

Fair Labour Standards See Labour Standards 

Fair Wages See also Labour Conditions 

CLC, recommendation, 404. 

Man. Fair Wage Act: regulations, 732. 

Faraday Uranium Mines Limited 

Dispute (Local 1006, Mine, Mill and Smelter 
Workers): CO. appointed, 1392. 

Farm Labour 
Federal-Provincial Farm Labour Conference, 
18th, 1245. 

Farm Productivity See Productivity 

Federal Commerce and Navigation Company 
Limited 

Dispute (Seafarers): C.B. report, 66. 
Federal-Provincial Farm Labour Conference 

18th Conference, 1245. 

Federation of Telephone Workers of British 
Columbia 
Intervener, certification application (British 
Columbia Telephone Company) : unit of tele- 
phone operators: withdrawn, 1149. 
Fire Prevention 

Alta. Fire Prevention Act: regulations governing 
homes for aged, 791. 

Fishing 
N.S. Federation of Labour, recommendations, 
415. 

Forced Labour 

Complaints concerning forced labour — proceed- 
ings of 150th session, ILO Governing Body, 

48. 

Ford, C.R., Director, Technical and Vocational 
Training Branch, Department of Labour 
Address on Technical Education Abroad, 2nd 
Canadian Conference on Education, 504. 
68021-5—4 



Report to meeting, National Technical and 
Vocational Training Advisory Council, 601. 

Forestry 

Que. Minimum Wage Act: orders, 734, 1057. 
Frontenac Broadcasting Company Limited 
Certification application (Theatrical Stage Em- 
ployees) : application for revocation received, 
655; granted, 834. 
Dispute (Theatrical Stage Employees): C.B. 
fully constituted, 53; C.B. report, 335. 

Fuel 

Ont. Energy Act: amendments, 455, 734; regula- 
tions, 1292. 

Furness Withy and Company Limited 

Certification application (Local 375, Longshore- 
men) : rejected, 331. 
Certification application (Local 375, Railway 
and Steamship Clerks intervener): rejected. 
331. 



Gas, Natural 

Alta. Gas Protection Act: amendments, 78; new 
orders, 962, 1051. 

B.C. Gas Act: regulations, 80. 

Ont. Energy Act: amendments, 455, 734; new 
regulations, 1292. 

Sask. Gas Inspection and Licensing Act: order, 
1057. 

Sask. Oil and Gas Conservation Act: regula- 
tions, 353. 
Gaspe Shipping Registered 

Certification application (Railway and Steam- 
ship Clerks) : unit of longshoremen: granted, 
50. 

Dispute (Railway and Steamship Clerks): CO. 
appointed, 1149; settlement, 1283. 

General Assistance See Social Assistance 
General Enterprises Limited 

Certification application (Local 2499, Carpen- 
ters) : unit of carpenters, granted, 50. 
Dispute (Local 2499, Carpenters): CO. ap- 
pointed, 333; lapsed, 836. 

Giant Yellowknife Mines Limited 

Dispute (Local 802, Mine, Mill and Smelter 
Workers): CO. appointed, 533; settlement, 
655. 
Gibbons, A. R., International Railway Brother- 
hoods: 
Appointment, Secretary, National Legislative 
Committee, 1238. 
Gill Interprovincial Lines Limited 

Certification application (Local 605, Teamsters) : 
unit of employees, including owner-drivers: 
157; granted, 529; reasons for judgment, 531. 
Dispute (Local 31, Teamsters): CO. ap- 
pointed, 1283. 
Dispute (Local 605, Teamsters) : settlement, 53. 
Goodrich, B. F., Canada Limited 

Dr. R. V. Yohe, President, addresses Business 
Newspapers Association, 1110. 



XVI 



INDEX 



Gormley, J. A. (Stevedoring Service) 

Dispute (Labourers' Protective Union): settle- 
ment, 973. 

GOSSETT AND SONS TRANSPORT LIMITED 

Certification application (Local 987, Teamsters) : 
157; granted, 529. 

Government Employees Compensation Branch 
{Federal Department of Labour) 

Functions, 1234. 

Currie, J. H., Director, 1238. 

Greene, George G., retirement, 1239. 

Government of Canada 

The CLC and the Government — relationship 
discussed in brief to Federal Cabinet, 405. 

Grain Workers' Union 

Certification application (Local 333, intervener) 
(United Grain Growers Limited) : request for 
review under Section 61 (2) denied, 52. 

Greene, George G. 

Retirement as Director, Government Employees 
Compensation Branch, 1239. 

Grievance Procedure 

P.E.I. Industrial Relations Act: regulations, 1258. 

Gross National Product See National Product 

Guilfoyle, Brendan (et al) 

Application for revocation of certification 
(Broadcast Employees) : granted, 949; 951. 

Gulf of Georgia Towing 

Dispute (Seafarers) : C.B. appointed, 656; C.B. 
fully constituted, 836; C.B. report, 1150; 
settlement, 1284. 



H 



Hairdressers See Barbers and Hairdressers 

Hall Corporation of Canada 

Certification application (Marine Engineers, 
intervener): unit of marine engineers: re- 
jected, 50. 

Certification application (Marine Engineers 
Beneficial Association) : unit of marine engin- 
eers: rejected, 50. 

Hamilton, Hon. Alvin, Minister of Agriculture 
National Conference on Agricultural Training, 
remarks, 1242. 

Handicapped Persons See Disabled Persons; Dis- 
abled Persons Allowances 

Hanson Transport Company Limited 

Dispute (Local 938, Teamsters) : CO. appointed, 
951; C.B. appointed, 1149; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 1149. 

Harbour Services 

Dispute (Seafarers): C.B. appointed, 656; C.B. 
fully constituted, 836; C.B. report, 1150; settle- 
ment, 1284. 



Haythorne, George V., Deputy Minister, federal 

Department of Labour 
Addresses, remarks, etc — 

Apprenticeship Training Advisory Committee, 
300. 

International Labour Conference, 46th Ses- 
sion, 830. 

Labour-Management Committee Conference, 
1st, 304. 

McGill University's 14th industrial relations 
conference, 623. 

National Advisory Council on the Rehabilita- 
tion of Disabled Persons, 602. 

National Apprenticeship Training Advisory 
Committee, meeting, 14th, 1339. 

National Technical and Vocational Training 
Advisory Council, meeting, 3rd, 598. 

Preparation of girls and women for employ- 
ment, meeting on, 394. 

Hazardous Occupations 

Fair Labor Standards Act. UNITED STATES: 
Hazardous Occupations Order No. 16, 456. 

Health 

Canadian legislation on women's work com- 
pared with ILO standards, 526. 

Health, Industrial 

Canadian Sickness Survey, 242. 

Chief Inspector of Factories. BRITAIN: an- 
nual report (1960), 229. 

Legislation enacted in 1962. CANADA, 1349. 

N.B. Logging Camps Act: provisions, 1353. 

Nfld. Federation of Labour, views, 910. 

Nfld. Health and Public Welfare Act: amend- 
ment, 1354. 

N.S. Public Health Act: provisions, 1354. 

Railway Brotherhoods, views re health of and 
sanitation facilities for railway employees, 413. 

Health Insurance See Insurance, Health 

Hector Broadcasting Company Limited 

Dispute (Local 848, Theatrical Stage Employ- 
ees): CO. appointed, 158; settlement, 333. 

Hill the Mover (Canada) Limited 

Certification application (Local 879, Teamsters) : 

unit of employees at North Stoney Creek, 

Ont.: 655; withdrawn, 834. 
Dispute (Local 419, Teamsters): employees at 

Ottawa and Toronto terminals: CO. appointed, 

1392. 

Holidays See Vacations 

Homes for the Aged See Social Assistance 

Hospitals 

CNTU, views, 37. 

Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bar- 
tenders' International Union 

Agreement, Queen Elizabeth Hotel, Montreal, 
and Local 382, 241. 

Dispute (Local 28) (Canadian Pacific Air Lines 
Limited): CO. appointed, 1034. 

Hours of Work See also Textile Industry 
Alta. Federation of Labour, recommendations, 

415; views, 1358. 
AFL-CIO seeks 35-hour week with same pay, 
1011. 



INDEX 



xvir 



B.C. Hours of Work Act: exemption order, 81; 
new order, 545. 

CLC, recommendation, 404. 

Goldenberg Report — recommendations, Ontario 
Royal Commission on Labour-Management 
Relations in the Construction Industry, 781. 

ILO recommendation concerning reduction of 
hours of work, text, 939. 

Progress toward shorter work week, 289 — Brit- 
ain, 290; Canadian developments, 290; Steel- 
workers demands, 290; United States, 291. 

Que. Superior Court upholds constitutionality of 
the 1960 amendments to Collective Agreement 
Act re hours of labour, 1188. 

Shorter work week a "must" AFL-CIO President 
tells Building and Construction Trades Depart- 
ment, 397. 

Statistics: "C-Employment, Hours and Earn- 
ings" (monthly feature). 

Wage Rates, Salaries and Hours of Labour, Re- 
ports No. 43 and No. 44, federal Department 
of Labour, 2, 1107. 

Weekly hours reduced in 1961. BRITAIN: 282. 

Housing 

CLC, views, 617. 

National Housing Act: regulation re limited- 
dividend housing. QUEBEC: 790. 
Statistics. CANADA: 978. 

Hull City Transport Limited 

Certification application (Division 591, Street 
Railway Employees) : unit of bus operators 
and garage employees: 52; granted, 155. 

Hull Metropolitan Transport Limited 

Certification application (Division 591, Street 
Railway Employees) : unit of bus operators 
and garage employees: 52; granted, 155. 

Human Rights 

Ont. Human Rights Code: regulations, 1056, 

1264. 
Que. Federation of Labour, views, 138. 

Hutchinson, A.A., Chairman, National Legislative 
Committee, International Railway Brother- 
hoods 

Labour Day message, 914. 

New Year message, 1338. 



I 



Immigration-Emigration 
CLC, views, 404, 617. 
Immigration to Canada: 

during first nine months of 1962, 1297. 

in 1961, 418. 
Migration of professional workers into and out 

of Canada (1946-1960), 7. 
Railway Brotherhoods, views, 411. 

Income 

Farm cash income (1961). CANADA: 245. 
Income Tax See Taxation 

Industrial Accident Prevention Associations 
Conference, 1042. 

Work injuries reported (1961). ONTARIO, 498. 
68021-5—44 



Industrial Committees 

ILO Chemical Industries Committee, 6th session, 
651. 

ILO Metal Trades Committee, 7th Session, 1279. 
Industrial Development 

Industrial growth, Citizens' Forum television 
programs. CANADA: 2. 

National Industrial Expansion Conference, De- 
partment of Trade and Commerce. CANADA: 
1103. 

N.S. Federation of Labour, recommendations, 
415. 
Industrial Disputes See Jurisdictional Disputes; 

Labour Disputes 
Industrial Expansion See Trade and Commerce, 

Department of 
Industrial Fatalities See Accidents, Industrial 
Industrial Health See Health, Industrial 
Industrial Relations See also Labour Laws and 
Regulations; Legal Decisions; Laval Univer- 
sity; McGill University 

Alta. Labour Act: new orders, 1396. 

B.C. Court of Appeal quashes Labour Relations 
Board's substitution of bargaining agent by 
varying certification order, 859. 

B.C. Hydro and Power Authority Act: regula- 
tions, 1260. 

B.C. Supreme Court declines jurisdiction over 
federal Labour Relations Board sitting outside 
the province, 862. 

CCA, National Labour Relations Conference, 
1333. 

CM A Industrial Relations Conference, 811. 

CNTU, views, 1377. 

CNTU, views, brief to Quebec government, 281. 

Duquette, Joseph A.R. (Remi), senior concilia- 
tion officer, federal Department of Labour, 
death of, 596. 

Goldenberg Report — Ontario Royal Commission 
on Labour-Management Relations in the 
Construction Industry, 775. 

Industrial Relations and Conciliation (monthly 
feature). 

Labour peace in Sweden, 1262. 

Labour-Management Committee Conferences 
sponsored by federal Department of Labour: 
first, 304; second, 396; third, 595. 

Man. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1250. 

McKinnon Report on Labour Legislation. 
NOVA SCOTIA: 507. 

Montague, Dr. J. T., federal Department of 
Labour, appointed Director of Institute of 
Industrial Relations and Associate Professor 
of Economics, University of British Columbia, 
596. 

N.B. Labour Relations Act: amendment, 82. 

Nfid. Federation of Labour, views, 910. 

Ont. Federation of Labour, views, 1356. 

Ont. High Court rules dismissal of employees on 
legal strike is unlawful under Ontario Labour 
Relations Act, 347. 

Ont. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 224, 
1192, 1252. 

OECD seminar, "Attitudes and Methods of 
Communication and Consultation between 
Employers and Workers at Individual Firm 
Level", Canada represented, 774. 



XVIII 



INDEX 



P.E.I. Industrial Relations Act: regulations, 

1256. 
Que. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1256. 
Que. Labour Relations Board — Marius Bergeron, 

Research Director, CNTU, appointed to 

Board, 1102. 
Queen's University, eight articles on industrial 

relations, 121. 
Religion-Labour Council of Canada, convention, 

132. 
Sask. Court of Appeal holds that Labour Rela- 
tions Board's right to determine who are 

employees is not open to review, 1395. 
Sask. Court of Appeal quashes Labour Relations 

Board's order that found company engaging 

in unfair labour practices, 1393. 
Sask. Court of Appeal upholds Labour Relations 

Board's findings of unfair labour practice on 

part of an employer, 1394. 
Supreme Court of Canada restores B.C. Labour 

Relations Board's decision refusing to certify 

craft units in lumber industry, 344. 
Supreme Court of Canada upholds conviction 

of company for discharging employees on 

strike called in compliance with Ontario 

Labour Relations Act, 1043. 

Industrial Relations and Disputes Investiga- 
tion Act 
CLC, recommendation, 404. 
Industrial Research See Research 
Industrial Safety See Safety, Industrial 
Industrial Standards 
Goldenberg Report — Ontario Royal Commission 
on Labour-Management Relations in the Con- 
struction Industry, recommendations, 781. 
Ont. Industrial Standards Act: regulations, 352. 

Industrialization 
Human consequences of the changing of in- 
dustrial environment — 2nd conference opened 
by Duke of Edinburgh, 915. 

Injunctions 

B.C. Supreme Court holds Labour Relations 
Boards may make order in nature of an in- 
junction but can not award damages, 73. 

N.B. Supreme Court (Appeal Division) upholds 
injunction restraining picketing and granting 
of damages caused by illegal strike, 540. 

Insurance See Automation, Wage Insurance 
Insurance, Health 

Nfld. Federation of Labour, views, 910. 
Inter-City Truck Lines Limited 
Dispute (Local 938, Teamsters) : CO. appointed, 
951; C.B. appointed, 1149; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 1149. 

International Affairs 
CLC, views, 405, 611, 619. 

International Association of Personnel in 
Employment Security 
Convention, 49th, 1130. 

International Confederation of Free Trade 
Unions 
Seventh World Congress, 973. 



International Conference of Labour Statis- 
ticians 
Meeting, 10th, 1280. 

International Federation of Christian Trade 
Unions 
CNTU convention, remarks of Maurice Boula- 
doux, President, 1376. 

International Institute for Labour Studies 
Director, Rt. Hon. Hilary A. Marquand, D.Sc, 

47. 
First course, syllabus, 423. 
First study course at ILO's institute, 1143. 
TUC scholarship, 153. 

International Labour Organization 

Canadian legislation on women's work com- 
pared with ILO standards, 526. 

Conventions, ratifications total 2,535, 527. 

Director-General, David A. Morse, withdraws 
resignation, 153; report to 46th session of 
General Conference, 832; report on Older 
People — Work and Retirement, 636. 

Employment conditions of African women, ILO 
African Advisory Committee, 1384. 

General Conference — Session, 46th: 830, 930; 
agenda and delegation, 650. 

Governing Body — Session, 150th, 48; Session, 
151st, 424. 

Industrial Committees — Chemical Industries 
Committee, sixth Session, 651; Metal Trades 
Committee, seventh Session, 1279. 

International activities in rehabilitation, 827. 

International Conference of Labour Statisticians, 
tenth, 1280. 

International Institute for Labour Studies, 423, 
1143. 

Marquand, Rt. Hon. Hilary A., D.Sc, Director 
of International Institute for Labour Studies, 
47. 

Rwanda, 103rd ILO member country, 1145. 

Tanganyika, 102nd member, 424. 

Trade Union Situation in Burma — report, ILO 
mission, 1281. 

Trade Union Situation in the Federation of 
Malaya — report, ILO mission, 1144. 

International Union, United Automobile, 
Aerospace and Agricultural Implement 
Workers of America See Auto Workers 

Isbell Construction Company of Canada 
Limited 
Certification application (Local 1031, Mine, Mill 
and Smelter Workers) : unit of open pit 
mine employees: 1147; granted, 1147. 



Job Discrimination See Discrimination 
Job Security See Layoffs 

Jodoin, Claude, President, Canadian Labour Con- 
gress 

CLC brief, answer to Government's reply, 407. 

CLC convention, opening speech, 610. 

CNTU, message, 1376. 

Labour Day message, 913. 

National Productivity Council, resignation, 1113. 



INDEX 



XIX 



New Year message, 1337. 

Nfld. Federation of Labour, 910. 

Ont. Federation of Labour, address, 1357. 

Jurisdictional Disputes See also Raiding 

AFL-CIO, views, 38. 

AFL-CIO Internal Disputes Plan, activities, 1334. 

CLC convention, resolution, 605. 

Ont. High Court quashes decision of Jurisdic- 
tional Disputes Commission as it had no 
power to hear complaint, 77. 

Ont. Labour Relations Act: amendment, 1254. 



K 



Kent Line Limited (Irving Oil Company) 
Certification application (Seafarers): unit of 

marine engineers: 1387. 
Certification application (Seafarers) : unit of 

unlicensed employees, 1387. 

Kingcome Navigation Company 

Dispute (Seafarers): C.B. appointed, 656; C.B. 

fully constituted, 836; C.B. report, 1150; 
settlement, 1284. 

Kitchener-Waterloo Broadcasting Company 
Limited 
Dispute (Broadcast Employees): CO. appointed, 
158; settlement, 333. 

KLM Royal Dutch Airlines 

Application for revocation of certification (Air 
Line Dispatchers); unit of flight dispatchers 
at Montreal airport: granted, 1032; 1033. 

Certification application (Auto Workers): re- 
jected, 156. 

Dispute (Air Line Dispatchers) : CO. appointed, 
333; settlement, 533. 

Kohler Company 

UAW strike against Kohler Company of She- 
boygan, Wis., ended after 8i years, 1366. 



Labour Code See Labour Laws and Regulations 
Labour Conditions See also Fair Wages 
Employment in Canada, 1961, wages and work- 
ing conditions, 5, 6. 
Employment conditions, African women, ILO 

African Advisory Committee study, 1384. 
"Labour Conditions in Federal Government 

Contracts" (monthly feature) 
Working Conditions in Manufacturing in 1961, 
286 — plant workers, 287; office employees, 
288. 

Labour Day 
Labour Day message, Hon. Michael Starr, Min- 
ister of Labour, 912. 
Labour Day message, labour leaders, 913. 

Labour, Department of 

"Department of Labour Today" (monthly 

feature) 
"50 Years Ago This Month: from the Labour 
Gazette, 19 " (monthly feature). 



Hales, Alfred D., Parliamentary Secretary to 
Minister of Labour, Hon. Michael Starr, 
appointment, 1010. 

Labour Disputes See also Jurisdictional 
Disputes 

CLC special committee investigates Carpenters- 
IWA dispute (Newfoundland loggers), 122; 
proposed settlement, 396; convention report, 
608. 

Canadian railways and 17 unions of non-operat- 
ing employees accept Conciliation Board's 
recommendations, 1008. 

Munroe, Hon. Justice F. Craig, chairman of 
Conciliation Board re dispute between Cana- 
dian railways and 17 unions, appointed by 
Minister of Labour, 595. 

Termination, Auto Workers strike, Kohler Com- 
pany of Sheboygan, Wis., after 8i years, 1366. 

Labour Force 
Statistics: "A-Labour Force" (monthly feature). 
Women in the labour force — DBS survey, 1135. 

Labour Gazette 
"50 Years Ago This Month: from the Labour 
Gazette, 19 " (monthly feature). 

Labour Income 
Statistics: "B-Labour Income" (monthly fea- 
ture). 

Labour Laws and Regulations See also Indus- 
trial Standards 

Alta. Federation of Labour, recommendations, 
415. 

Alta. Labour Act: new orders, 544. 

B.C. Federation of Labour, Legislative Com- 
mittee report to convention, 1361. 

Canadian Association of Labour Legislation, 
21st conference, 1064. 

Canadian legislation on women's work compared 
with ILO standards, 526. 

Corporations and Labour Unions Returns Act — 
CLC, recommendations, 404. 
CNTU, views, 409. 

General assistance legislation, November 1960 — 
December 1961 — changes: Alberta, Manitoba, 
Newfoundland, Ontario, Quebec, Saskatche- 
wan, 783. 

Labour legislation, CLC, views, 404. 

Labour standards, 1962. CANADA: 1015. 

Man. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1250. 

McKinnon Report on Labour Legislation. 
NOVA SCOTIA: 507. 

Ont. Department of Labour Act — 

Labour Safety Council of Ontario established, 

1349. 
regulation, 352. 

Ont. Hydro-Employees' Union Dispute Act 
(1961-62), 1255. 

Ont. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1252. 

Que. Federation of Labour, recommendations, 
414. 

Recent Regulations under Provincial Legislation 
(monthly feature). 

Labour Legislation See Labour Laws and 
Regulations 

Labour-Management Co-Operation 

British High Commissioner, Rt. Hon. the Vis- 



XX 



INDEX 



count Amory, addresses Ontario Chapter, 
Council of Profit Sharing Industries, 1238. 

Canada attends OECD seminar on "Attitudes 
and Methods of Communication and Con- 
sultation between Employers and Workers 
at Individual Firm Level", 774. 

Labour-Management Committee Conference 
sponsored by federal Department of Labour: 
first, Winnipeg, 304; second, Cornwall, 396, 
595. 

National Productivity Council — 
First annual report, 1263. 
Labour-management seminar: first, Kingston, 

396, 1263; second, Halifax, N.S., 1263. 
Meeting, tenth, 1332. 

Sponsors first tripartite mission to Europe, 
909, 1011. 

President Kennedy's Advisory Committee on 
Labor-Management Policy — 
Reaches conclusion on automation, 324. 
Urges corporate tax cut, 1333. 

"Teamwork in Industry" (monthly feature). 

White House Conference on National Economic 
Issues, 305. 

Labour-Management Relations 

Goldenberg Report — recommendations of Ontario 
Royal Commission on Labour-Management 
Relations in the Construction Industry, 775. 

Labour Movement See International Labour 
Organization; Labour Unions 

Labour Organizations See Labour Unions 

Labour Relations See Industrial Relations; 
Legal Decisions 

Labour Representation 
Railway Brotherhoods, views, 413. 

Labour Standards 

Canadian legislation on women's work compared 
with ILO standards, 526. 

Interprovincial standards examinations for 
certain trades approved, National Apprentice- 
ship Training Advisory Committee, 1341. 

Legislation enacted in 1962. CANADA: 1015. 

Man. Employment Standards Act: amendments, 
1017, 1018, 1019; provisions, 1352. 

Shops Regulation Act. CANADA: repeal of 
Part 11, 1352. 

U.S. Fair Labor Standards Act: Hazardous Oc- 
cupations Order No. 16, 456. 

Labour Statisticians See International Con- 
ference of Labour Statisticians 

Labour Statistics 
"Latest Labour Statistics" (monthly feature). 

Labour Studies See International Institute 
for Labour Studies 

Labour Supply See Employment 

Labour Unions See also International Labour 

Organization; Legal Decision; Union Shop 

Affiliation of organizations outside the Congress, 

CLC views, 608. 
Alta. Federation of Labour — 
Brief to provincial Cabinet, 415. 
Convention, 1358. 



Brandon Hall group. CANADA: 

exploitation in construction industry, 776. 

five construction unions reduced to three, 
1236. 
B.C. Federation of Labour, convention, 1361. 
CLC, brief to federal Cabinet, 402. 
CLC, convention, 499, 605. 
Canadian Maritime Union affiliates with CLC, 

131. 
Canadian Workers' College, established, 320. 
Civil servants' right of association, CNTU, 

views, 1377. 
Conciliation board's recommendations accepted 

by Canadian railways and 17 unions, non- 
operating employees, 1008. 
CNTU, brief to federal Cabinet, 407. 
CNTU, convention, 1372. 
CNTU, membership, 1375. 
Corporations and Labour Unions Returns Act — 

CLC, recommendations, 404. 

CNTU, views, 409. 

Provisions, 1346. 
Industrial and geographic distribution of union 

membership, 1961. CANADA: 292. 
Labour Organizations in Canada, 51st edition, 

federal Department of Labour, 1101. 
Man. Federation of Labour, convention, 1363. 
McKinnon Report on Labour Legislation. NOVA 

SCOTIA: 507. 
Membership. BRITAIN: 1268. 
Membership, 1961. CANADA: 292. 
Membership, 1962. CANADA: 1237. 
Membership, biennial survey 1959-1960. 

UNITED STATES: 476. 
N.B. Federation of Labour, convention, 1359. 
N.S. Federation of Labour, brief to provincial 

Cabinet, 415. 
Ont. Federation of Labour, convention, 1355. 
"Open-door" policy reaffirmed, CLC, 606. 
Pledge to eliminate discrimination, 120 AFL- 

CIO unions, 1335. 
Que. Federation of Labour — 

Brief to provincial Cabinet, 414. 

Convention, 135. 
Railway Brotherhoods, brief to federal Cabinet, 

411. 
Re-admission of expelled unions, AFL-CIO 

views, 39. 
Russell, R. B. "Bob", Executive Secretary, Win- 
nipeg and District Labour Council (CLC), 

retirement, 1334. 
Sask. Federation of Labour, convention, 1364. 
Steelworkers, policy conference. CANADA: 621. 
TUC. BRITAIN: meeting, 1268. 
Unions negotiate agreements providing reduced 

working hours. CANADA, UNITED STATES: 

289. 
White-collar workers, CLC committee to 

organize, 396. 
Women in trade unions, DENMARK: 152. 

Labour Unity 

Que. Federation of Labour, views, 138. 

Labourers Protective Union 
Dispute (Buntain Bell and Company Limited): 

settlement, 973. 
Dispute (J. A. Gormley, Stevedoring Service): 

settlement, 973. 



INDEX 



XXI 



Dispute (Horace B. Willis Limited) : settlement, 
973. 

Lake Carriers, Association of 
Dispute (Seafarers): CO. appointed, 333; C.B. 
appointed, 444; C.B. fully constituted, 444; 
C.B. report, 534. 

Laval University 

Industrial relations conference, 632. 

Law Quarries Transportation Limited 
Certification application (Merchant Service): 
unit of deck officers: 1387. 

Layoffs See also Termination of Employment 
Arbitration board sustains management's right 
on layoff in dispute between Railroad Tele- 
graphers and Chicago and North Western 
Railway. UNITED STATES: 1239. 
NLRB orders parent company to pay laid-off 
employees of subsidiary. UNITED STATES: 
1405. 

Leamington Transport (Western) Limited 
Dispute (Local 979, Teamsters) : CO. appointed, 
655; settlement, 1034. 

Legal Decisions 

B.C. County Court finds a company not guilty 

when it refused to discharge employee who 

had resigned from union, 1187. 
B.C. Court of Appeal — 

Holds that Trade-unions Act does not prohibit 
information picketing, upholds limitations 
in Act, 69. 

Quashes Labour Relations Board's substitution 
of bargaining agent by varying certification 
order, 859. 

Rules that writ of certiorari not applicable 
to arbitrators set up by collective agree- 
ment, 72. 

Upholds constitutional validity of legislation 
banning use of union dues for political 
purposes, 1184. 

Upholds judgment quashing certification order 
because employer kept from making repre- 
sentation, 857. 

Upholds order that set aside award of arbitra- 
tion board under a collective agreement, 
856. 
B.C. Supreme Court — 

Declines jurisdiction over federal Labour Rela- 
tions Board sitting outside the province, 862. 

Finds union member wrongfully expelled from 
the union, sets aside expulsion, awards, 
damages, 863. 

Holds Labour Relations Boards may make 
order in nature of an injunction but cannot 
award damages, 73. 

Quashes an arbitration award because of an 
error of law on face of award, Re Columbia 
Packing Co. Ltd. and Amalgamated Meat 
Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North 
America, 541. 

Refuses to quash certification order when com- 
plaint based mainly on procedural grounds, 
76. 

Rules arbitration award on a specific ques- 
tion of law can't be set aside, no matter how 
erroneous, 1050. 



Rules employer need not prove employee's 
guilt beyond reasonable doubt before dis- 
charging him, 221. 

Rules that union not prevented from picketing 
other places of business of the same em- 
ployer, 74. 

Upholds constitutional validity of legislation 
banning use of union dues for political pur- 
poses, 219. 

Upholds union's right to picket all operations 
of a company provided that strike is a legal 
one, 349. 
Legal Decisions Affecting Labour (monthly 

feature). 
Man. Court of Appeal refuses to stay taking of 

representation vote while appeal from Labour 

Board's order pending, 1287. 
Man. Court of Queen's Bench rules that a trade 

union in Manitoba has no legal status to 

obtain mandamus order from court, 955. 
N.B. Supreme Court (Appeal Division) upholds 

injunction restraining picketing and granting 

of damages caused by illegal strike, 540. 
N.S. Supreme Court — 

Enjoins picketing, awards damages to com- 
pany because voting on strike did not com- 
ply with Act, 446. 

Quashes certification order for province-wide 
bargaining unit; application covered smaller 
unit, 448. 
Ont. High Court- 
Dismisses application to quash ruling of an 
arbitration board under collective agree- 
ment, Re Canadian Westinghouse Co. Ltd. 
and United Electrical, Radio & Machine 
Workers of America, Local 504, 452. 

Quashes arbitration decision on ground that 
board declined to exercise its jurisdiction, 
959. 

Quashes decision of Jurisdictional Disputes 
Commission as it had no power to hear 
complaint, 77. 

Rules dismissal of employees on legal strikes 
is unlawful under Ontario Labour Relations 
Act, 347. 

Rules the dismissal of several officers of a 
local union by the national president is 
invalid, 222. 

Upholds validity of union dues agreement that 
was collateral to collective agreement in 
force, 450. 
Que. Court of Queen's Bench — 

Rules arbitration board cannot amend its 
award once made, can only correct simple 
clerical error, 1047. 

Upholds validity of union dues agreement 
between employer and certified bargaining 
agents, 956. 
Que. Superior Court upholds constitutionality 

of the 1960 amendments to Collective Agree- 
ment Act re hours of labour, 1188. 
Sask. Court of Appeal — 

Finds company not guilty of unfair practices 
when it refused to deduct union dues from 
wages, 1288. 

Holds that Labour Relations Board's right to 
determine who are employees is not open 
to review, 1395. 



XXII 



INDEX 



Quashes Labour Relations Board's order that 
found company engaging in unfair labour 
practices, 1393. 

Upholds Labour Relations Board's findings of 
unfair labour practice on part of an em- 
ployer, 1394. 

Upholds Labour Relation's Board's ruling that 
employer was guilty of unfair labour prac- 
tices, 1289. 
Sask. Court of Queen's Bench rules employees 

can exercise right to make an application for 

decertification at any time, 345. 
Supreme Court of Canada — 

Restores B.C. Labour Relations Board's deci- 
sion refusing to certify craft units in lumber 
industry, 344. 

Upholds conviction of company for discharg- 
ing employees on strike called in compliance 
with Act, 1043. 

Upholds finality of Workmen's Compensation 
Board decision refusing compensation to 
widow, 539. 

Upholds power of arbitration board to award 
damages for a breach of a collective agree- 
ment, 1184. 

Upholds ruling that certiorari not applicable 
to arbitration board under collective agree- 
ment, 952. 

Legislation See Labour Laws and Regulations; 
Social Legislation 

Leitch Transport Limited 
Dispute (Seafarers): CO. appointed, 333; C.B. 
appointed, 444; C.B. fully constituted, 444; 
C.B. report, 534. 

Level Crossings 

Railway Brotherhoods, views, 412. 
Libraries 

Careers in Library Service, No. 47, federal De- 
partment of Labour, 774. 
Publications Recently Received in Department 
of Labour Library. CANADA: (monthly 
feature). 

Licensing of Workmen 

B.C. Gas Act: regulations, 80. 

Man. Electricians' Licence Act: amendments, 

1352. 
Sask. Gas Inspection and Licensing Act: new 

order, 1057. 

Lifting Devices See Elevators 

Little, Walter, Limited 

Dispute (Local 938, Teamsters) : CO. appointed, 
951; C.B. appointed, 1149; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 1149. 

Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of 

Campbell, H. E., Assistant Grand Chief Engi- 
neer and National Legislative Representative, 
retirement, 1238. 

Certification application (Michigan Central Rail- 
road Company) : unit of locomotive engi- 
neers: 1386. 

Dispute (Canadian National Railways: Atlantic, 
Central and Western Regions) : C.B. report, 
159; settlement, 534. 

Dispute (Canadian Pacific Railway Company: 
Atlantic, Eastern, Prairie and Pacific Regions 



and Quebec Central Railway Company) : C.B. 
report, 180; settlement, 534. 

Legal decision, 956. 

Walter, John F., Assistant Grand Chief Engineer 
and National Legislative Representative, ap- 
pointment, 1238. 

Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brother- 
hood of 

Dispute (Canadian National Railways: Atlantic, 
St. Lawrence, Great Lakes, Mountain and 
Prairie Regions, and including Newfoundland 
District) : C.B. report, 538; settlement, 534. 

Dispute (Canadian Pacific Railway Company: 
Atlantic, Eastern, Prairie and Pacific Regions, 
including Quebec Central Railway Company 
and Dominion Atlantic Railway Company): 
C.B. report of settlement, 836, 850. 

Dispute (Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Rail- 
way Company): CO. appointed, 1034; settle- 
ment, 1392. 

Legal decision, 956. 

Logging See Lumber and Wood Products 
Industry 

Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, 
International 

Certification application (Local 501) (Canadian 
Stevedoring Company Limited): unit of 
Waterboys (Ports of Vancouver and New 
Westminster): 949; granted, 949. 

Certification application (Local 501) (Coast- 
wise Pier Limited): unit of dock and shed 
employees and equipment operators: 530; 
withdrawn, 655. 

Certification application (new) (Local 501) 
Coastwise Pier Limited) : unit of dock and 
shed employees: 655; representation vote, 
949; granted, 1031. 

Certification application (Local 509) (North- 
land Terminals Company Limited) (Canadian 
Area): unit of checkers: 1387. 

Certification application (Local 502) (Overseas 
Transport Company Limited): unit of long- 
shoremen: 442; granted, 653. 

Certification application (Local 501) (Packers 
Steamship Company Limited) : unit of dock 
and warehousemen: 1033; granted, 1147. 

Dispute (Canadian Coast Negotiating Com- 
mittee) (Shipping Federation of British 
Columbia): CO. appointed, 1034; C.B. ap- 
pointed, 1149. 

Longshoremen's Association, International 

Certification applications (Local 375) — 

Atlantic and Gulf Stevedores Limited, rejected, 
331. 

Brown and Ryan Limited, rejected, 331. 

Canadian Pacific Steamships, Limited, re- 
jected, 331. 

Cullen Stevedoring Company, rejected, 331. 

Cunard Steamships Company, rejected, 331. 

Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company Limited, 
rejected, 331. 

Empire Stevedoring Company Limited, re- 
jected, 331. 

Furness Withy and Company Limited, re- 
jected, 331. 

McLean Kennedy, Limited, rejected, 331. 



INDEX 



XXIII 



Montreal and Saint John Stevedoring Com- 
pany Limited, rejected, 331. 

Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc., rejected, 
331. 

Wolfe Stevedores Limited, rejected, 331. 
Dispute (Local 1657) (Shipping Federation of 

Canada, Inc): checkers and cargo repairmen: 

C.B. report, 334, 341; settlement, 534. 
Interveners, certification application (Henry A. 

Rodgers): withdrawn, 1148. 

Longul, Wally (et al) 
Application for revocation of certification 
(Broadcast Employees): granted, 949; 951. 

Lumber and Wood Products Industry 

B.C. Workmen's Compensation Act: regulations, 
81. 

CLC special committee to investigate dispute 
between Woodworkers and Carpenters re 
Newfoundland loggers, 122; proposed settle- 
ment, 396; report, 608. 

N.B. Logging Camps Act: provisions, 1353; 
regulations, 963. 

Supreme Court of Canada restores B.C. Labour 
Relations Board's decision refusing to certify 
craft units in lumber industry, 344. 



M 



Macdonald, Donald, Secretary-Treasurer, Cana- 
dian Labour Congress 
CLC convention, report, 618. 
CNE Board of Directors, address, 1108. 
N.S. Federation of Labour, remarks, 1119. 

MacGregor the Mover Limited 

Certification application (Local 91, Teamsters) : 
representation vote, 155; rejected, 331. 
Machinists, International Association of 

Application for revocation (Consolidated Avia- 
tion Fueling and Services Limited): rejected, 
51. 

Application for revocation (Trans-Canada Air 
Lines): 951; rejected, 1032. 

Certification application (Allied Building Serv- 
ices Limited) : unit of building cleaners at 
Montreal International Airport: 332; granted, 
529. 

Certification application (Eastern Provincial Air- 
ways, Limited): unit of maintenance em- 
ployees: granted, 1031; 1033. 

Certification application (Quebec North Shore 
and Labrador Railway Company) : unit of 
catering department employees: granted, 155. 

Certification application (Quebec North Shore 
and Labrador Railway Company) : unit of 
unlicensed personnel on M.V. Inland: 52; 
granted, 331; SIU intervened, 331. 

Certification application (TransAir Limited) : 
request for review of earlier decision, 1387. 

Manitoba Federation of Labour 
Convention, 8th, 1363. 

Mannk Company Limited 

Certification application (Local 720, Structural 
Iron Workers): 1148; granted, 1386. 



Manpower Planning 
Simmons, George E., Co-ordinator, Emergency 
Manpower Planning, federal Department of 
Labour, appointment, 120. 

Manpower Utilization 

Advisory Committee on Professional Manpower. 
CANADA: 7th meeting, 11. 

Manpower Training Advisory Council estab- 
lished. NOVA SCOTIA: 280. 

Meeting manpower challenge of the 1960's — 
development of technical and vocational train- 
ing program. CANADA: 1330. 

Manufacturing See also Canadian 

Manufacturers' Association 
Manufacturers' profits, 1961. CANADA: 791. 
Working Conditions in Manufacturing in 1961. 

CANADA: 286— plant workers, 287; office 

employees, 288. 

Maple Leaf Milling Company Limited 

Dispute (Local 511, Packinghouse Workers): 
CO. appointed, 333; settlement, 444. 

Marchand, Jean, General President, Confedera- 
tion of National Trade Unions 

Labour Day message, 914. 

New Year message, 1338. 

Presents brief to federal Cabinet, 407; answer 
to Government's reply to brief, 410. 

Report, special convention, 32; moral report, 34. 

Report, 40th convention, 1373. 

Marconi Salaried Employees Association 
Intervener, certification application (Canadian 
Marconi Company) : unit of production em- 
ployees, CFCF-TV, Montreal: granted, 50. 

Marine Engineers' Beneficial Association of 

Canada, National 
Certification applications (marine engineers) — 

Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 
Company, rejected, 50. 

Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation, re- 
jected, 50. 

Hall Corporation of Canada, rejected, 50. 

National Sand and Material Company Limited, 
rejected, 50. 

N. M. Paterson and Sons Limited, rejected, 50. 

K. A. Powell (Canada) Limited, rejected, 51. 

Scott Misener Steamships Limited, rejected, 51. 

Marine Engineers of Canada, National 
Association of 
Intervener, certification applications (marine 
engineers) — 
Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 

Company, rejected, 50. 
Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation, 

(Dominion Shipping Division, Montreal), 

rejected, 50. 
Hall Corporation of Canada, rejected, 50. 
National Sand and Material Company Limited, 

rejected, 50. 
N. M. Paterson and Sons Limited, rejected, 50. 
K. A. Powell (Canada) Limited, rejected, 51. 
Scott Misener Steamships Limited, rejected, 51. 

Maritime Terminals Inc. 

Dispute (Railway and Steamship Clerks): CO. 
appointed, 1149; settlement, 1283. 



XXIV 



INDEX 



Master and Servant See Wage Recovery 
McCabe Grain Company Limited 

Dispute (Local 514, Teamsters): lapsed, 158. 
McGill University 

Canadian Workers' College, participation, 320. 

Industrial relations conference, 14th, 623. 

McKenzdz Barge Company 

Dispute (Seafarers): C.B. appointed, 656; C.B. 
fully constituted, 836; C.B. report, 1150; 
settlement, 1284. 

McKinlay Transport Limited 
Dispute (Local 938, Teamsters) : CO. appointed, 
951. 
McKinnon, Judge Alexander H. 
CMA Industrial Relations Conference, address, 

811. 
Report as Fact-Finding Body on Labour Legisla- 
tion. Nova Scotia: 507. 
McLean Kennedy, Limited 

Certification application (Local 375, Longshore- 
men) : rejected, 331. 
Certification application (Local 375, Railway 
and Steamship Clerks): rejected, 331. 

Means Test 

Que. Public Charities Act: amendment, 784. 

Meany, George, President, American Federation 
of Labor — Congress of Industrial Organiza- 
tions 

Building and Construction Trades Department, 
8th conference, address, 397. 

On Internal Disputes Plan, 1334. 

Re-election, 38, 40. 

Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North 
America, Amalgamated 
Legal decision, 541. 
Medical Services 
Ont. Federation of Labour, recommendations, 
1355. 

Medicine See Vocational Rehabilitation 
Merchant Marine See Shipping 
Merchant Service Guild, Inc., Canadian 

Certification application (Law Quarries Trans- 
portation Limited): unit of deck officers: 
1387. 

Certification application (Northumberland Fer- 
ries Limited) : unit of deck officers and marine 
engineers aboard S/S Charles A. Dunning and 
M/V Lord Selkirk: 1147; granted, 1147. 

Certification application (Papachristidis Com- 
pany Limited): unit of deck officers: 834; 
granted, 949. 

Dispute (British Columbia Towboat Owners 
Association) : CO. appointed, 53. 

Dispute (Vancouver Barge Transportation Lim- 
ited): CO. appointed, 836; settlement, 1034. 

Metal Trades 

ILO Metal Trades Committee, 7th session, 1279. 
Michigan Central Railroad Company 

Certification application (Locomotive Engineers) : 
unit of locomotive engineers: 1386. 



Midland Railway of Manitoba 

Dispute (Associated Non-operating Unions) : 
C.B. appointed, 533; CB. fully constituted, 
656; CB. report, 1181; settlement after CB. 
procedure, 1150. 

Migrant Workers 

ILO convention text concerning basic aims and 
standards of social policy — provisions re mi- 
grant workers, 934. 

Millar and Brown Limited 

Certification application (Local 605, Teamsters) : 

157; withdrawn, 333. 
Certification application (Locals 987, 181 and 

605, Teamsters): 442; granted, 653. 
Dispute (Locals 987, 181 and 605, Teamsters): 

CO. appointed, 951; settlement, 1034. 

Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers (Canada), 

International Union of 
Certification application (Local 1031) (Isbell 

Construction Company of Canada Limited): 

unit of open pit mine employees: 1147; 

granted, 1147. 
Dispute (Local 802) (Giant Yellowknife Mines 

Limited) : CO. appointed, 533; settlement, 

655. 
Dispute (Local 1006) (Faraday Uranium Mines 

Limited): CO. appointed, 1392. 
Dispute (Local 1015) (National Harbours 

Board — Port Colborne Grain Elevator) : CO. 

appointed, 1149. 
Legal decisions, 72, 952, 959. 
Ont. High Court rules the dismissal of several 

officers of a local union by the national 

president is invalid, 222. 

Mine Workers of America, United 

Certification application (Local 13946) (Central 
Mortgage and Housing Corporation) : unit of 
janitors and maintenance men at St. Michel 
Terrace Housing Project, St. Michel, Que.: 
granted, 1031; 1033. 

Mines and Technical Surveys, Department of 
Flynn, Hon. Jacques, Minister, reply to CNTU 
brief, 410. 

Minimum Wages 
Alta. Federation of Labour, views, 1358. 
Alta. Labour Act: orders, 544. 
B.C. Female Minimum Wage Act: order, 351. 
B.C. Male Minimum Wage Act: order, 351. 
CLC, recommendation, 404. 
Goldenberg Report — recommendations, Ontario 

Royal Commission on Labour-Management 

Relations in the Construction Industry, 781. 
N.B. Minimum Wage Act: regulation, 224. 
P.E.I. Minimum Wage Act: order, 1192. 
P.E.I. Women's Minimum Wage Act: order, 352. 
Que. Minimum Wage Act: amendments, 1399; 

orders, 1056, 1291; regulations, 734. 
Sask. Minimum Wage Act: amendments, 1057; 

correction, 1199; revised orders, 964. 

Mining 

N.B. Mining Act: regulations, 1353. 
N.S. Coal Mines Regulation Act: amendments, 
1354. 



INDEX 



XXV 



N.S. Metalliferous Mines and Quarries Act: 

amendment, 1354. 
Ont. Mining Act: provisions, 1350. 

Montague, Dr. J. T., Federal Department of 
Labour 
Director of the Institute of Industrial Relations 
and Associate Professor of Economics al 
University of British Columbia, appointment, 
596. 

Montreal and Saint John Stevedore Company 
Limited 

Certification application (Local 375, Longshore- 
men): rejected, 331. 

Certification application (Local 375, Railway 
and Steamship Clerks): rejected, 331. 

Montreal Ottawa Express Limited 
Certification application (Local 106, Teamsters, 

intervener): rejected, 1031. 
Certification application (Syndicat National des 

Chauffeurs de Camion du Quebec): unit of 

drivers, dockmen, warehousemen and helpers: 

950; rejected, 1031. 

Morris, Joe, Executive Vice-President, Canadian 

Labour Congress 
N.B. Federation of Labour convention, remarks, 

1360. 
Sask. Federation of Labour convention, remarks, 

1365. 

Morse, David A., Director-General, International 
Labour Office 

Report on "Older People — Work and Retire- 
ment," 636. 

Report to 46th session of General Conference, 
832. 

Withdraws resignation, 153. 

Mothers' Allowances 

N.B. Social Assistance Act: amendment, 788. 

Nfld. Mothers' Allowances (Repeal) Act (1961): 
783. 

N.S. Social Assistance Act: amendment, 788. 

Ont. Mothers' and Dependent Children's Allow- 
ances Act: regulations, 788. 

P.E.I. Mothers' Allowances Act: amendment, 
788. 

Que. Needy Mothers' Assistance Act: amend- 
ment, 788. 

Sask. Social Aid Act: amended Regulations for 
Aid to Dependent Families, 788. 

Motor Transport Industrial Relations Bureau 

Dispute (Local 106, Teamsters) : C.B. appointed, 
158; C.B. report, 724. 

Dispute (Locals 879, 880 and 938, Teamsters): 
CO. appointed, 53; C.B. appointed, 444; C.B. 
fully constituted, 534; C.B. report, 837; strike 
action following C.B. procedure, 836; settle- 
ment after strike after C.B. procedure, 1034. 

Dispute (Local 880, Teamsters) : C.B. report, 68; 
strike after C.B. procedure, 158; settlement 
after strike after C.B. procedure, 334. 

Dispute (Local 938, Teamsters) : CO. appointed, 
951; C.B. appointed, 1149; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 1149. 



Motorways Limited 
Dispute (Local 938, Teamsters) : C.B. appointed, 
1149; C.B. fully constituted, 1149. 

Municipal Winter Works Incentive Program 
Activities (1960-61, 1961-62), 283. 
Measures proposed in Throne Speech, 120. 
Review of 1961-62 Program, 772. 
Summary of Program, 1098. 
To operate in 1962-63, 909. 



N 



National Advisory Council on the 
Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons 
Meeting, 1st, 602. 

National Apprenticeship Training Advisory 
Committee 
Meetings, 13th, 299; 14th, 1339. 
National Conference on Agricultural Training 

Meeting, 1st, 1241. 
National Employment Committee 

Meeting, 81st, 1195 
National Employment Service 
Monthly report on operations. 
Statistics: "D-National Employment Service 

Statistics" (monthly feature). 
Training unemployed workers, federal-provincial 

program, 278, 298. 
University graduates, survey of supply and 
demand (1962), 280. 

National Harbours Board 

Certification application (CSAC) (Quebec 

Harbour Police): granted 50. 
Certification application (Police Association) 

(Saint John): unit of harbour policemen: 

1033; rejected, 1147. 
Certification application (Police Association) 

(Saint John) : unit of patrolmen: 1387. 
Dispute (CSAC) (Prescott): CO. appointed, 

835; settlement, 951. 
Dispute (CSAC) (Quebec Harbour Police): 

CO. appointed, 655; settlement, 1034. 
Dispute (Local 1015, Mine Mill and Smelter 

Workers) (Port Colborne Grain Elevator): 

CO. appointed, 1149. 
Dispute (Railway and Steamship Clerks) (Mont- 
real): CO. appointed, 1283; settlement, 1392. 

National Harbours Board Police Association 
Certification application (National Harbours 
Board, Saint John): unit of harbour police- 
men: 1033; rejected, 1147. 
Certification application (National Harbours 
Board, Saint John): unit of patrolmen: 1387. 

National Housing Act 

Limited-dividend housing, regulation. QUEBEC: 
790. 

National Labor Relations Board (U.S.A.) 
Orders parent company to pay laid-off em- 
ployees of subsidiary, 1405. 
SIU charge against Canadian lake vessel, re- 
jected, 597. 



XXVI 



INDEX 



National Product 

Gross national product — 
First quarter (1962), 909; second quarter 
(1962), 1100. 

National Productivity Council 

Ability of Canada to meet competition at home 
and abroad — discussion by Donald Mac- 
Donald, Secretary-Treasurer, CLC, 1108; 
George DeYoung, Chairman, NPC, 1109; Dr. 
R. V. Yohe, President, B. F. Goodrich Canada 
Limited, 1110. 

Labour-management-government mission to Eu- 
rope, 1st, 909, 1011. 

DeYoung, George, Chairman, address, Cana- 
dian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, 
1109. 

Economic studies program approved, 1193. 

Jodoin, Claude, CLC President, resigns from 
Council, 1113. 

Meeting, 10th — proposed establishment of na- 
tional tripartite forum, 1332. 

Report, 1st annual, 1263. 

Seminars sponsored by Council at Queen's Uni- 
versity, Kingston, Ont., 396; in Kingston, 
Ont., and Halifax, N.S., 1263. 

Report, 1261. 
National Sand and Material Company Limited 

Certification application (Marine Engineers, 
intervener): unit of marine engineers: rejected, 
50. 

Certification application (Marine Engineers' 
Beneficial Association) : unit of marine engi- 
neers: rejected, 50. 

National Technical and Vocational Training 
Advisory Council 
Meeting, 3rd, 598. 

National Union of Public Service Employees 
ARTEC becomes division of NUPSE, 1333. 
Legal decision, 1395. 

Natural Resources 

Que. Federation of Labour, views, 138. 

Needy Mothers See Mothers' Allowances 

New Brunswick Federation of Labour 
Convention, 1359. 

New Year's Messages 

Hon. Michael Starr, Minister of Labour, 1336. 
Labour leaders, 1337, 1338. 

Newfoundland Federation of Labour 
Convention, 910. 

Newfoundland Loggers See Lumber and Wood 
Products Industry 

Night Work 

Canadian legislation on women's work com- 
pared with ILO standards, 526. 

Norris, Mr. Justice T. G. 

Industrial Inquiry Commission to investigate 
SIU, St. Lawrence Seaway System boycott, 
appointment, 908. 



Norris Grain Company 

Dispute (Seafarers) (Steamship Division): CO. 
appointed, 333; C.B. appointed, 444; C.B. 
fully constituted, 444; C.B. report, 534. 

North American Van Lines (Atlantic) Limited 
Certification application (Local 927, Teamsters) : 
request for review under Section 61 (2), 52; 
denied, 157. 

Northern Dock and Warehouse Company 
Limited 
Certification application (Local 5115, Steel- 
workers) : unit of warehousemen, forklift 
operators and labourers: 1148; granted, 1147. 

Northland Terminals Company Limited 

Certification application (Local 509, Longshore- 
men and Warehousemen) (Canadian area) : 
unit of checkers, 1387. 

Northumberland Ferries Limited 

Certification application (Merchant Service): 
unit of deck officers and marine engineers 
aboard S/S Charles A. Dunning and M/V 
Lord Selkirk: 1147; granted, 1147. 

Certification application (Railway, Transport 
and General Workers) : unit of deck officers 
and marine engineers aboard S/S Charles A. 
Dunning and M/V Lord Selkirk: 1147; 
granted, 1147. 

Certification application (Railway, Transport and 
General Workers): unit of mates and engi- 
neers: 1033; withdrawn, 1033. 

Northwest Airlines Inc. 

Certification application (Railway and Steam- 
ship Clerks) : unit of ticket sales agents, 
Edmonton and Winnipeg: 530; granted, 653. 

Nova Scotia Federation of Labour 
Brief, provincial Cabinet, 415. 
Convention, 1119. 

Nuclear Weapons 
CNTU, views, 37, 407. 
Que. Federation of Labour, views, 139. 



O 



Obituaries 



Cram, R. M., former Assistant Director of 
Economics and Research Branch, federal De- 
partment of Labour, 242. 

Duquette, Joseph A. R. (Remi), head of Mont- 
real office and senior conciliation officer of 
Industrial Relations Branch, federal Depart- 
ment of Labour, 596. 

Finch, Harry, ITU representative in Canada, 
1101. 

Harrison, Frederick, federal Department of 
Labour's first representative on West Coast, 
and Industrial Disputes Inquiry Commissioner, 
1102. 

MacNamara, Arthur James, C.M.G., LL.D., 
former Deputy Minister, and Director of 
National Selective Service, federal Department 
of Labour, 1236. 



INDEX 



XXVII 



Midgley, Victor Howard, B.C. labour leader, 499. 

Peebles, Dr. Allon, first Executive Director, 
UIC, 398. 

Trepanier, Francois Xavier Raoul, federal con- 
ciliator, 1101. 

Office Employees: See Manufacturing 
Office Employees' International Union 
Certification application (Local 131) (Smith 
Transport Limited): unit of office employees, 
834; withdrawn, 951. 

Ogilvie Flour Mills Company Limited 
Dispute (Local 511, Packinghouse Workers): 
CO. appointed, 333; settlement, 444. 

Oil 

Ont. Energy Act: amendments, 455, 734; regula- 
tions, 1292. 
Sask. Oil and Gas Conservation Act: regula- 
tions, 353. 

Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers' 

International Union 
Dispute (Local 16-14) (Polymer Corporation 

Limited) (Plant Unit, technicians) : C.B. 

report, 342; settlement, 334. 
Legal decisions, 219, 1184. 

Old Age Assistance 

Increase forecast, Throne Speech, 120. 
Statistics, 397, 773, 1102, 1334. 

Old Age Pensions See Pensions 
Old Age Security See Social Security 
Older Workers 
Arkansas Department of Labor, Older Worker 

Training Program, 1024. 
CCC, recommendations, 151. 
Employment and workshop for the elderly. 

BRITAIN: 1271. 
Interdepartmental Committee on Older Workers, 

federal Department of Labour, 44. 
Job Training for the Mature Woman Entering 

or Re-entering the Labour Force — federal 

Department of Labour, 749. 
Michigan, University of, Conference on Aging, 

828. 
Montreal, Conference on Aging, 1383. 
Older People — Work and Retirement — report, 

Director-General, ILO, 636. 
Older Workers' Division, Civilian Rehabilitation, 

federal Department of Labour, functions, 118. 
Older Workers: Training and Education — 

federal Department of Labour broadcast 

"Canada at Work", 1133. 
OECD Seminar on Age and Employment, 919. 
Que. Federation of Labour, views, 139. 
Retirement, a study of British attitudes, 422. 
"Social and Economic Problem of the Older 

Worker" — federal Department of Labour, 525. 
White House Conference on Aging, 328. 
Ontario Federation of Labour 

Conventions, 30, 1355. 
Ontario Hydro-Electric Power Commission 
Ontario Hydro-Employees' Union Dispute Act 

(1961-62), 1255. 
Ontario Northland Railway 

Dispute (Associated Non-operating Unions): 



C.B. appointed, 533; C.B. fully constituted, 
656; C.B. report, 1181; settlement after C.B. 
procedure, 1150. 
Operating Engineers, Canadian Union of 

Certification application (Canadian Arsenals 
Limited) : unit of stationary engineers (Small 
Arms Division) : 52; granted, 155. 

Dispute (Canadian Arsenals Limited) (Small 
Arms Division): CO. appointed, 533; settle- 
ment, 533. 
Operating Engineers, International Union of 

Certification application (Local 882) (Pacific 
Tanker Company Limited) : unit of stationary 
engineers: 157; granted, 331. 

Certification application (Local 882) (United 
Grain Growers Limited) : request for review 
under Section 61 (2) denied, 52. 

Dispute (Local 796) (Rio Algom Mines Limited, 
Nordic and Milliken Divisions) : CO. ap- 
pointed, 533; settlement, 836. 

Dispute (Local 857) (Canadian National Hotels, 
Limited — Macdonald Hotel, Edmonton) : CO. 
appointed, 1283; settlement, 1392. 
Organization for Economic Co-Operation and 
Development 

Canadian delegation, seminar on "Attitudes 
and Methods of Communication and Consul- 
tation between Employers and Workers at 
Individual Firm Level", 774. 

Seminar on Age and Employment, 919. 
Overland Express Limited 

Dispute (Local 938, Teamsters) : CO. appointed, 
951; C.B. appointed, 1149; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 1149. 
Overseas Transport Company Limited 

Certification application (Local 502, Longshore- 
men and Warehousemen) : unit of longshore- 
men: 442; granted, 653. 
Overtime 

B.C. Hours of Work Act: order, 545. 

Man. Employment Standards Act: amendments, 
1017. 
Owen Sound Transportation Company Limited 

Certification application (Canadian Maritime 
Union) : unit of unlicensed personnel on 
M.S. Normac, S.S. Norgoma and S.S. Norisle: 
52; rejected, 156. 

Certification application (Seafarers, intervener) : 
unit of unlicensed personnel: rejected, 156. 



Pacific Inland Express Limited 

Certification application (Locals 362, 979, 938 
and 31, Teamsters): representation vote, 
1386; reasons for judgment, 1388. 

Certification application (Locals 362, 979, 938 
and 605, Teamsters) : unit of employees in- 
cluding owner-drivers: 654. 

Certification application (Local 605, Teamsters) : 
157; withdrawn, 333. 
Pacific Tanker Company Limited 

Certification application (Local 882, Operating 
Engineers): unit of stationary engineers: 157; 
granted, 331. 



XXVIII 



INDEX 



Pacific Western Airlines Limited 

Dispute (Air Line Pilots) : CO. appointed, 836; 
C.B. appointed, 1149. 

Dispute (Flight Attendants) : CO. appointed, 
1149; C.B. appointed, 1392; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 1392. 

Dispute (Traffic Employees) : CO. appointed, 
1034; C.B. appointed, 1392; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 1392. 

Pacific Western Airlines Traffic Employees 
Association 
Dispute (Pacific Western Airlines Limited) : 
CO. appointed, 1034; C.B. appointed, 1392; 
C.B. fully constituted, 1392. 

Packers Steamship Company Limited 

Certification application (Local 501, Longshore- 
men and Warehousemen) : unit of dock and 
warehousemen: 1033; granted, 1147. 

Packinghouse, Food and Allied Workers, 
United 

Certification application (Robin Hood Flour 
Mills Limited): unit of technicians: granted, 
1031; 1033. 

Dispute (Local 511) (Maple Leaf Milling Com- 
pany Limited): CO. appointed, 333; settle- 
ment, 444. 

Dispute (Local 511) (Ogilvie Flour Mills Com- 
pany Limited): CO. appointed, 333; settle- 
ment, 444. 

Dispute (Local 326) (Robin Hood Flour Mills 
Limited): CO. appointed, 533; settlement, 
836. 

Dispute (Local 416) (Robin Hood Flour Mills 
Limited): C.B. appointed, 158; C.B. fully 
constituted, 334; C.B. report, 445. 

Tritschler, Mr. Justice G. E., report of inquiry 
into strike at Brandon Packers Limited, 
Brandon, Man., 4, 123. 

Papachristidis Company Limited 

Certification application (Merchant Service) : 
unit of deck officers: 834; granted, 949. 

Paterson, N. M., and Sons, Limited 

Certification application (Marine Engineers, in- 
tervener): unit of marine engineers: rejected, 
50. 

Certification application (Marine Engineers' 
Beneficial Association) : unit of marine engi- 
neers: rejected, 50. 

Patterson, Ronald (et al) 

Interveners, certification application (Local 987. 
Teamsters) (Tiger Transfer Limited): repre- 
sentation vote, 653. 

Pensions 

CLC convention, report of Social Security Com- 
mittee, 616. 

CNTU, recommendation re portable pens'jr.s, 
281; views, 1374. 

DBS pension plan survey, 1401. 

Old age pensions, increase forecast in Throne 
Speech, 120. 



Picketing 

B.C. Court of Appeal holds that Trade-unions 
Act does not prohibit information picketing, 
upholds limitations in Act, 69. 
B.C. Supreme Court — 

Rules that union not prevented from picketing 
other places of business of the same em- 
ployer, 74. 
Upholds union's right to picket all operations 
of a company provided that strike is a 
legal one, 349. 
CLC, "mischief" picketing, 404. 
N.B. Supreme Court (Appeal Division) upholds 
injunction restraining picketing and granting 
of damages caused by illegal strike, 540. 
N.S. Supreme Court enjoins picketing, awards 
damages to company because voting on strike 
did not comply with Act, 446. 

Piette Transport Inc. 

Certification application (Local 106, Teamsters) : 

unit of truck drivers and mechanics: 442; 

granted, 653. 
Dispute (Local 106, Teamsters) : CO. appointed, 

1149; settlement, 1283. 

Plant Workers See Manufacturing 
Political Action 

CNTU, views, 1372. 

Ont. Federation of Labour, views, 31. 

Que. Federation of Labour, views, 138. 

Political Education 

CLC, resolution adopted, 619. 

Pollard Bros. Limited 

Certification application (Local 880, Teamsters) : 
332; withdrawn, 443. 

Polymer Corporation Limited 

Dispute (Local 16-14, Oil, Chemical and 
Atomic Workers) (Plant Unit, technicians) : 
C.B. report, 342; settlement, 334. 

Portable Pensions See Pensions 

Porter Shipping Limited 

Certification application (Seafarers) : unit of 

marine engineers: rejected, 156. 

Certification application (Seafarers) : unit of 

unlicensed employees: rejected, 156; 1386. 

Postal Employees 

Canadian Postal Employees' Association (CLC) 
disaffiliates from Civil Service Federation of 
Canada, 1118. 
Powell, K. A. (Canada) Limited 

Certification application (Marine Engineers, in- 
tervener): unit of marine engineers: rejected, 
51. 

Certification application (Marine Engineers' 
Beneficial Association): unit of marine en- 
gineers: rejected, 51. 

Pressure Vessels See Boilers 

Prices 

"Prices and the Cost of Living". CANADA: 
(monthly feature) 

Statistics: "F-Prices" (monthly feature) 



INDEX 



XXIX 



Productivity See also British Productivity 
Council; National Productivity Council 

Farm productivity statistics discussed, Federal- 
Provincial Farm Labour Conference, 1245. 

N.S. Federation of Labour, recommendations, 
415. 

Professional Manpower See also Manpower 
Utilization 
Advisory Committee on Professional Man- 
power — 
Meeting, 11. 

report of Dr. W. R. Dymond, Assistant 
Deputy Minister of Labour, 11, 14. 
Most new doctors and masters find employment 

in Canada, 1101. 
Professional Manpower Bulletins, Department 
of Labour — 

No. 11, The Migration of Professional Work- 
ers Into and Out of Canada, 1946-1960, 7. 
No. 12, Employment and Earnings in the 
Scientific and Technical Professions, 1958- 
1961, 1308. 
Profit See Corporation Profits 



Profit Sharing 

AMC-UAW profit-sharing plan, successful first 
year, 1333. 

Amory, Rt. Hon. the Viscount, British High 
Commissioner, address to Ontario Chapter, 
Council of Profit Sharing Industries, 1238. 

Public Charities 

Que. Public Charities Act: amendments, regula- 
tions, 783. 

Public Health See Health 

Public Relations See Canadian Labour Con- 
gress; Canadian Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion 

Public Service 

CLC, resolutions on right to strike, 607. 
McKinnon report on labour legislation. NOVA 
SCOTIA: recommendation, 508. 

Public Welfare See Social Assistance 
Publications 
"Publications Recently Received in Department 

of Labour Library" (monthly feature). 

CANADA: 



PUBLICATIONS 



Departmental Publications — 



Careers in Library Service, No. 47, 11 A. 

Careers in Natural Science, No. 21, 114. 

Electrical and Electronic Occupations, 1011. 

Employment and Earnings in the Scientific and Technical Professions (1958-1961), 1308. 

Job Training for the Mature Woman Entering or Re-entering the Labour Force, 749. 

Migration of Professional Workers Into and Out of Canada (1946-1960) (No. 11), 1. 

Primary Textile Industry: Wages and Hours in 1960, 282. 

Technical and Vocational Training in Canada, 911. 

Technological Changes and Skilled Manpower: Electronic Data Processing Occupations 

in a Large Insurance Company, 15. 
Vocational and Technical Training for Girls, 96. 
Vocational Training Needs in Canadian Agriculture, No. 5D, 911. 

Wage Rates, Salaries and Hours of Labour, Report No. 43 and Report No. 44, 2, 1107. 
Workmen's Compensation in Canada (1961), 282. 



Quatsino Navigation 

Dispute (Seafarers) : C.B. appointed, 656; C.B. 
fully constituted, 836; C.B. report, 1150; 
settlement, 1284. 

Quebec Central Railway Company See also 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company 

Dispute (Locomotive Engineers) : C.B. report, 
180; settlement, 534. 

Quebec Federation of Labour 

Brief, provincial Cabinet, 414. 
Convention, 135. 

Quebec House 

Que. Federation of Labour, opposition to estab- 
lishment of so-called Quebec Houses in various 
countries, 139. 



Quebec North Shore and Labrador Railway 

Certification application (Machinists): unit of 

catering department employees: granted, 155. 
Certification application (Machinists): unit of 

unlicensed personnel on M.V. Inland: 52; 

granted, 331; SIU intervened, 331. 
Intervener, certification application (Seafarers) : 

unit of unlicensed employes on M.V. Inland: 

granted, 331. 

Quebec Paper Sales and Transportation Com- 
pany Limited 

Dispute (Seafarers) : C.B. report, 60. 

Quebec Terminals Limited 

Dispute (Railway and Steamship Clerks) : CO. 
appointed, 1149; settlement, 1283. 

Queen's University 
Eight articles on industrial relations, 121. 



XXX 



INDEX 



R 



Radiation 

N.S. Public Health Act: provisions, 1354. 

Radio and Television Employees of Canada, 
Association of 
Becomes division of Nupse, 1333. (Artec repre- 
sents certain CBC personnel). 

Radio Broadcasting See Broadcasting; Canadian 
Broadcasting Corporation 

Radio-Laurentides Inc. 
Dispute (Broadcast Employees) : CO. appointed, 
835; settlement, 951. 

Raiding 

CLC, report of special committee re carpenters 
— IWA dispute, 608. 

CNTU, proposes establishment of joint com- 
mittee on ethics to study problems of union 
jurisdiction . . . union raiding, 37. 

Railroad Telegraphers, Order of 

Arbitration board sustains management's right 
on layoff in dispute between Railroad Teleg- 
raphers and Chicago and North Western 
Railway, 1239. 

Dispute (Canadian Pacific Air Lines Limited) 
(System Division No. 7): CO. appointed, 333; 
settlement, 533. 

Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of 

Certification application (Sydney and Louisburg 
Railway Company) : unit of trainmen in yard 
and road service: granted, 155. 

Dispute (Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Rail- 
way): CO. appointed, 1149. 

Dispute (Canadian National Railways) : CB. 
report, 656; settlement, 836. 

Dispute (Canadian Pacific Railway Company — 
Atlantic, Eastern, Prairie and Pacific Regions) : 
CB. report, 1152; settlement after mediation 
after Board procedure, 1415. 

Dispute (Sydney and Louisburg Railway Com- 
pany) (Lodge No. 684): CO. appointed, 533; 
CB. appointed, 973; CB. fully constituted, 
1034; settlement after CB. procedure, 1150; 
CB. report, 1180. 

Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Han- 
dlers, Express and Station Employees, 
Brotherhood of 

Certification application (Canadian National 
Railways) : unit of highway drivers employed 
in Newfoundland: 332; granted, 529. 

Certification application (Canadian Pacific Rail- 
way Company) : unit of clerks employed in 
Regional Accounting Office, Merchandise 
Services, Winnipeg: granted, 949; 950. 

Certification application (Gaspe Shipping Regis- 
tered) : unit of longshoremen: granted, 50. 

Certification application (Northwest Airlines, 
Inc., St. Paul, Minn.) : unit of ticket sales 
agents employed at Edmonton, Winnipeg: 530; 
granted, 653. 



Certification application (Western Terminals 

Limited): unit of longshoremen: granted, 155. 

Dispute (Albert G. Baker Limited): CO. 

appointed, 1149; settlement, 1283. 
Dispute (Canadian Pacific Railway) : employees 
in Merchandise Services Department; settle- 
ment, 53. 
Dispute (Clarke Steamship Company Limited) : 

CO. appointed, 1149; settlement, 1283. 
Dispute (Gaspe Shipping Reg'd.): CO. ap- 
pointed, 1149; settlement, 1283. 
Dispute (Maritime Terminals Inc.) : CO. 

appointed, 1149; settlement, 1283. 
Dispute (National Harbours Board, Montreal) : 

CO. appointed, 1283; settlement, 1392. 
Dispute (Quebec Terminals Limited): CO. 

appointed, 1149; settlement, 1283. 
Interveners, certification applications (Local 
375)— 
Atlantic and Gulf Stevedores Limited, re- 
jected, 331. 
Brown and Ryan Limited, rejected, 331. 
Canadian Pacific Steamships, Limited, rejected, 

331. 
Cullen Stevedoring Company Limited, rejected, 

331. 
Cunard Steamship Company Limited, rejected, 

331. 
Eastern Canada Stevedoring Company Limited, 

rejected, 331. 
Empire Stevedoring Company Limited, re- 
jected, 331. 
Furness Withy and Company Limited, re- 
jected, 331. 
McLean Kennedy, Limited, rejected, 331. 
Montreal and Saint John Stevedore Company, 

Limited, rejected, 331. 
Shipping Federation of Canada, Inc., rejected, 

331. 
Wolfe Stevedores Limited, rejected, 331. 

Railway Brotherhoods, International 
National Legislative Committee — 
Brief, federal Cabinet, 411. 
Campbell, H. E., Secretary, retirement, 1238. 
Gibbons, A. R., Secretary, appointment, 1238. 
Hutchinson, A. A., Chairman — Labour Day 
message, 914; New Year message, 1338. 

Railway, Transport and General Workers, 
Canadian Brotherhood of 

CNR-CBRT consolidated agreement merges 
seniority lists at Lakehead, 911. 

Certification application (Canadian National 
Railways) : system- wide unit of employees of 
various manual and clerical classifications at 
Montreal: 1033. 

Certification application (Coast Cargo Services 
Limited): withdrawn, 443. 

Certification application (Deeks-McBride Lim- 
ited): unit of marine engineers: 834; granted, 
949. 

Certification application (Empire Freightways 
Limited): 157; granted, 331. 

Certification application (Northumberland Fer- 
ries Limited) : unit of deck officers and 



INDEX 



XXXI 



marine engineers aboard S/S Charles A. Dun- 
ning and M/V Lord Selkirk: 1147; granted, 
1147. 

Certification application (Northumberland Fer- 
ries Limited): unit of mates and engineers: 
1033; withdrawn, 1033. 

Certification application (Henry A. Rogers 
Limited): unit of longshoremen: 1033; with- 
drawn, 1148; new application, 1148. 

Dispute (Local 400) (British Columbia Tow- 
boat Owners Association): C.B. appointed, 
444; C.B. fully constituted, 533; C.B. report, 
722; settlement, 1284. 

Dispute (Local 425) (British Columbia Tow- 
boat Owners Association) : CO. appointed, 
53; C.B. appointed, 656; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 836; C.B. report, 1035; settlement 
1284. 

Dispute (Canadian National Hotels, Limited — 
Chateau Laurier Hotel, Ottawa): CO. ap- 
pointed, 1392. 

Dispute (Canadian National Railways, Mul- 
grave, N.S.): CO. appointed, 533; settlement, 
655. 

Dispute (Canadian National Steamship Com- 
pany Limited — Pacific Coast Service) : pursers 
and radio telegraph operators: CO. appointed, 
333; settlement, 655. 

Dispute (Canadian National Steamship Company 
Limited — Pacific Coast Service): (Stewards 
Department) CO. appointed, 333; settlement, 
655. 

Dispute (Tippet-Richardson (Ottawa) Limited) : 
lapsed, 158. 

Dispute (Vancouver Barge Transportation Lim- 
ited): (Local 425) CO. appointed, 836. 

Dispute (Vancouver Hotel Company, Limited — 
Hotel Vancouver): CO. appointed, 1392. 

Dispute (Local 425) (Viking Tugboat Company 
Limited) : CO. appointed, 835. 

Railways See also Canadian Railway Board of 
Adjustment No. 1; Railway Brotherhoods, 
International 

Canadian railways and 17 unions of non-oper- 
ating employees accept conciliation board's 
recommendations, 1008. 

Munroe, Hon. Justice F. Craig, chairman, con- 
ciliation board re dispute between Canadian 
railways and 17 unions, appointed by Minister 
of Labour, 595. 

Railway Brotherhoods, brief, federal Cabinet, 411. 

Work rules revision urged, U.S. Presidential 
Commission, 538. 

Rehabilitation See also Older Workers 
Architectural barriers to the handicapped — 

American studies assist Canadian organizations, 

419. 
Baker Foundation for Blindness Prevention, 

CNIB, 918. 
B.C. school of rehabilitation medicine, 151. 
Campbell, Ian, National Co-ordinator of Civilian 

Rehabilitation . . . awarded citation of United 

States "People to People Program", 1332. 



CCC, recommendations, 151. 

Canadian Conference on Sheltered Employment, 

1270. 
Division on Older Workers, Civilian Rehabilita- 
tion, federal Department of Labour, functions, 

118. 
International activities in rehabilitation, 827. 
International Northern Great Plains Conference 

on Special Education and Rehabilitation, 1132. 
National Advisory Council on the Rehabilitation 

of Disabled Persons, appointment, 498; first 

meeting, 602. 
National Rehabilitation Association, conference. 

UNITED STATES: 1382. 
Number of persons rehabilitated in 1961-62 — 

report, Civilian Rehabilitation Branch, federal 

Department of Labour, 1006. 
"Unlimited Skills Inc.". CANADA: 327. 
Vocational Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons 

Act — federal-provincial officials "chart" future 

of program, 498, 524. 

Religion-Labour Council of Canada 
Convention, 132. 

New Brunswick Federation of Labour, views, 
1361. 

Research 

$l,000,000-subsidy fund by federal Government 
for industrial research, 401. 

Retail Food and Drug Clerks Union 
Legal decision, 349 

Retail, Wholesale and Department Store 
Union 
Legal decisions, 73, 1394. 
Retirement See Older Workers 
Retraining See Adult Education 
Rice and Trimble Limited 

Certification application (Local 987, Teamsters) : 
157; granted, 529. 

Right to Strike See Strikes and Lockouts 
Rio Algom Mines Limited 

Dispute (Local 796, Operating Engineers) 
(Nordic and Milliken Divisions): CO. ap- 
pointed, 533; settlement, 836. 
Dispute (Steel workers) (Nordic and Milliken 
Divisions): CO. appointed, 444; C.B. ap- 
pointed, 533; C.B. fully constituted, 656; C.B. 
report, 851. 

Robertson, P. G. (et al) 

Application for revocation of certification 
(Machinists): 951; rejected, 1032. 

Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited 

Certification application (Packinghouse Work- 
ers): unit of technicians: granted, 1031; 
1033. 

Dispute (Local 326, Packinghouse Workers) : 
CO. appointed, 533; settlement, 836. 

Dispute (Local 416, Packinghouse Workers) : 
C.B. appointed, 158; C.B. fully constituted, 
334; C.B. report, 445. 



XXXII 



INDEX 



Rogers, Henry A., Limited 

Certification application (Railway, Transport and 
General Workers): unit of longshoremen: 
1033; withdrawn, 1148; new application, 1148; 
granted, 1386. 

Certification application (Longshoremen, inter- 
vener) : withdrawn, 1148. 

Royal Commission on Labour-Management Re- 
lations in the Construction Industry 
(Ontario) 
Report, 775. 



"Sabbaticals" See Vacations 
Sabre Freight Lines Limited 

Dispute (Local 605, Teamsters) : lapsed, 158. 

Safety, Industrial See also Workmen's Com- 
pensation 

Chief Inspector of Factories. BRITAIN: annual 
report (1960), 225, 226, 227. 

Industrial Accident Prevention Associations. 
ONTARIO: conference, 1042. 

Legislation enacted in 1962. CANADA: 1349. 

Man. Building Trades Protection Act: amend- 
ments, 1351. 

Man. Employment Standards Act: provisions, 
1352. 

N.B. Factory Act: amendments, 1353; name 
changed to Industrial Safety Act, 1353. 

N.B. Logging Camps Act: provisions, 1353. 

N.B. Mining Act: regulations, 1353. 

N.S. Metalliferous Mines and Quarries Act: 
amendment, 1354. 

Ont. Construction Hoists Act: amendment, 1350. 

Ont. Construction Safety Act: regulations, 1052. 

Ont. Department of Labour Act: amendment 
establishes Labour Safety Council of Ontario, 
1349; regulation, 352. 

Ont. Elevators and Lifts Act: amendments, 1350. 

Ont. Energy Act: new regulations, 1292. 

Ont. Federation of Labour, views, 31. 

Ont. Mining Act: provisions, 1350. 

U.S. Fair Labor Standards Act: Hazardous 
Occupations Order No. 16, 456. 

St. Johns (Iberville) Transport Company 

Limited 
Certification application (Local 106, Teamsters) : 

unit of chauffeurs and dockmen: 332; granted, 

331. 
Certification application (Locals 938 and 106, 

Teamsters) : request for review under Section 

61 (2), 52. 

St. Lawrence Seaway Authority 

Norris, Mr. Justice T. G., Industrial Inquiry 
Commission to investigate SIU, St. Lawrence 
Seaway System boycott, appointment, 908. 

Saskatchewan Federation of Labour 

Convention, 1364. 
Scholarships 

Commonwealth Scholarship and Fellowship Plan, 
Canada offers 125 scholarships, 4. 



Schonning, Gil, Assistant Director, Economics 
and Research Branch, federal Department of 
Labour 
B.C. Conference on Apprenticeship, remarks, 
1343. 

Science See Publications 

Scientific Employees See Professional Manpower 

Scott Misener Steamships Limited 

Certification application (Marine Engineers, in- 
tervener) : unit of marine engineers: rejected, 
51. 
Certification application (Marine Engineers' 
Beneficial Association) : unit of marine en- 
gineers: rejected, 51. 

Seafarers' International Union 

Certification application (Eagle Shipping and 
Investment Company Limited) : withdrawn, 53. 

Certification application (Kent Line Limited: 
Irving Oil Company): unit of marine en- 
gineers: 1387. 

Certification application (Kent Line Limited: 
Irving Oil Company) : unit of unlicensed em- 
ployees, 1387. 

Certification application (Porter Shipping Limi- 
ted) : unit of marine engineers: rejected, 156. 

Certification application (Porter Shipping 
Limited): unit of unlicensed personnel: 
rejected, 156, 1386. 

Dispute (Association of Lake Carriers) : CO. 
appointed, 333; C.B. appointed, 444; C.B. 
fully constituted, 444: C.B. report, 534. 

Dispute (British Columbia Towboat Owners 
Association) : CO. appointed, 444; C.B. ap- 
pointed, 656; C.B. fully constituted, 836; C.B. 
report, 1150; settlement, 1284. 

Dispute (Canadian National Steamship Com- 
pany Limited — Pacific Coast Service) : C.B. 
appointed, 158; C.B. fully constituted, 334; 
C.B. report, 535; settlement, 973. 

Dispute (Canadian Pacific Railway Company) 
(S.S. Princess Helene): CO. appointed, 951. 

Dispute (C H. Cates and Sons) : C.B. ap- 
pointed, 656; C.B. fully constituted, 836; C.B. 
report, 1150; settlement, 1284. 

Dispute (M. R. Cliff): C.B. appointed, 656; 
C.B. fully constituted, 836; C.B. report, 1150; 
settlement, 1284. 

Dispute (Commercial Cable Company) : un- 
licensed personnel and licensed engineers on 
S.S. Cable Guardian: C.B. report, 57. 

Dispute (Davie Transportation Limited) : C.B. 
report, 338. 

Dispute (Deeks-McBride) : C.B. appointed, 656; 
C.B. fully constituted, 836; C.B. report, 1150; 
settlement, 1284. 

Dispute (Dominion Steel and Coal Corporation) 
(Dominion Shipping Division) : C.B. fully 
constituted, 54; C.B. report, 727; settlement, 
1284. 

Dispute (Federal Commerce and Navigation 
Company Limited): CB. report, 66. 

Dispute (Gulf of Georgia Towing) : C.B. ap- 
pointed, 656; C.B. fully constituted, 836; C.B. 
report, 1150; settlement, 1284. 



INDEX 



XXXIII 



Dispute (Harbour Services) : C.B. appointed, 
656; C.B. fully constituted, 836; C.B. report, 
1150; settlement, 1284. 

Dispute (Kingcome Navigation Company) : C.B. 
appointed, 656; C.B. fully constituted, 836; 
C.B. report, 1150; settlement, 1284. 

Dispute (Leitch Transport Limited) : CO. 
appointed, 333; C.B. appointed, 444; C.B. 
fully constituted, 444; C.B. report, 534. 

Dispute (McKenzie Barge Company): C.B. 
appointed, 656; C.B. fully constituted, 836; 
C.B. report, 1150; settlement, 1284. 

Dispute (Norris Grain Company) (Steamship 
Division) : CO. appointed, 333; C.B. ap- 
pointed, 444; C.B. fully constituted, 444; C.B. 
report, 534. 

Dispute (Quatsino Navigation): C.B. appointed, 
656; C.B. fully constituted, 836; C.B. report, 
1150; settlement, 1284. 

Dispute (Quebec Paper Sales and Transporta- 
tion Company Limited) : C.B. report, 60. 

Dispute (Straits Towing) : C.B. appointed, 656; 
C.B. fully constituted, 836; report of Board, 
1150; settlement, 1284. 

Dispute (Guy Tombs Marine Services Limited) : 
C.B. report, 338. 

Dispute (Upper Lakes Shipping Limited) : CO. 
appointed, 333; C.B. appointed, 444; C.B. fully 
constituted, 444; C.B. report 534. 

Intervener, certification application (Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company — Great Lakes Steam- 
ships) : unit of unlicensed employees aboard 
S.S. Keewatin and S.S. Assiniboia: granted, 
155. 

Intervener, certification application (Coast 
Cargo Services Limited): withdrawn, 443. 

Intervener, certification application (Owen 
Sound Transportation Company Limited): 
unit of unlicensed personnel: rejected, 156. 

Intervener, certification application (Quebec 
North Shore and Labrador Railway Com- 
pany) : unit of unlicensed employees on M.V. 
Inland: granted, 331. 

Intervener, certification application (Trans-Lake 
Shipping Limited) : unit of unlicensed em- 
ployees on S.S. Hilda Marianne: granted, 155. 

Legal decision, 863. 

Norris, Mr. Justice T. G., Industrial Inquiry 
Commission to investigate SIU, St. Lawrence 
Seaway System boycott, appointment, 908. 

SIU charge against Canadian lake vessel re- 
jected by U.S. National Labor Relations 
Board, 597. 

Separatism 

Que. Federation of Labour, views, 136. 

Sheltered Employment 

Canadian Conference on Sheltered Employment, 
1023, 1270. 

Shepherd, Lorne (et al) 

Certification application (Theatrical Stage Em- 
ployees) : application for revocation, 655; 
granted, 834. 

Shipping 

CNTU, recommendations, 408. 

Nfld. Federation of Labour, views, 910. 



Shipping Federation of British Columbia 
Dispute (Longshoremen and Warehousemen) 
(Canadian Coast Negotiating Committee) : 
CO. appointed, 1034; C.B. appointed, 1149. 

Shipping Federation of Canada Inc. 

Certification application (Local 375, Longshore- 
men) : rejected, 331. 

Certification application (Local 375, Railway 
and Steamship Clerks, intervener) : rejected, 
331. 

Dispute (Local 1657, Longshoremen) : checkers 
and cargo repairmen: C.B. report, 341; settle- 
ment, 534. 

Shops See Factories 

Sickness See Health, Industrial 

Sickness Survey See Health, Industrial 

Skilled Manpower See Training 

Smith Transport Limited 

Certification application (Local 131, Office Em- 
ployees): unit of office employees: 834; with- 
drawn, 951. 
Dispute (Local 938, Teamsters) : CO. appointed, 
951; C.B. appointed, 1149; C.B. fully con- 
stituted, 1149. 

Social Aid See Social Assistance 
Social Allowances See Social Assistance 
Social Assistance 

Alta. Fire Prevention Act: regulations govern- 
ing homes for aged, 791. 

Alta. Public Welfare Act: regulations and 
amendments, 787. 

General assistance legislation, changes, Novem- 
ber 1960-December 1961: Alberta, Manitoba, 
Newfoundland, Ontario, Quebec, Saskatche- 
wan, 783. 

Man. Social Allowances Act: regulations, 786. 

N.B. Auxiliary Homes Act: provisions, 789. 

N.B. Social Assistance Act: amendment re 
mothers' allowances, 788. 

Nfld. Health and Public Welfare Act: amend- 
ment, 1354. 

Nfld. Social Assistance Act (1954): regulations, 
783. 

N.S. Social Assistance Act: amendment, 788; 
regulation, 789. 

Ont. General Welfare Assistance Act: regula- 
tions and amendments, 785. 

Ont. Homes for the Aged Act: amendment, 790. 

Ont. Mothers' and Dependent Children's Allow- 
ances Act: regulations, 788. 

Que. Needy Mothers' Assistance Act: amend- 
ment, 788. 

Sask. Social Aid Act: amended Regulations for 
Aid to Dependent Families, 788; regulations, 
786. 

Social Legislation See also Labour Laws and 

Regulations 
Changes in legislation forecast in Throne Speech, 

120. 
ILO convention concerning basic aims and 

standards of social policy, text, 933. 



xxxrv 



INDEX 



Social Security 

CLC Social Security Committee, report, 616. 

CLC, views, 403. 

ILO convention concerning equality of treat- 
ment of nationals and non-nationals in social 
security, text, 936. 

Soo-Security Motorways Limited 

Dispute (Local 979, Teamsters) : CO. appointed, 
53; settlement, 334. 

Standard of Living 

ILO convention concerning basic aims and 
standards of social policy — improvement of 
standards of living, text, 933. 

Starr, Hon. Michael, Federal Minister of Labour 
Comments, statements, etc. — 

Apprenticeship Training Advisory Committee, 
300. 

Canadian Conference on Education, 400. 

CCA National Labour Relations Conference, 
1333. 

CLC brief, reply, 406. 

CLC convention, 611. 

CNTU brief, reply, 409. 

Garment Workers' Union, banquet, 280. 

Labour Day message, 912. 

National Conference on Agricultural Train- 
ing, 1242. 

New Year message, 1336. 

Opens new training facilities for unemployed 
at Cornwall, 1333. 

Railway Brotherhoods' brief, reply, 413. 

Steel Industry 

N.S. Federation of Labour, views, 415. 

Que. Federation of Labour, recommendations, 

414. 
Two-year agreement, USWA and 11 major steel 

firms. UNITED STATES: 499. 

Steelworkers of America, United 

Certification application (Canadian Arsenals 
Limited) (Small Arms Division): unit of 
production employees: 52, representation vote, 
155; granted, 331. 

Certification application (Local 5115) (North- 
ern Dock and Warehouse Company Limited) : 
unit of warehousemen, forklift operators and 
labourers: 1148; granted, 1147. 

Dispute (Canadian Arsenals Limited) (Gun Am- 
munition Division): CO. appointed, 333; 
settlement, 444. 

Dispute (Canadian Arsenals Limited) (Small 
Arms Division): CO. appointed, 835; settle- 
ment, 951. 

Dispute (Rio Algom Mines Limited) (Milliken 
and Nordic Divisions) : CO. appointed, 444; 
CB. appointed, 533; CB. fully constituted, 
656. 

Policy conference, 621. 

"Sabbaticals" for long-service employees, Ameri- 
can Can Company, Continental Can Com- 
pany, in United States, Puerto Rico and Can- 
ada, 1237. 

Shorter work week, 290. 

Two-year agreement, USWA and 11 major steel 
firms. UNITED STATES: 499. 



Stone and Allied Products Workers of Amer- 
ica, United 
Legal decision, 345. 
Straits Towing 
Dispute (Seafarers): CB. appointed, 656; CB. 
fully constituted, 836; CB. report, 1150; 
settlement, 1284. 

Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach 
Employees of America, Amalgamated Asso- 
ciation of 

Certification application (Division 591) (Hull 
City Transport Limited) : unit of bus oper- 
ators and garage employees: 52; granted, 155. 

Certification application (Division 591) (Hull 
Metropolitan Transport Limited) : unit of bus 
operators and garage employees: 52; granted, 
155. 

Strdces and Lockouts 

Auto Workers' strike, Kohler Company, Sheboy- 
gan, Wis., ended after 8i years, 1366. 
Brandon Union Group. CANADA: group of 

five construction unions which organized 

strikes and demonstrations in Toronto, Ont., 

reduced to three, 1236. 
B.C. Supreme Court upholds union's right to 

picket all operations of a company provided 

that strike is a legal one, 349. 
Building Trades Council of the Metropolitan 

Area (CNTU) (Montreal) agrees not to 

strike . . . during 1967 World air, 1374. 
CLC convention, resolutions re right to strike, 

607. 
CNTU, views, 1377. 
N.B. Supreme Court (Appeal Division) upholds 

injunction restraining picketing and granting 

of damages caused by illegal strike, 540. 
N.S. Supreme Court enjoins picketing, awards 

damages to company because voting on strike 

did not comply with Act, 446. 
Ont. High Court rules dismissal of employees 

on legal strike is unlawful under Ontario 

Labour Relations Act, 347. 
P.E.I. Industrial Relations Act: regulations, 1259. 
Re wage insurance, 1377. 
Statistics: "G-Strikes and Lockouts" (monthly 

feature). 
Steelworkers, views, policy conference, 621. 
Supreme Court of Canada upholds conviction 

of company for discharging employees on 

strike called in compliance with Act, 1043. 
Tritschler, Mr. Justice G. E., report into strike 

at Brandon Packers Limited, Brandon, Man., 

4, 123. 

Sunday Observance 
CNTU, views, 1377. 

Swerdlow, Max, Director of Education, Canadian 
Labour Congress 
Alta. Federation of Labour convention, remarks, 
1359. 

Sydney and Louisburg Railway Company 

Certification application (Railroad Trainmen ) : 
unit of trainmen in yard and road service: 
granted, 155. 



INDEX 



XXXV 



Dispute (Associated Non-operating Unions) : 
C.B. appointed, 533; C.B. fully constituted, 
656; C.B. report, 1181; settlement after C.B. 
procedure, 1150. 

Dispute (Lodge No. 684, Railroad Trainmen): 
CO. appointed, 533; C.B. appointed, 973; 
C.B. fully constituted, 1034; C.B. report, 1180; 
settlement after C.B. procedure, 1150. 

Syndicat National des Chauffeurs de Camion 
du Quebec 
Certification application (Montreal Ottawa Ex- 
press Limited) : unit of truck drivers, dock- 
men, warehousemen and helpers: 950; rejected, 
1031. 



Taggart Service Limited 

Certification application (Locals 106, 938 and 91, 
Teamsters) : unit of city and highway drivers 
and dockmen working in and out of Montreal, 
Toronto, Kingston, Perth, Renfrew, Pembroke, 
Ottawa and Hawkesbury: 442; representation 
vote, 529. 

Certification application (Locals 106, 938 and 
91, Taggart Service Limited Employees' Asso- 
ciation, intervener) : representation vote, 529; 
rejected, 654. 

Taggart Service Limited Employees' 
Association 
Intervener, certification application (Locals 106, 
938 and 91) (Taggart Service Limited): 
representation vote, 529; rejected, 654. 
Tank Truck Transport Limited 

Certification application (Locals 91, 938 and 
880, Teamsters): unit of drivers: 1283; with- 
drawn, 1387. 

Taxation 

CCC suggests tax incentives to spur economy, 
281. 

CCA, views, 397. 

CLC, recommendations, 404; resolution, 617. 

CMA, Taxation Conference at general meeting, 
823. 

Que. Corporation Tax Act: regulation re limited- 
dividend housing, 790. 

Railway Brotherhoods, recommendation, 412. 

U.S. Presidential Advisory Committee on Labor- 
Management Policy urges corporate tax cut, 
1333. 

Teamwork in Industry (monthly feature) 
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America, International Bro- 
therhood of 

AFL-CIO, views, 39. 

Certification application (Local 514) (Adby 
Construction and Transport Limited) : unit of 
truck drivers: 1033. 

Certification application (Local 885) (BlackBall 
Freight Service): unit of dockmen and ware- 
housemen: granted, 1031; See also 950. 

Certification application (Local 885) (BlackBall 
Transport Incorporated) : unit of dockmen and 
warehousemen: 950; granted, 1031. 



Certification application (Local 605) (Canadian 
Freightways Limited) : 157; withdrawn, 333. 

Certification application (Locals 880, 979, 987, 
181 and 605) (Canadian Freightways Lim- 
ited) : unit of employees working in and out 
of Yukon Territory, British Columbia, Alberta, 
Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Ontario: 442; 
granted, 653. 

Certification application (Local 419) (De Luxe 
Transportation Limited) : unit of garage em- 
ployees: granted, 949; 950. 

Certification application (Local 979) (East- West 
Transport Limited) : granted, 155. 

Certification application (Local 605) (Gill Inter- 
provincial Lines Limited); unit of employees 
including owner-drivers: 157; granted, 529; 
reasons for judgment, 531. 

Certification application (Local 987) Gossett 
and Sons Transport Limited) : 157; granted, 
529. 

Certification application (Local 879) (Hill the 
Mover (Canada) Limited) : unit of employees 
at North Stoney Creek, Ont.: 655; withdrawn, 
834. 

Certification application (Local 91) (McGregor 
the Mover Limited) : representation vote, 155; 
rejected, 331. 

Certification application (Local 605) (Millar 
and Brown Limited) : 157; withdrawn, 333. 

Certification application (Locals 987, 181 and 
605) (Millar and Brown Limited): 442; 
granted, 653. 

Certification application (Local 927) (North 
American Van Lines (Atlantic) Limited) : re- 
quest for review under Section 61 (2), 52; 
denied, 157. 

Certification application (Locals 362, 979, 938 
and 605) (Pacific Inland Express Limited): 
unit of employees including owner-drivers: 
654. 

Certification application (Locals 362, 979, 938 
and 31) (Pacific Inland Express Limited): 
representation vote, 1386; reasons for judg- 
ment, 1388. 

Certification application (Local 605) (Pacific 
Inland Express Limited): 157; withdrawn, 
333. 

Certification application (Local 106) (Piette 
Transport Inc.): unit of truck drivers and 
mechanics: 442; granted, 653. 

Certification application (Local 880) (Pollard 
Bros. Limited) : 332; withdrawn, 443. 

Certification application (Local 987) (Rice and 
Trimble Limited): 157; granted, 529. 

Certification application (Local 106) (St. Johns 
(Iberville) Transport Company Limited): unit 
of chauffeurs and dockmen: 332: granted, 
331. 

Certification application (Locals 938 and 106) 
(St. Johns (Iberville) Transport Limited): 
request for review under Section 61 (2), 52. 

Certification application (Locals 106, 938 and 
91) (Taggart Service Limited): unit of city 
and highway drivers and dockmen working in 
and out of Montreal, Toronto, Kingston, 
Perth, Renfrew, Pembroke, Ottawa and 
Hawkesbury: 442; representation vote, 529; 
rejected, 654. 



XXXVI 



INDEX 



Certification application (Locals 91, 938 and 
880) (Tank Truck Transport Limited): unit 
of drivers: 1283; withdrawn, 1387. 

Certification application (Local 987) (Tiger 
Transfer Limited) : unit of truck drivers and 
mechanics: 442; representation vote, 653; 
granted, 834. 

Certification application (Locals 106, 938 and 
91) (Toronto, Ottawa Valley Express Lim- 
ited) : unit of drivers and mechanics working 
in and out of Pembroke, Toronto and Mont- 
real: 442; granted, 653. 

Certification application (Local 605) (Zenith 
Transport Limited): unit of drivers: 52; repre- 
sentation vote, 155; granted, 331. 

Dispute (Local 879) (Active Cartage Limited): 
CO. appointed, 951; settlement, 1284. 

Dispute (Local 419) (H. W. Bacon Limited): 
C.B. report, 54; settlement, 54. 

Dispute (Locals 76 and 927) (Barnhill's Trans- 
fer Limited): C.B. report, 158, 210; settle- 
ment, 158. 

Dispute (Local 419) (John N. Brocklesby 
Transport Limited) : CO. appointed, 1283. 

Dispute (Local 605) (Canadian Freightways 
Limited): CO. appointed, 53; lapsed, 836. 

Dispute (Local 419) (De Luxe Transportation 
Limited): CO. appointed, 1283. 

Dispute (Local 31) (Gill Interprovincial Lines 
Limited): CO. appointed, 1283. 

Dispute (Local 605) (Gill Interprovincial Lines 
Limited) : settlement, 53. 

Dispute (Local 938) (Hanson Transport Com- 
pany Limited): CO. appointed, 951; C.B. 
appointed, 1149; C.B. fully constituted, 1149. 

Dispute (Local 419) (Hill the Mover (Canada) 
Limited): employees at Ottawa and Toronto 
terminals: CO. appointed, 1392. 

Dispute (Local 938) (Inter-City Truck Lines 
Limited): CO. appointed, 951; C.B. appointed, 
1149; C.B. fully constituted, 1149. 

Dispute (Local 979) (Leamington Transport 
(Western) Limited): CO. appointed, 655; 
settlement, 1034. 

Dispute (Local 938) (The Walter Little Lim- 
ited): CO. appointed, 951; C.B. appointed, 
1149; C.B. fully constituted, 1149. 

Dispute (Local 514) (McCabe Grain Company 
Limited) : lapsed, 158. 

Dispute (Local 938) (McKinlay Transport Lim- 
ited): CO. appointed, 951. 

Dispute (Locals 987, 181 and 605) (Millar and 
Brown Limited): CO. appointed, 951; settle- 
ment, 1034. 

Dispute (Local 106) (Motor Transport Indus- 
trial Relations): C.B. appointed, 158; C.B. 
report, 724. 

Dispute (Locals 879, 880 and 938) (Motor 
Transport Industrial Relations Bureau) : CO. 
appointed, 53; C.B. appointed, 444; C.B. fully 
constituted, 534; C.B. report, 837; strike 
action following Board procedure, 836; settle- 
ment after strike after Board procedure, 1034. 

Dispute (Local 880) (Motor Transport Indus- 
trial Relations Bureau): C.B. report, 68; 
strike after Board procedure, 158; settlement 
after Board procedure, 334. 



Dispute (Local 938) (Motor Transport Indus- 
trial Relations Bureau): CO. appointed, 951; 
C.B. appointed, 1149. 

Dispute (Local 938) (Motorways Limited): 
C.B. appointed, 1149; C.B. fully constituted, 
1149. 

Dispute (Local 938) (The Overland Express 
Limited): CO. appointed, 951; C.B. appointed, 
1149; C.B. fully constituted, 1149. 

Dispute (Local 106) (Piette Transport Inc.): 
CO. appointed, 1149; settlement, 1283. 

Dispute (Local 605) (Sabre Freight Lines Lim- 
ited): lapsed, 158. 

Dispute (Local 938) (Smith Transport Limited): 
CO. appointed, 951; C.B. appointed, 1149; 
C.B. fully constituted, 1149. 

Dispute (Local 979) (Soo-Security Motorways 
Limited): CO. appointed, 53; settlement, 334. 

Intervener, certification application (Local 106) 
(Montreal Ottawa Express Limited) : rejected, 
1031. 

Technical and Vocational Training Assistance 
Act 
Development of technical, vocational training 
program, 1330. 

Technical Assistance See Colombo Plan 

Technical Education See Education 

Technical Employees See Professional Man- 
power 

Technical Training See Training; Unemploy- 
ment 

Technological Change See Automation 

Technological Unemployment See Unemploy- 
ment 

Telephone Workers of British Columbia, Fed- 
eration of 

Dispute (British Columbia Telephone Company) 
(traffic and clerical divisions) : CO. appointed, 
835; settlement, 951. 

Intervener, certification application (British 
Columbia Telephone Company) : withdrawn, 
1149. 

Termination of Employment 

Man. Employment Standards Act: amendment, 
1018. 

Textile Industry 

Primary Textile Industry. Wages and Hours in 
1960. CANADA: 282. 

Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Pic- 
ture Machine Operators of the United 
States and Canada, International Alliance 
of 

Certification application (Atlantic Broadcasters 
Limited) : request for review under Section 
61 (2), 53; denied, 157. 

Certification application (Local 848) (Atlantic 
Broadcasters Limited) : 332; granted, 529. 

Certification application (Local 848) (Atlantic 
Television Company Limited) : 529; repre- 
sentation vote, 654; rejected, 834. 



INDEX 



XXXVII 



Certification application (Frontenac Broadcast- 
ing Company Limited) : application for revoca- 
tion, 655; granted, 834. 

Certification application (Lome Shepherd, et al) : 
application for revocation, 655; granted, 834. 

Dispute (Local 873) (Baton Aldred Rogers 
Broadcasting Limited): CO. appointed, 655; 
settlement, 973. 

Dispute (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) : 
CO. appointed, 333; settlement, 444. 

Dispute (Cape Breton Broadcasters Limited) : 
CO. appointed, 1149; settlement, 1283. 

Dispute (Frontenac Broadcasting Company) : 
CB. fully constituted, 53; CB. report, 335. 

Dispute (Local 848) (Hector Broadcasting 
Company Limited) : CO. appointed, 158; set- 
tlement, 333. 

Intervener, certification application (Canadian 
Marconi Company) : unit of production em- 
ployees: granted, 50. 

Legal decision, 862. 

Tiger Transfer Limited 

Certification application (Local 987, Teamsters) : 
unit of truck drivers and mechanics: 442; 
representation vote, 653; granted, 834. 

Certification application (Local 987, Team- 
sters) (Ronald Patterson, et al, interveners) : 
representation vote, 653. 

Tippet-Richardson (Ottawa) Limited 

Dispute (Railway, Transport and General 
Workers): lapsed, 158. 

Tombs, Guy, Marine Services Limited 
Dispute (Seafarers) : CB. report, 338. 

Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway Com- 
pany 

Dispute (Associated Non-operating Unions) : 
CB. appointed, 533; CB. fully constituted, 
656; CB. report, 1181; settlement after CB. 
procedure, 1150. 

Dispute (Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen) : 
CO. appointed, 1034; settlement, 1392. 

Toronto Harbour Commissioners 
Certification application (Communications Work- 
ers): unit of berthing masters: 1033; with- 
drawn, 1148. 

Toronto Ottawa Valley Express Limited 
Certification application (Locals 106, 938 and 
91, Teamsters): unit of drivers and mechanics 
working in and out of Pembroke, Toronto and 
Montreal: 442; granted, 653. 

Trade 

B.C. Federation of Labour, views re Common 

Market, 1362. 
Man. Federation of Labour, views re Common 

Market, 1363. 

Trade Analyses See Trade Standards 
Trade and Commerce, Department of 

Hees, Hon. George, Minister, reply CNTU brief, 

409. 
National Industrial Expansion Conference, 1103. 
Roberts, James A., Deputy Minister, address, 
meeting Canadian Chamber of Commerce, 
1114. 



Trade Schools See Vocational Education 
Trade Standards 

Trade analyses, list. CANADA: 299. 
Trade Unions See Labour Unions 
Trades Union Congress (Great Britain) : 

Meeting, 94th, 1268. 

Report to Government's Committee on Higher 
Education, 121. 

Scholarship, International Institute for Labour 
Statistics, 153. 

Tradesmen's Qualification See Apprenticeship 

Training See also Agriculture 

Apprenticeship Training Advisory Committee. 
CANADA: 13th meeting, 299; 14th meeting, 
1339. 

Canadian legislation on women's work, com- 
parison with ILO standards, 526. 

Cost of capital projects approved under Techni- 
cal and Vocational Training Agreement be- 
tween federal and provincial governments, 770. 

Discussed in study prepared for Canadian Con- 
ference on Education by Director, Canadian 
Association for Adult Education, 501. 

Employee training programs sponsored by in- 
dustrial establishments. UNITED STATES: 
983. 

ILO Convention concerning basic aims and 
standards of social policy — education and 
training, text, 935. 

ILO Recommendation concerning vocational 
training, text, 941. 

Manpower Training Advisory Council, estab- 
lishment. NOVA SCOTIA: 280. 

Meeting manpower challenge of the 1960's — 
development of technical and vocational train- 
ing program. CANADA: 1330. 

National Conference on Agricultural Training, 
1241. 

National Technical and Vocational Training Ad- 
visory Council, meeting, 598. 

Technical and Vocational Training in Canada, 
quarterly publication, federal Department of 
Labour, 911. 

Technical training, definition of. CANADA: 505. 

Technological Changes and Skilled Manpower: 
Electronic Data Processing Occupations in a 
Large Insurance Company, federal Department 
of Labour, 15. 

Training unemployed — 

Facilities for, Cornwall, 1333. 
Federal-provincial program, 278, 298. 
During 1961-62, 906. 

Vocational and Technical Training for Girls, 
federal Department of Labour, 96. 

Vocational Training Needs in Canadian Agricul- 
ture, federal Department of Labour, 911. 

Vocational Training of Disabled Persons Act, 
43. 

Transair Limited 

Certification application (Flight Attendants): 

unit of flight attendants: 1283. 
Certification application (Machinists) : request 

for review of earlier decision, 1387. 



XXXVIII 



INDEX 



Trans-Canada Air Lines 
Application for revocation of certification 

(Machinists): 951; rejected, 1032. 
Dispute (Pilots) : settlement, 334. 
Dispute (TCA Sales Employees Association): 

settlement, 53. 

Trans-Canada Air Lines Sales Employees 
Association 
Dispute (Trans-Canada Airlines): settlement, 
53. 

Trans-Canada Communications Limited 
Certification application (Broadcast Employees) : 
1033; representation vote, 1147; rejected, 
1386. 

Trans-Lake Shipping Limited 

Certification application (Maritime Union): unit 
of unlicensed personnel on S.S. Hilda Mar- 
ianne: 52; granted, 155. 

Certification application (Seafarers, intervener): 
unit of unlicensed employees aboard S.S. 
Hilda Marianne: granted, 155. 

Transfer of Plants See Factories 
Transport, Department of 

Balcer, Hon. Leon, Minister, reply, CNTU brief, 
409. 

Transportation 
Railway Brotherhoods, views, national transporta- 
tion policy, 412. 

Tritschler, Mr. Justice G. E. 
Report, strike at Brandon Packers Limited, 
Brandon, Man., 4, 123. 

Twin City Broadcasting Company Limited 
Certification application (Broadcast Employees) : 
1148; granted, 1386. 



U 



Umpire See Unemployment Insurance Act 

Unemployment See also Layoffs; Training; 
Termination of Employment. 

B.C. Federation of Labour, views, 4. 

Collective bargaining and technological unem- 
ployment, Industrial Union Department (AFL- 
CIO), 1009. 

Committee established to find employment for 
about 1,000,000 youths. UNITED STATES: 
3; first report, 236. 

CNTU, views, 36, 408. 

"Cybernation: The Silent Conquest", mass un- 
employment and social unrest predicted as 
result of automation and computers. UNITED 
STATES: 326. 

Electronic data processing, effect on clerical 
employment, Dr. John C. McDonald, federal 
Department of Labour, 326. 

Employment Review: Employment and Unem- 
ployment (monthly feature) 

International comparisons of unemployment, 
1370. 

Measuring unemployment, method. UNITED 
STATES: 2. 



N.S. Federation of Labour, views, 415. 

Presidential Advisory Committee on Labor- 
Management Policy, conclusion on automa- 
tion. UNITED STATES: 324. 

Que. Federation of Labour, 414. 

Retraining unemployed, Canadian Conference 
on Education, 503. 

Statistics: "A — Labour Force" (monthly feature). 

The Economy of the Atlantic Region in Per- 
spective, booklet issued by Atlantic Provinces 
Economic Council, 308. 

Training facilities, Cornwall, Ont., 1333. 

Training program, federal-provincial, 278, 298. 

Training program, 1961-62, under Technical and 
Vocational Training Assistance Act, 906. 

Training unemployed, discussion, National Tech- 
nical and Vocational Training Advisory 
Council, 599. 

Unemployment Insurance 

CLC Social Security Committee report, 616. 
Measure re fund proposed in Throne Speech, 

120. 
Railway Brotherhoods, views, 411. 
Statistics: "E — Unemployment Insurance" 

(monthly feature). 
Unemployment Insurance Fund (monthly 

report). 

Unemployment Insurance Act 
Decisions of Umpire — 

CUB 1891, 84 

CUB 1894, 85 

CUB 1906, 232 

CUB 1909, 355 

CUB 1916, 357 

CUB 1923, 460 

CUB 1925, 461 

CUB 1927, 548 

CUB 1942, 868 

CUB 1944, 869 

CUB 1956, 870 

CUB 1958, 968 

CUB 1991, 970 

CUB 2003, 971 

CUB 2008, 1059 

CUB 2022, 1061 

CUB 2025, 1196 

CUB 2036, 1197 

CUB 2039, 1294 

CUB 2049, 1402 

CUB 2057, 1403 
Operation of, (monthly report) 

Unemployment Insurance Advisory Commit- 
tee 
Annual report (1962), 1247. 
Unemployment Insurance Commission 
Peebles, Dr. Allon, first Executive Director, 
death of, 398. 

Unemployment, Seasonal See Municipal Winter 
Works 

Unfair Labour Practices See also Discrimina- 
tion 
SIU charge against Canadian lake vessel re- 
jected, U.S. National Labor Relations Board, 
597. 



INDEX 



XXXIX 



Man. Labour Relations Act: amendments, 1250. 
McKinnon Report on Labour Legislation. NOVA 

SCOTIA: 508. 
Pledge to eliminate discrimination, 120 AFL- 

CIO unions, 1335. 
P.E.I. Industrial Relations Act: regulations, 1257. 

Union Dues 

B.C. Court of Appeal upholds constitutional 

validity of legislation banning use of union 

dues for political purposes, 1184. 
B.C. Supreme Court upholds constitutional 

validity of legislation banning use of union 

dues for political purposes, 219. 
CLC, recommendation, 404. 
Ont. High Court upholds validity of union dues 

agreement that was collateral to collective 

agreement in force, 450. 
Que. Court of Queen's Bench upholds validity 

of union dues agreement between employer 

and certified bargaining agents, 956. 
Sask. Court of Appeal finds company not guilty 

of unfair practices when it refused to deduct 

union dues from wages, 1288. 

Union Jurisdiction See Raiding 
Union Label 

CLC, Union Label Trades Department, con- 
vention, 620. 

Union Raiding See Raiding 
Union Security 

P.E.I. Industrial Relations Act: regulations, 1257. 
Union Shop 

Union shop vote, proposed by U.S. Presidential 
fact-finding board, fails to win majority sup- 
port, 1334. 

United Grain Growers Limited 
Certification application (Local 333, Grain 

Workers, intervener) : request for review under 

Section 61 (2) denied, 52. 
Certification application (Local 882, Operating 

Engineers) : request for review under Section 

61 (2) denied, 52. 

United Nations 
CLC, views, 405. 

United Nations Commission on the Status of 
Women 
Recommendations concerning day nurseries sub- 
mitted by International Children's Centre, 829, 
920. 

Universities See Education; Queen's Univer- 
sity; University of Montreal 

University of Montreal 
Participation in establishment of Canadian 
Workers' College, 320. 

Unlimited Skills Inc. 

Activities, 327. 
Upper Lakes Shipping Limited 

Dispute (Local 23736, CLC): employees in 

Grain Elevator Division: settlement, 53. 
Dispute (Seafarers): CO. appointed, 333; C.B. 
appointed, 444; C.B. fully constituted, 444; 
C.B. report, 534. 



Upper Ottawa Improvement Company 
Certification application (Woodworkers) : 950; 
granted, 1031. 



Vacations 

Alta. Federation of Labour, views, 1358. 

B.C. Factories Act: regulation, 865. 

B.C. Municipal Act: regulation, 865. 

CLC, recommendation, 404. 

Goldenberg Report — recommendations of On- 
tario Royal Commission on Labour-Manage- 
ment Relations in the Construction Industry, 
782. 

Man. Vacations with Pay Act: amendments, 
1019. 

N.B. Vacation Pay Act: regulations, 1018. 

Que. Minimum Wage Act: vacations with pay 
order, 1056. 

"Sabbaticals" for long-service employees of 
American Can Company and the Continental 
Can Company in the United States, Puerto 
Rico and Canada, 1237. 

Vancouver Barge Transportation Limited 
Dispute (Merchant Service) : CO. appointed, 

836; settlement, 1034. 
Dispute (Local 425, Railway, Transport and 

General Workers) : CO. appointed, 836. 

Vancouver Hotel Company, Limited 

Dispute (Hotel Vancouver) (Railway, Transport 
and General Workers) CO. appointed, 1392. 

Vantel Broadcasting Company Limited 

Certification application (Local 115, American 
Newspaper Guild) : complaint under Section 
43 of Act, 53. 

Viking Tugboat Company Limited 

Dispute (Local 425, Railway, Transport and 
General Workers) : CO. appointed, 835. 

Vocational Education 

Discussed in study prepared for Canadian Con- 
ference on Education, 502. 

Ont. Trade Schools Regulation Act: regulations, 
455, 1056. 

Vocational Guidance 

Discussed in study prepared for Canadian 

Conference on Education, 502. 
Electrical and Electronic Occupations, federal 

Department of Labour, 1011. - 

Vocational Rehabilitation See Rehabilitation 
Vocational Training See Training 
Vocational Training of Disabled Persons Act 

Proclamation, 43. 

Federal-provincial officials "chart" future of 
program, 498, 524. 



W 



Wage Insurance 
CNTU, re establishment of fund to assist 
strikers, 1377. 



XL 



INDEX 



Wage Recovery 

B.C. Payment of Wages Act: regulations, 1015. 
Man. Employment Standards Act: amendments, 

1017. 
Ont. Master and Servant Act: amendments, 1017. 

Wages and Salaries See also Equal Pay for 
Equal Work; Fair Wages; Textile Industry 

B.C. Payment of Wages Act: regulations, 1015. 

Employment and Earnings in the Scientific and 
Technical Professions, 1958-1961, federal De- 
partment of Labour, 1308. 

Employment in Canada, 1961 — wages and 
working conditions, federal Department of 
Labour, 5, 6. 

Goldenberg Report — recommendations of Ontario 
Royal Commission on Labour-Management 
Relations in the Construction Industry, 782. 

Industrial wages in 1961. BRITAIN: 282. 

ILO convention concerning basic aims and 
standards of social policy — remuneration of 
workers and related questions, text, 934. 

Man. Employment Standards Act: amendments, 
1017. 

No wage increase first year of contract, two- 
year agreement USWA and 11 major steel 
firms. UNITED STATES: 499. 

Ont. Master and Servant Act: amendments, 
1017. 

Sask. Employees Wage Act (1961): regulation, 
224. 

Statistics: "C — Employment, Hours and Earn- 
ings" (monthly feature). 

Wage increases in the United States in 1961, 
443; in 1962, 1034. 

Wage Rates, Salaries and Hours of Labour, 
federal Department of Labour, Report No. 
43, 2; Report No. 44, 1107. 

Women Workers. DENMARK: 152. 

Yukon Territory Labour Provisions Ordinance: 
amendments, 1018. 

Walter, John F., Brotherhood of Locomotive En- 
gineers 
Assistant Grand Chief Engineer and National 
Legislative Representative, appointment, 1238. 

Welfare See Blindness Allowances; Disabled Per- 
sons Allowances; Old Age Assistance; Public 
Welfare 

Western Ontario Broadcasting Company 
Limited 
Certification application (Broadcast Employees) 
employees in News and Photographic Depart- 
ment: 951; granted, 1031. 

Western Terminals Limited 
Certification application (Railway and Steam- 
ship Clerks): unit of longshoremen: granted, 

155. 

Western Union Telegraph Company 

Dispute (Communications Workers) (Cable Di- 
vision) : settlement, 334. 

White-Collar Workers 

CLC, organization, white-collar workers, 396. 
CLC Executive Council, policy statement, 606. 
CNTU, views, 1373. 



Willis, Horace B., Limited 

Dispute (Labourers): settlement, 973. 
Winnipeg and District Labour Council (CLC) 

Russell, R. B. "Bob", Executive Secretary, retire- 
ment, 1334. 
Winter Works See Municipal Winter Works 

Incentive Program 
Wolfe Stevedores Limited 

Certification application (Local 375, Longshore- 
men) : rejected, 331. 

Certification application (Local 375, Railway 
and Steamship Clerks, intervener) : rejected, 
331. 
Women in Industry See also Minimum Wages, 
Training 

Appointments and promotions in U.S. Govern- 
ment service to be made without regard to 
sex, 1272. 

CBC Conference: The Real World of Woman, 
1134. 

Canadian Federation of Business and Profes- 
sional Women's Clubs — biennial convention, 
911. 

Canadian legislation on women's work, com- 
parison with ILO standards, 526. 

Commission on Status of Women, established 
by President Kennedy, 3. 

CNTU, views, 1374. 

Equal pay for equal work, women in the Civil 
Service. SINGAPORE: 1272. 

ILO African Advisory Committee studies em- 
ployment conditions of African women, 1384. 

Job Training for the Mature Woman Entering 
or Re-entering the Labour Force, federal De- 
partment of Labour, 749. 

Preparation of girls and women for employ- 
ment, meeting, federal Department of Labour, 
394. 

Twenty-four university presidents endorse equal 
pay for women on faculty, 243. 

U.N. Commission on the Status of Women, 
829, 920. 

Women in the labour force, DBS survey, 1135. 

Women in the labour force in six countries of 
Europe, federal Department of Labour — 
Belgium, 421. 
Denmark, 152. 

Federal Republic of Germany. 329 
France, 45. 
Italy, 1025. 

The Netherlands, 635. 
Woodworkers of America, International 

CLC special committee to investigate dispute, 
Woodworkers and Carpenters, over New- 
foundland loggers, 122; proposed settlement, 
396; report, 608. 

Certification application (Upper Ottawa Im- 
provement Company): 950; granted, 1031. 

Legal decisions, 221, 344, 856. 
Work Injuries See Accidents, Industrial 
Work Rules See Railways 
Workers' College See Workers' Education 
Workers' Education 

Canadian Workers' College, 320. 



INDEX 



XLI 



Working Conditions See Labour Conditions 

Workmen's Compensation See also Accidents, 
Industrial; Government Employees Com- 
pensation Branch 

Alta. Workmen's Compensation Act: regulations, 
78, 351, 454, 730. 

Alta. Workmen's Compensation Board, factory 
inspection services, 1354. 

B.C. Workmen's Compensation Act: regulations, 
81. 

Man. Federation of Labour, resolutions, 1364. 

N.B. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ments, 1012, 1013, 1014, 1015. 

Nfld. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ment, 1014; regulation, 865. 

N.S. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ments, 1012, 1013, 1014. 

Ont. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ments, 224. 

P.E.I. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ments, 1012, 1013, 1014. 

Provincial laws, changes in 1962. CANADA: 
1012. 

Que. Workmen's Compensation Act: regula- 
tions, 352, 456. 

Sask. Workmen's Compensation Act: amend- 
ments, 1012, 1013, 1014. 



Supreme Court of Canada upholds finality of 
Workmen's Compensation Board decision re- 
fusing compensation to widow, 539. 

Workmen's Compensation in Canada, 1961 
edition, 282. 



Yohe, Dr. R. V., President, B. F. Goodrich Canada 
Limited 
Business Newspapers Association, address, 1110. 
Youth 

Presidential Committee on Youth Employment, 
establishment, 3, first report, 236. UNITED 
STATES: 
U.S. Fair Labor Standards Act: Hazardous 
Occupations Order No. 16, 456. 



Zenith Transport Limited 

Certification application (Local 605, Teamsters) : 
unit of drivers: 52; representation vote, 155; 
granted, 331. 



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JANUARY 31, 



H 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR 

Send remittance by cheque or post office money order, payable to the Receiver-General of 
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Annual Report of The Department of Labour (Covers fiscal year ending 
March 31). (English or French). Price 25 cents. 

REPRINTS FROM THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

10 cents a copy except where otherwise indicated. 
Orders of 20 or more, 5 cents; 100 or more, 4 cents. 

Industrial and Geographic Distribution of Union Membership in Canada, 

1960 (English or French). 
Two Broadcasts on Older Worker Problem (English). 
Seasonal Unemployment in Canada (English). 
Arbitration Board's Power to Award Damages for Breach of Agreement 

(English). 
Wage Rates and Selected Working Conditions in Eight Construction Trades 

(1959) (English or French). 
Human Rights in Canada (English or French). Price 25 cents. 

Canadian Labour Papers on Microfilm Available in Department of Labour 

Library (English). 

ECONOMICS AND RESEARCH BRANCH 

Labour Organizations in Canada (annual). Contains a brief commentary, 
the latest statistical data on union membership, and a directory of 
labour organizations with names of their principal officers, publications, 
and the geographic distribution of their local branches in Canada. 
(English or French). Price 35 cents. 

Strikes and Lockouts in Canada (annual). Furnishes a record of strikes 
and lockouts occurring in Canada during a year. Tables and related 
texts showing strikes and lockouts by years, by areas, by industries, 
including time lost, number of workers involved, duration, etc. (English 
or French). Price 35 cents. 

Wage Rates, Salaries and Hours of Labour. An annual report published in 
loose-leaf form and followed later by a paper-bound volume. Contains 
the results of an annual survey at October 1 of occupational wage rates 
and standard hours of work in most industries. Averages and pre- 
dominant ranges of wage rates for selected occupations are tabulated 
separately on a regional basis for some 90 industries including logging, 
mining, manufacturing, construction, transportation, trade and service 
groups. Weekly salaries for office occupations, and wage rates for 
labourers in manufacturing in 40 cities are also shown. Trends in 
wage rates are indicated in tables of index numbers by industry. 
(English and French). 

First year service including attractive binder with index tabs 
and paper bound volume, $7.50; service without indexed binder, 
$5.00; individual tables, 10 cents. 

Group Hospitalization and Medical Insurance Plans in Canadian Manu- 
facturing Industries (English or French). Price 25 cents. 

Labour Management Research Series 

1. Provisions for Income Security in Canadian Manufacturing Industries. 

Price 25 cents. 

2. Shiftwork and Shift Differentials in Canadian Manufacturing Industries. 

Price 25 cents. 
Professional Manpower Bulletins 

1. Trends in Professional Manpower Supplies and Requirements. (Out of 
print.) 

2. Immigrants in Scientific and Technical Professions in Canada. 

3. Canadians Studying in the United States for Degrees in Science, 
Engineering, Agriculture, Architecture and Veterinary Medicine, 
1955-56. 

4. Recent Changes in Engineering Manpower Requirements and Supplies 
in Canada. 

5. Employment Outlook for Professional Personnel in Scientific and 
Technical Fields, 1958-1960. (Superseded by Bulletin No. 8.) 

(Continued on page three of cover) 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

Official Journal of the Department- of Labour, Canada 

Hon. Michael Starr, Minister George V. Haythorne, Deputy Minister 



Published Monthly in 
English and French 



Editorial Staff 

Editor 

W. S. Drinkwater 

Assistant Editor 

R. M. Dyke 

Editor, French Edition 

Guy de Merlis 

Circulation Manager 

J. E. Abbey 



Cover Photograph 
National Film Board 



Vol. LXII, No. 1 CONTENTS January 31. 1962 

Notes of Current Interest 2 

Employment in Canada in 1961 5 

Migration of Professional Workers into and out of Canada 7 

Professional Manpower Advisory Committee 11 

Impact of Electronic Data Processing 15 

Latest Labour Statistics 16 

Manpower Situation, 4th Quarter 17 

Collective Bargaining in December 24 

Fifth Annual Convention, Ontario Federation of Labour 30 

Special Convention, Confederation of National Trade Unions . . 32 

4th Biennial Convention of the AFL-CIO 38 

Industrial Fatalities 41 

New Act in Force (Civilian Rehabilitation) 43 

Government Committee on Older Workers 44 

The Working Women of France 45 

50 Years Ago This Month 46 

International Labour Organization: 

New Director of Institute for Labour Studies 47 

150th Session, ILO Governing Body 48 

Teamwork in Industry 49 

Industrial Relations: 

Certification Proceedings 50 

Conciliation Proceedings 53 

Labour Law: 

Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 69 

Recent Regulations under Provincial Legislation 78 

Unemployment Insurance 

Monthly Report on Operation 83 

Decisions of the Umpire 84 

Labour Conditions in Federal Government Contracts 87 

Prices and the Cost of Living 91 

Publications Recently Received in Department's Library 93 

Labour Statistics 97 



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Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Department, Ottawa. 
52905-7—1 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 



Committee Will Review Method 
Of Measuring U.S. Unemployment 

United States President John F. Kennedy 
has appointed a committee of six profes- 
sional economists to analyse the procedure 
by which the number of jobless is tabulated, 
and to make recommendations for improve- 
ment of the method. This action followed 
extensive criticism of the Government's 
method of counting the unemployed. 

Federal Government leaders in the U.S. 
have been disturbed by the high level of 
unemployment that has obtained despite the 
current economic upsurge. 

Criticism of the present method of 
counting the unemployed has come from 
union leaders who, however, assert that the 
figures are too low rather than too high. 
The jobless count, they say, should be 
higher to include as unemployed those in- 
voluntarily working part-time; these per- 
sons are now listed as employed. 

On the opposite side have been critics 
who claim that students looking for work, 
and housewives seeking work to supplement 
the family income, should not be counted 
as unemployed. 

Committee members are: Prof. Robert 
Aaron Gordon of the University of Cali- 
fornia, chairman; Robert Dorfman of 
Harvard University, Albert E. Ross of 
Chicago, Frederick F. Stephan of prince- 
ton University, economist Etanley Rutten- 
berg of the AFL-CIO, and Martin R. Gains- 
brugh of the National Industrial Conference 
Board . 

A Canadian committee to consider 
changes in the monthly statistical report 
on employment and unemployment was set 
up in March 1960. The committee's recom- 
mendation for a national estimate of 
unemployment was adopted by the Govern- 
ment in October that year (L.G. 1960, 
p. 1109). 

Department Publishes Latest 
Wage Rates and Hours Report 

Wage Rates, Salaries and Hours of 
Labour, Report No. 43, prepared by the 
Economics and Research Branch of the 
Department of Labour, has just been issued. 
It brings together in one volume the results 
of the October 1960 survey of wage rates, 
salaries and hours of labour in Canadian 
industry that were issued between February 



and June 1961 in the form of loose-leaf 
tables for separate industries and communi- 
ties. 

As in previous years, tables are included 
for 85 separate industries, each providing 
information on wage rates for selected 
occupations particularly characteristic of 
the industry in question. Copies of the 400- 
page book (Catalogue No. L2-543) may be 
obtained from the Queen's Printer Ottawa, 
price $1 each. 

Citizens' Forum Exploring Impact 
Of Rapid Industrial Growth 

In a series of 13 television programs, the 
CBC Citizens' Forum is exploring the 
aspects of rapid industrial development 
and its impact on the daily lives of 
Canadians. 

Citizens' Forum, a joint project of the 
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and 
the Canadian Association for Adult Educa- 
tion, decided on this subject for study 
because Canada is to be host in May and 
June this year to The Duke of Edinburgh's 
Second Commonwealth Study Conference on 
the human consequences of industrialization. 

The series began January 14 with a 
program titled "In a Company Town," 
which studied the situation in a town where 
the requirements of industry have dictated 
where and how the inhabitants live. 

The January 28 program, titled "In a 
Recently Incorporated Oil Town," dealt 
with a situation where Texan executives 
and government planners have converged 
on a remote community. 

Next in the series will be "In a Group of 
Coal-Mining Towns," to be presented on 
February 4. It will portray conditions 
where hope still remains that this declining 
industry may survive. 

February 1 1 — In a Railway Town, depict- 
ing how the replacement of steam loco- 
motives by diesels has affected town life. 

February 25 — In a New Pulp and Paper 
Community, where modern methods and 
concepts are likely to change the pattern 
of a whole area. 

March 4 — In a Fishing Town, where local 
Indians must adjust to mechanization and 
large-scale marketing. 

March 11 — In a Small Town, where one 
foundry, in a family for three generations, 
provides a living for a large sector of the 
community. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



March 18 — In a Rural Area, where in- 
dustry has come to supplement agriculture. 

March 25 — In a Small Industrial Town, 
where traditions of family life have been 
broken up within a single generation. 

April 1 — In a Boom Town, a town which 
came into being, then dwindled away 
because of the pressures of fluctuations of 
world markets. 

April 8 — With the Emphasis on Women, 
dealing with the involvement of women in 
and their reactions to technological change. 

April 15 — With the Coming of Automa- 
tion, a study of the change for the worker 
in heavy industry. 

A summing up in a seminar will be 
presented on the April 22 program. 



Commission on Status of Women 
Established by U.S. President 

Employment problems of women will be 
studied by a Commission on the Status of 
Women established by United States 
President Kennedy by an executive order 
last month. Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt has 
been appointed its chairman; Mrs. Esther 
Peterson, Assistant Secretary of Labor and 
Director of the U.S. Women's Bureau, is 
vice-chairman. 

The Commission is composed of 26 men 
and women, supplemented by subcommit- 
tees. Its own small staff is to receive help 
from the Department of Labor and other 
government agencies and to seek co-opera- 
tion of a wide variety of individuals, in- 
stitutions and civic groups. 

The Commission will study the progress 
and make recommendations for action in the 
following areas: 

— Employment policies and practices of 
the federal Government. 

— Employment policies and practices, 
including those on wages, under federal con- 
tracts. 

— Effects of federal social insurance 
programs and tax laws on the net earnings 
and other income of women. 

— Appraisal of federal and state labour 
laws dealing with such matters as hours, 
night work and wages, to determine whether 
they are accomplishing the purposes for 
which they were established and whether 
they need to be adapted to changing 
technological, economic and social develop- 
ments. 

— Differences in legal treatment of men 
and women in regard to political and civil 
rights, property rights, and family relations. 

— New and expanded services that may 
be required for women as wives, mothers 
and workers, including education, counsell- 



ing, training, home services, and arrange- 
ments for care of children during the work- 
ing day. 

The Commission is expected to recom- 
mend means for giving appropriate recogni- 
tion to women's civic and political accomp- 
lishments and rights, for strengthening home 
life and for protecting mothers who do not 
wish outside employment as well as those 
who seek it because of need or individual 
choice. It is also to recommend methods for 
overcoming discrimination against women in 
employment and civil, political and property 
rights, and to suggest how their skills should 
be developed and used to national advantage 
in domestic and international affairs. 

The Commission's report is to be com- 
pleted by October 1, 1963. 

A week after President Kennedy's execu- 
tive order, the Chairman of the U.S. Civil 
Service Commission instructed all govern- 
ment agencies to review their personnel 
policies and operations to make sure there 
is no discrimination against women. The 
agencies were given until March 1 to report 
on their review. 

The agencies were told to include a state- 
ment of specific reasons when they requested 
a civil service list of persons eligible for 
employment on the basis of "men only" 
or "women only". 



U.S. President Forms Committee 
To Help Find Jobs for Youth 

United States President John F. Kennedy 
has named a 2 3 -member committee in an 
effort to find work for about one million 
unemployed youths. The committee includes 
federal, state, and local officials and citizens. 

Chairman of the committee is U.S. 
Secretary of Labor Arthur J. Goldberg, 
Others of cabinet rank in the committee are 
Secretary of Commerce Luther H. Hodges; 
Secretary of Health, Education and Wel- 
fare Abraham A. Ribicoff; Administrator 
of the Housing and Home Finance Agency 
Robert C. Weaver, and Attorney-General 
Robert F. Kennedy. 

Labour leaders on the committee include 
President George Meany of the AFL-CIO; 
Mrs. Mildred Jeffreys, Community Rela- 
tions Director of the United Auto Workers; 
Joseph A. Beirne, President, Communica- 
tions Workers of America; and Cornelius 
J. Haggerty, President, Building and Con- 
struction Trades Department, AFL-CIO. 

Donald J. Hardenbrook, National Vice- 
President, National Association of Manu- 
facturers, and Richard Wagner, President, 
U.S. Chamber of Commerce, are also 
members. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 

52905-7— 1£ 



Provincial Federation of Labour 
Presents Brief to B.C. Govt. 

Vigorous efforts to reduce unemployment 
were urged by the British Columbia Federa- 
tion of Labour in a brief presented to the 
provincial Cabinet last month. The Federa- 
tion emphasized particularly the difficulties 
that young people between the ages of 17 
and 24 years have in obtaining employment. 

It suggested that a legislative committee 
be formed to deal with the problems of 
youths who are trying to find work on 
leaving school. 

The Federation's delegation, which was 
led by President Robert Smeal and Secre- 
tary Pat O'Neal, saw little promise of 
increased employment during 1962. 

The brief asked for financial help for 
those who are taking formal or vocational 
training while unemployed. It urged 
participation by the provincial Govern- 
ment in the winter works program to the 
extent of bearing 50 per cent of the cost of 
aid to municipalities, and a federal and 
provincial government program to provide 
more money for capital projects for schools, 
universities, hospitals, housing, roads and 
parks. 

Raising of the basic minimum wage from 
the present "totally inadequate" 60 cents 
and hour to $1.25 an hour, and measures 
to stop discrimination against job-seekers of 
more than 40 years of age in some in- 
dustries, were also requested. 

Other measures proposed were: 

Restoration by the Government of 
medical care for single, unemployed men 
on social assistance. 

— Free education at all levels, the cost to 
be borne by the general revenue fund. 

— Collective bargaining rights for 
employees of the Government and of crown 
companies, by amendment of the Labour 
Relations Act and the Power Act by which 
the British Columbia Power Commission 
was set up. 

— A bonding law to protect workers 
against "fly-by-night" contractors who go 
bankrupt and are unable to pay wages due 
their employees. 

— An investigation into "deplorable condi- 
tions" in Vancouver's garment industry. 

— Legislation to forbid firms from hiring 
professional strikebreakers, a practice that 
the Federation said was gaining popularity 
in British Columbia. 

— Amendment of the Municipal Act to 
allow paid officers or employees of a muni- 
cipality to be candidates for public office. 

The Federation asked for a full investiga- 
tion into the expropriation by the Govern- 
ment of the British Columbia Electric Co. 



It favoured the expropriation, but ques- 
tioned the manner in which it had been 
accomplished. It requested an appraisal of 
the Company's assets, with publication of 
all accounting details, and the right to sub- 
mit the terms of the expropriation to 
arbitration. 

The Federation presented a lengthy 
statement on real estate matters, in which it 
complained that mortgagees who charge 
high interest rates, and also require large 
bonus payments and short-term conditions 
of payment, are guilty of a "form of vil- 
lainy." 

Enactment was requested of "a bill 
requiring complete disclosure by all money- 
lenders of exact nominal, effective and true 
annual interest rates." 

The brief reiterated the Federation's 
complaints against Bills 42 and 43, and con- 
tended that the result of these measures had 
been that employers have become "more 
arrogant and unapproachable," and that the 
trade union movement had been "crippled" 
and many workers deprived of an effective 
voice in the settlement of their problems. 



Canada Offers 125 Scholarships 
Under Commonwealth Plan 

Nominations for scholarships and fellow- 
ships under the Commonwealth Scholarship 
and Fellowship Plan were by March 31, 
1961 being invited by 13 Commonwealth 
countries at a total rate of 525 awards a 
year, according to the Plan's first annual 
report. The number of scholarships and 
fellowships already instituted exceeds the 
1,000 contemplated when the plan was set 
up. Of the total of 525, Canada was offer- 
ing 125. 

Review of Tritschler Report 
(Brandon Strike) in Next Issue 

The report of Mr. Justice G. E. Tritschler 
into the strike at the plant of Brandon 
Packers Ltd. in Brandon was released in 
November. A review of this report will be 
published in the February issue of the 
Labour Gazette. 

The report of the one-man commission 
contains the findings of a full inquiry into 
the course of negotiations between Local 
255 of the United Packinghouse Workers 
and Brandon Packers Ltd., and the actions 
taken by both parties in connection with 
the strike, which began February 29 and 
continued until August 29, 1960. 

The commission presented its report in 
February 1961 but publication was withheld 
lest its contents prove prejudicial to the 
trial of the company's two owners on 
charges of conspiracy, theft and fraud. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



Employment in Canada in 1961 



Expenditures on housing and durable goods, whose decline in 1960 held back the 
year's gain in output to 3 per cent, revived in 1961, setting stage tor a more 
rapid and more broadly based economic expansion. Exports continued to rise 



Expenditures on housing and durable 
goods, which when they declined in 1960 
held back the year's advance in total output 
to 3 per cent, showed renewed strength in 
1961, setting the stage for a more rapid and 
more broadly based expansion of economic 
activity in Canada. 

In 1960, there was a good but not out- 
standing advance, as the increases in con- 
sumer spending on services and non-durable 
goods, in government expenditures and in 
exports were tempered by the declines in 
expenditures on housing and durable goods 
(L.G., Feb. 1961, p. 114). 

In 1961, in addition to the revival in 
housing and in demand for durable goods, 
exports continued to rise, together with 
demands emanating from public expendi- 
tures and from consumer expenditures on 
services and non-durable goods. Expansion 
of business plant and equipment, although it 
did not place additional demands upon the 
productive resources of the country, showed 
signs of firming as the year progressed. 

Reflecting these broader developments, the 
pace of over-all activity quickened notice- 
ably during the course of the year. Labour 
income, employment and output rose to 
record levels and unemployment showed an 
encouraging decline. 

In July, average earnings were 2.6 per 
cent higher than one year earlier, and about 
2 per cent higher when allowance is made 
for price increases of consumer goods and 
services. When all the figures are in, they 
will probably show that employment in 1961 
averaged about 1.5 per cent higher than the 
year before. There has been little change in 
the length of the work week in manufac- 
turing; the standard 40-hour week has been 
fairly general since the beginning of 1960. 
Industrial production has shown a steady 
upward trend since the beginning of 1961 
after showing declines for three successive 
quarters. The main advance has been in 
durable goods, which, as indicated earlier, 
was partly responsible for the slowdown in 
1960. 

The drop in unemployment during 1961 
has been particularly encouraging. In the 
previous year, unemployment increased 
despite an employment advance of almost 
2 per cent. In the summer and fall of 1961, 
however, unemployment declined very 
sharply and by November was estimated to 



be 80,000 lower than a year earlier, though 
still somewhat higher than in November 
1959. The coming of winter brings with it 
a seasonal slackening in employment and 
an increase in unemployment but because 
of the strength of recent advances in eco- 
nomic activity and the general atmosphere 
of confidence prevailing in industry, the 
rise in unemployment this winter is expected 
to be less than seasonal. 

The Municipal Winter Works Incentive 
Program is expected to play an increasingly 
important role in stimulating employment at 
the local level this winter. This program 
was instituted by the federal Government 
in the fall of 1958 and has since grown 
rapidly. The estimated number employed 
under it numbered only 42,000 in the first 
winter but reached 121,000 in the winter of 
1960-61. Projects submitted by municipali- 
ties so far this year indicate that the number 
employed under the expanded 1961-1962 
program will be substantially higher this 
winter. 

An important feature of 1961 was the 
renewed strength of demand in those areas 
of employment, notably durable goods 
manufacturing, where men make up a large 
part of the labour force. As a result, men 
accounted for a substantially larger propor- 
tion of the increase in employment than 
women. In November 1961, employment 
was 126,000 higher than a year earlier, and 
men accounted for more than half of the 
increase. This contrasts sharply with the 
pattern of the previous year, when virtually 
all of the increased number of employed 
were women and most of the increase was 
in the service-producing industries. 

Much of the support for the rise in em- 
ployment has come from renewed strength- 
ening in manufacturing. In November, total 
manufacturing employment showed a year- 
to-year advance of 96,000. The most notice- 
able improvement was in durable goods. 
Sizeable gains were recorded in aircraft, 
shipbuilding, iron and steel products, motor 
vehicles and electrical apparatus. Most of 
the soft goods industries operated at 
moderately higher levels than the year 
before. 

Employment in non-manufacturing indus- 
tries declined slightly, mainly reflecting pro- 
duction cutbacks in mining and forestry. The 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



service-producing industries showed con- 
tinuing strength, although they were less 
expansive than in the previous two years. 

Activity in the construction industry was 
fairly well maintained. More houses were 
being built than in the previous year and 
there were increasing demands for institu- 
tional and government facilities. On the 
other hand, outlays for new plant and 
equipment showed a moderate decline, al- 
though in the final months of the year there 
were indications of slight upward revisions 
in investment plans. At mid-year a signif- 
icant number of construction projects were 
behind schedule, partly because of unfavour- 
able weather in the early spring. During the 
late fall, moreover, a strike held up work 
in the Montreal area. In most parts of the 
country, however, mild weather late in the 
year enabled contractors to make up for 
time lost earlier in the year. 

The Labour Supply 

The labour force increased at a slower 
rate during 1961 than in the previous year. 
For the first 11 months, the increase over 
the corresponding period in 1960 averaged 
only 120,000, representing a gain of 1.9 
per cent. This compares with a rate of 2.8 
per cent in 1960 and a long-term average of 
2.2 per cent. 

The slowdown in the growth of the male 
labour force was quite striking. Averaging 
only 34,000 higher than in 1960, the in- 
crease was considerably smaller than in any 
recent year. The female labour force showed 
a continuing high growth rate although the 
increase was less spectacular than in 1960. 
Expansion of jobs in the service-producing 
industries, which employ a relatively high 
proportion of women, has moderated some- 
what from the unusually high rate in the 
previous year. As a result, somewhat fewer 
women have been attracted into the labour 
force. 

Increased school attendance among males 
under the age of 20 had a significant in- 
fluence on the growth rate of the male 
labour force during the past year. Other con- 
tributing factors were earlier retirements of 
older men and lower immigration. The 
total inflow of immigrants in the first nine 
months dropped to the lowest level in 10 
years. 

The increasing proportion of young people 
taking formal and informal training is 
encouraging. As job opportunities are 
limited for people lacking in skills or educa- 
tion, there is little doubt that this trend will 
continue. Under the new federal-provincial 
agreement (L.G., Nov. 1961, p. 1096), the 
technical and vocational training program 



will be greatly increased. During the year 
ending March 1, 1962, it is estimated that 
$85,000,000 will be spent on new school 
buildings and equipment. This greatly ex- 
panded building program, 75 per cent of 
which will be financed by the federal 
Government, will provide facilities for 
vocational courses at the high school level 
and the trade and technical levels in all 
areas of industrial, service and commercial 
activity. In this new agreement, emphasis 
is placed on upgrading and retraining those 
now employed, as well as on pre-employ- 
ment training for those entering the labour 
force. The number of unemployed persons 
receiving training has increased each year 
and a substantial increase is expected dur- 
ing the coming winter. 

The decline in unemployment was quite 
noticeable in the fall months of 1961. In the 
third quarter of the winter, the number 
unemployed averaged 328,000, or 4.9 per 
cent of the labour force. A year earlier it 
was 336,000, or 5.1 per cent of the labour 
force. The decrease over the year was main- 
ly among unemployed men, particularly in 
the 20 to 24 age group. 

Some 269,000 of those unemployed in 
the third quarter of 1961 were men and of 
these 93,000 were under 25 years, 101,000 
were 25 to 44 years and 75,000 were over 
45 years. Some 137,000, or slightly more 
than half, were married. 

The number of unemployed women was 
59,000 in the third quarter of 1961. Of 
these, 35,000 (more than 60 per cent) were 
under 25 years of age. Almost the same 
number were single. 

The decline in unemployment during the 
year can be attributed largely to the 
employment recovery in durable goods 
manufacturing. Rehiring in these industries 
was responsible for a sharp drop in the 
number of unemployed men. The number 
of unemployed women was virtually 
unchanged over the year; in fact, unemploy- 
ment among women has not changed appre- 
ciably for several years even though the 
proportion of women participating in the 
labour force has been rising steadily. This 
development reflects in part the generally 
strong demand for women workers, partic- 
ularly in service industries. 

Wages and Working Conditions 

The average of weekly wages and salaries 
for non-farm employees in Canada was 
$78.30 in July 1961. This represents an 
increase of $2.02, or 2.6 per cent,, over 
July 1960. This was a smaller rate of in- 
crease in wages and salaries than in the 
previous year, but as consumer prices rose 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



by only one half of 1 per cent in the period, 
the gain in real average earnings was more 
than 2 per cent. 

The rise in weekly wages and salaries 
between July 1960 and July 1961 was 
shared by all major industrial groups in 
the economy. Above-average wage and 
salary gains were achieved in the finance 
and transportation sectors and more than 
5-per-cent increase was recorded in the 
service industries. Wages and salaries in 
manufacturing and in trade increased by an 
amount equivalent to the average increase 
for all industries, whereas slightly less 
than average gains were achieved in the 
mining, construction and public utilities sec- 
tors of industry. 

A survey of pension plans in effect in 
Canadian manufacturing industries on 
May 1, 1960 indicates that two out of three 
plant workers and about eight out of ten 
office workers were employed in establish- 
ments that provide a pension plan. In 
establishments that reported pension plans, 
more than two thirds of the plant workers 
and three quarters of the office workers 
were in establishments that provide to em- 
ployees partial or full vested rights in the 
pension plan. Almost one half of both plant 
and office workers in manufacturing were 
in establishments with pension plans that 
provide for the integration of pension bene- 
fits with payments under the Old Age Secur- 
ity Act. 

At the beginning of 1961 there were 
1,446,942 union members in Canada, of 



whom 1,070,837 were members of the 
Canadian Labour Congress. Union member- 
ship was about one third of the non-farm 
labour force. 

In the first six months of last year, 116 
major collective agreements, each affecting 
500 or more workers, were signed; the 
agreements covered more than 280,000 
workers in total and provided wage increases 
for 240,000. All but three of these agree- 
ments were signed without recourse to strike 
action. More than half of them covered 
workers in manufacturing and affected 
approximately 75,000 workers in this indus- 
try sector. Other major groups of employees 
for whom new contracts were negotiated 
were 110,000 non-operating railway work- 
ers, 42,000 employees in logging, and 28,000 
hospital and municipal workers. Most of 
the major agreements signed during the first 
half of the year were for periods ranging 
between one and two years. 

Wage increases of less than 10 cents an 
hour on base rates were the most common 
in one-year contracts and increases ranging 
between 5 and 15 cents an hour over the 
life of the agreement were most frequent in 
the two-year contracts. In the majority of 
the three-year contracts signed during this 
period, increases in base rates ranged from 
10 to 20 cents an hour over the life of the 
agreement. 

— Prepared by Labour Market Analysis 
Section in collaboration with Employment 
and Labour Market Division, Economics and 
Research Branch, Department of Labour. 



Migration of Professional Workers 

into and out of Canada, 1946-1960 

Nearly 92,000 professional workers immigrated to Canada between 1946-1960 but 
in 1950-60 period, 42,000 professional and technical workers emigrated to U.S. 



Nearly 92,000 professional persons im- 
migrated to Canada between 1946 and 1960; 
more than 54 per cent came during the five- 
year period 1953-57. Of this number, more 
than 16,000, or almost 18 per cent, were 
engineers, who constituted the largest single 
group of immigrants among the professional 
classes. 

During the period 1950-60, however, 
Canada lost 42,014 professional and tech- 
nical workers through emigration to the 
United States. Nearly 50 per cent of them 
were either engineers (18.7 per cent) or 
nurses (30.5 per cent). Emigration was 
heaviest in the years 1956, 1957, 1959 and 
1960. 



These statistics are given in a new bulle- 
tin just issued by the Department of Labour. 
The bulletin, The Migration of Professional 
Workers Into and Out of Canada 1946-1960, 
is No. 11 in the Professional Manpower 
Series prepared by the Economics and Re- 
search Branch. 

The principal purpose of the report is 
"to assess the extent of the movement of 
professional manpower both into and out of 
the country, to point out the main character- 
istics of the manpower taking part in such 
migrations and to comment on some of the 
factors influencing the extent and nature 
of the movements," the book's foreword 
says. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



Although in recent years the total number 
of immigrants has declined, the influx of 
professional workers has been maintained 
at the high level of 7,000 reached in 1952, 
with the result that the ratio of professional 
to total immigration reached 7.1 per cent 
in 1960. 

The report points out that the immigra- 
tion figures given have the weakness, among 
others, that they represent the occupations 
that the immigrants, before they left for 
Canada, said they intended to follow, and 
it cannot be assumed that they are the 
occupations actually followed by the immi- 
grants after they arrived in this country. 

The main weakness in the figures on 
emigration is that adequate information is 
available only on the exodus to the United 
States, the report says. As far as can be 
ascertained, however, "the combined emi- 
gration from Canada to the United States 
and to the United Kingdom, within recent 
years, has made up from 70 to 80 per cent 
of the total emigration from Canada, with 
the flow to the United States constituting 
more than 60 per cent of the total outward 
movement." 

Factors Determining Immigration to Canada 

During the period 1946-50, immigration 
of professionals, as of non-professionals, 
was held back by shortage of shipping; 
requirements for sponsoring; restrictions on 
the admission of former enemy aliens; 
special concessions in favour of displaced 
persons, very few of whom were in pro- 
fessional occupations; the unusually low 
proportion of British immigrants, among 
whom there had always been a large num- 
ber of professionals; and the priority given 
by Canadian immigration policy to im- 
migrants destined for work in agriculture 
and other primary industries. 

In the period 1951-57, the main factor 
responsible for the sharp rise in the 
immigration of professionals was the 
liberalization of Canadian immigration 
policy in mid- 1950. 

This consisted largely of allowing a con- 
siderable volume of unsponsored immigra- 
tion, varying with economic conditions in 
Canada. In fact, this meant an occupational 
selection of unsponsored immigrants in 
the light of domestic employment condi- 
tions. Controls on the admission of enemy 
aliens were likewise relaxed, and this had 
the result of increasing the immigration of 
Germans in various professional occupa- 
tions from 1951 onwards. 

The year 1957 was a turning point, and 
in 1958, 1959 and 1960 the flow dropped to 
less than half what it had been in 1957. 



"The reasons for the decline in the im- 
migration of professionals in these years 
have been mostly economic and have 
reflected conditions both at home and 
abroad," the report states. 

Foremost among the reasons for the 
decline were the diminished demand for 
certain professional classes consequent 
upon the slackening of industrial activity 
in Canada, and, on the supply side, 
prosperous conditions in continental 
Europe and in the United Kingdom, which 
made it more difficult to attract professionals 
from these countries. 

Types of Professional Immigrants 

Next to engineers, graduate nurses 
formed the largest group of professional 
immigrants during the 1946-60 period, with 
13,713, or 14.9 per cent of the total. 
Teachers and professors came next with 
11,766, or 12.8 per cent; then draughtsmen 
and designers wih 9,520, or 10.4 per cent. 

Among engineers, the most numerous 
types were civil engineers with 4,930, 
electrical engineers with 4,362, and 
mechanical engineers with 3,963. The num- 
bers of other professional groups are given 
in the bulletin. The proportion of profes- 
sional immigrants to total immigrants was 
about 2 per cent during the period 1946 to 
1951, except in 1947, when it reached 3 
per cent. In 1952, it rose to 4.3 per cent. 
Since 1953 it has exceeded 5 per cent, 
reaching its highest point, 7.1 per cent, 
in 1960. 

As a proportion of the total in the pro- 
fession in the Canadian labour force in 
1951, immigrant achitects came first at 
99.4 per cent. Draughtsmen and designers, 
electrical engineers and mechanical 
engineers came next, all of these profes- 
sions exceeding 60 per cent. Numerically, 
teachers and professors stood almost the 
highest; but proportionately to the numbers 
of the profession in the labour force, they 
formed only 10.6 per cent. 

Ethnic Origins of Immigrant Professionals 

During the 1946-60 period, 53.1 per cent 
of the immigrant professionals were of 
British origin, 15.5 per cent from the 
United States, 5.2 per cent of German 
ethnic origin, and 3.9 per cent of Dutch 
origin. The ethnic origin of the remaining 
professional immigrants did not attain 3 per 
cent in any instance. 

In the period 1953-1960, immigrant pro- 
fessionals of British origin made up 50 per 
cent or more of the immigrants in most 
professional fields. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



Province of Destination of Immigrants 

A little more than 70 per cent of the 
immigrant professionals during the 1946- 
1960 period gave Ontario or Quebec as 
their destination — 46.7 per cent were going 
to Ontario and 23.5 per cent to Quebec. 
A little more than 11 per cent intended to 
go to British Columbia, 7.3 per cent to 
Alberta, and 3.4 and 3.2 per cent to 
Manitoba and Saskatchewan respectively. 
Only a small proportion gave as their 
destination the Maritime Provinces, the 
Yukon or the Northwest Territories. 

Women among Immigrant Professionals 

For professional occupations as a whole, 
the proportion of women professionals 
ranged from 26.5 in 1957 to 38.6 per cent 
in 1960. "The year 1957 actually recorded 
the highest number of women professionals 
admitted to Canada in the 12 years from 
which the data are available," the bulletin 
states. 

Women constituted almost 100 per cent of 
the immigrant nurses, and 50 per cent or 
more of the teachers and professors admitted 
to Canada in all years. "The proportion of 
women among laboratory technicians and 
assistants ranged from 28.7 in 1953 to 
41.3 per cent in 1958; and, among physicians 
and surgeons, from 10.6 in 1954 to 14 per 
cent in 1957. In 1953 and 1954, women 
dentists contributed over 18 per cent of 
the total of immigrant dentists for those 
two years, although the numbers involved 
were fairly small." 

The study showed that "for each of the 
years . . . from 1947 to 1960, women pro- 
fessionals constituted a higher percentage 
of the total female immigrants destined to 
the Canadian labour force than did the 
male professionals admitted to Canada dur- 
ing the same years. This, in fact, corresponds 
with the situation for the Canadian labour 
force as a whole . . ." 

Immigrants as Proportion of Professionals Hired 

During the two-year period 1956-57, of 
the total number of 7,714 engineers, scient- 
ists, and architects hired by the 2,500 
employers who took part in a survey con- 
ducted by the Department of Labour, 19.7 
per cent were recent immigrants. Another 
survey covering the year 1959 showed that 
recent immigrants as a proportion of the 
total had declined to 15.6 per cent. The 
findings of the surveys are cited by the 
bulletin. 

Emigration of Professionals— Causes 

Reasons given in the report for the de- 
parture of professionals to the United States 
include: higher salaries in that country than 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

52905-7—2 



• JANUARY 1962 



in Canada, greater variety of opportunities, 
close proximity to Canada, large number of 
students drawn to the United States to study 
and induced to remain there to work after 
studies are completed, and the rigours of 
the Canadian climate. 

Referring to the loss to Canada of some 
of those who go to the United States to 
study, the bulletin points out that this is 
partly offset by the fact that, as regards the 
many who return to Canada, there is a 
return flow of professional skill that is 
acquired without cost to the Canadian tax- 
payer, who pays for the subsidizing of Cana- 
dian universities. 

Of the types of professionals who emi- 
grated to the United States during the 
1950-60 period, nurses were the most con- 
spicuous; they made up 30.5 per cent 
of the total of professional emigrants. 
Engineers constituted 18.7 per cent. Other 
groups were accountants and auditors (5.4 
per cent), draughtsmen (5.2 per cent), 
teachers (9.4 per cent), scientists (4.4 per 
cent), physicians and surgeons (4.8 per 
cent), and technicians (7.4 per cent). 

Net Immigration 

During the 1950-60 period, the only year 
in which emigration of professionals ex- 
ceeded immigration was 1950. The year of 
highest net immigration (immigration minus 
emigration) was 1957, when it reached 
10,432. This was also the year in which 
both immigration and emigration reached 
their highest levels. 

Nurses were the only group in which emi- 
gration exceeded immigration for the period 
as a whole, the number who entered Canada 
being 12,616, and the number who left the 
country for the United States being 12,834. 

In net immigration three groups stood out 
far above the rest, together constituting 47 
per cent of the total net immigration of 
porfessionals for the period. These were: 
engineers, 6,984; draughtsmen and designers, 
6,510; and teachers and professors, 6,359. 

For the whole 11 -year period, emigration 
amounted to 49.5 per cent of total immigra- 
tion. Except for 1950, when there was a 
net loss, the ratio of emigrants to immi- 
grants was highest in 1959, when it 
amounted to 73.5 per cent. In 1960 it was 
only slightly lower at 72.6 per cent. The 
ratio was lowest in the years 1953, 1954 and 
1957, when it was 32.8, 34.6 and 35.0 per 
cent respectively. 

In every one of the years 1946 to 1960 
emigration of Canadian professionals to 
the United States was partly balanced by 
immigration of professionals from that 
country to Canada. In 1946, for example, 
immigration was 500, and emigration, 2,127; 



9 



in 1952, the figures were 1,381 and 3,172 
respectively; in 1957, they were 1,154 and 
5,608, and in 1960, they were 1,628 and 
5,400. 

One important way in which professionals 
come into Canada from the United States, 
and to a lesser extent from the United 
Kingdom, although the numbers involved 
cannot be measured, is the considerable 
inflow of immigrants who come to Canada 
to manage and administer Canadian sub- 
sidiaries of American companies. 

From 1953 to 1960, for example, 5,013 
persons from the United States indicated 
"manager" as their intended occupation, 
compared with 3,412 who immigrated from 
the United Kingdom during the same period. 
A good proportion of those classed as 
managers are believed to have had profes- 
sional training. 

Immigration vs. Graduations as Source ot Supply 

In many fields for several years, total 
immigration contributed larger numbers of 
professionals than did the corresponding 
graduations during the same years. "In fact, 
in 1957, the immigration of professionals 
in total exceeded the total number of uni- 
versity graduations in professional fields in 
Canada," the bulletin states. 

"On the other hand, during the period 
under review, total immigration made the 
smallest contribution in comparison with 
graduations in terms of manpower in the 
year 1950, when total immigration com- 
prised less than one tenth of the total num- 
ber of graduations for that year." 

Even net immigration in a few instances 
supplied more, or nearly as many profes- 
sionals as the numbers graduated from 
Canadian universities. This was the case 
with chemistry for all years, with architec- 
ture in four years, and with engineering in 
two years. 



In conclusion the bulletin says: "There is 
no doubt that the immigration of profes- 
sionals within the last decade and a half 
has made a valuable contribution to the 
Canadian economy as a whole and to cer- 
tain professions in particular. Many of these 
immigrants have come to this country 
already fully trained and frequently with 
considerable work experience behind them. 
In many instances, they have also brought 
along new ideas as well as fresh approaches 
to the solution of our problems. 

"Immigration also possesses a great ad- 
vantage over other sources of manpower 
supply inasmuch as the flow can be adjusted 
to changes in the labour market through 
government policy . . ." 

Regarding the outlook, the report says 
that, notwithstanding the greater difficulty 
in obtaining immigrants of this type than in 
earlier years, it is expected that the flow of 
immigrant professionals will remain at 
about the current level within the foresee- 
able future. But, since emigration of pro- 
fessionals to the United States is expected 
to continue its slightly upward trend, the 
result will be that net immigration of pro- 
fessional workers will probably decline as 
a proportion of total new supplies and show 
a net loss in certain professional fields. This 
situation has already developed in the case 
of engineers, draughtsmen and nurses, 
which registered net losses in 1959 and 
again in 1960. 

"In the final analysis," the report con- 
tinues, "this means that relatively more 
professional workers will have to be trained 
in Canada to meet the expected require- 
ments for this type of worker. Fortunately, 
because of the rising college age population 
and other reasons, it is expected that Cana- 
dian university enrolments and graduations 
will increase markedly in the 1960's and, 
in fact, by 1970 be more than double that 
of 1960." 



In the United States, the President's com- 
mittee on equal employment opportunity 
received 443 complaints of discrimination in 
companies doing government contract work, 
during its first seven months of operation. 
Of these, 121 were disposed of — 71 adjusted, 
14 withdrawn, 24 dismissed for "no cause" 



and 12 dismissed for "no jurisdiction." The 
remaining cases are being investigated. 

In government employment, 593 com- 
plaints were received, of which 70 were 
handled: 17 were adjusted by corrective 
action, 29 concluded with no finding of 
discrimination, 12 withdrawn, 9 dismissed, 
and 3 dropped for failure to appear. 



10 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



Professional Manpower Advisory Committee 

At its seventh meeting, Committee recommends establishment ot subcommittee to 
review available statistical information on professional manpower, suggest how 
to fill gaps in the information, reduce overlapping in gathering information 



The establishment of a subcommittee to 
review the statistical information available 
regarding professional manpower, to suggest 
how gaps in the information might be filled, 
and to reduce overlapping of efforts in the 
gathering of information was recommended 
by the Advisory Committee on Professional 
Manpower at its seventh meeting, held on 
December 4. 

Another suggestion made by the Com- 
mittee was that a handbook or compendium 
of statistical information on professional 
manpower should be published. The dele- 
gates thought that those who wanted such 
information were frequently at a loss to 
know where to find it, even though it had 
been published, and that a publication of 
the kind suggested would be useful in draw- 
ing together the information available. 

The meeting, which was attended by 
representatives of professional associations, 
industry, education, and federal Government 
departments and crown companies, was 
opened by Dr. W. R. Dymond, Assistant 
Deputy Minister of Labour and former 
Director of the Economics and Research 
Branch of the Department. 

After some introductory remarks about 
changes that had occurred in the profes- 
sional manpower situation since the Com- 
mittee was founded in 1955, Dr. Dymond 
turned over the chairmanship to the meet- 
ing to J. P. Francis, newly-appointed Direc- 
tor of the Branch. 

Mr. Francis gave a brief report on the 
action that had been taken concerning sug- 
gestions made by the Committee at the 
previous meeting. One of the suggestions 
had been that preliminary reports on the 
cycle survey of one third of the persons in 
the Register of Scientific and Technical Per- 
sonnel, kept by the Economics and Research 
Branch, should be sent to all those whose 
names were in the Register, instead of only 
to the one third who were covered by the 
survey each year. Mr. Francis said that this 
suggestion had been followed this year. 

A second suggestion had been that the 
Register should be extended to include the 
social sciences. This had been carefully con- 
sidered, the chairman said, but so far the 
resources of the Branch had not been 
enough to cover the extra work. In reply to 
questions, he said that lack of resources was 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

52905-7— 2i 



• JANUARY 7962 



not the only obstacle. Another difficulty was 
that problems were not as clearly defined in 
this field as in others. 

Regarding the shortage of medical doc- 
tors, Mr. Francis remarked that this question 
was being studied by the Royal Commission 
on health. He also pointed out that the 
Department of Labour was precluded from 
dealing with the medical profession because 
it came under the purview of the Depart- 
ment of Health and Welfare. 

A third suggestion made at the previous 
meeting had been that more survey work 
should be done regarding technicians. Mr. 
Francis said that a National Advisory Com- 
mittee on Technical Education (L.G., June 
1961, p. 546) had held a meeting during 
the summer under arrangements made by 
the Vocational Training Branch, and that 
work was going ahead as a result. The 
Economics and Research Branch was also 
preparing an occupational monograph on 
technicians. 

Regarding a fourth suggestion that there 
should be a broader circulation of the mate- 
rial issued by the Branch regarding research 
into professional manpower, the chairman 
said that nothing definite had been done yet, 
but that there was a growing interest in the 
Branch's material and that circulation had 
been growing as a result. 

The chairman welcomed the representa- 
tives of two new groups on the Committee, 
the Canadian Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion and the Pay Research Bureau of the 
Civil Service Commission. 

Dr. Paul H. Casselman 

Changes made in the June 1961 census 
should greatly add to our knowledge of 
technical and professional manpower, said 
Dr. Paul H. Casselman in a paper on 
"Sources of Information on Professional 
Manpower and Plans for the Future," in 
which he outlined some of the statistical 
problems involved in obtaining this kind of 
information. 

"For the first time, information will be 
available on the major science occupations 
and, also of great significance, more details 
will be obtained on the educational back- 
ground of the Canadian population," he 
continued. "In the 1951 and earlier censuses, 
high school and university graduates could 
not be separated. The data on university and 
college graduates, which will be obtained as 



11 



a result of the June 1961 census, will, it is 
hoped, allow us to make the best global 
assessment survey ever made of specialized 
manpower resources in Canada. 

"By relating level of education to earn- 
ings, we will be able to throw some light on 
the question of investment in human capital 
and on the returns on this investment, and 
on the relation between education and eco- 
nomic growth." 

The 1961 census data, when available, 
Dr. Casselman said, should also throw more 
light on the part played by immigration in 
adding to the supply of the various kinds 
of professional manpower in Canada during 
the period 1951-61. 

"The establishment of the Economic and 
Social Research Division in the Department 
of Citizenship and Immigration has already 
added to our knowledge in the area as a 
result of a survey, and release of a subse- 
quent report, dealing with the adjustment 
process of some 7,000 immigrants to 
Canada. 

"Lastly, proposed changes in the [statistics 
on] intended professional occupations of 
immigrants, to be made starting in 1962, 
will provide us with information on the 
science, technician and certain other occupa- 
tions which, so far, has escaped us," the 
speaker said. 

A. M. Sargent 

About 85 per cent of the Canadians who 
graduated from Canadian universities with 
a Ph.D. degree in science or engineering in 
1960-61 and who were immediately entering 
employment signified that they intended to 
work in Canada. This was learned in a 
survey of the future plans of Canadian 
graduate students conducted by the National 
Research Council. 

The processing and analysis of the data 
obtained by the survey were undertaken by 
the Economics and Research Branch of the 
Department fo Labour, and a report on the 
survey was given to the Committee by A. M. 
Sargent of that Branch. 

The number of new Ph.D. graduates from 
Canadian universities included in the survey 
was 423. Of this number 307, i.e., about 
three quarters, intended to enter employ- 
ment at the completion of their doctorate 
studies. The other 116 intended to go on to 
studies at a higher level. 

Of the 307 new doctors who were plan- 
ning to go to work after graduation, 208 
were Canadians, and of this number only 
30 had accepted employment outside 
Canada. 



Information was received in the survey 
from 165 Canadians studying in American 
universities who expected to graduate with 
a doctor's degree during the year 1960-61. 
Of this number, 114 had made definite plans 
for the immediate future; 85 had obtained 
employment, and the other 29 had decided 
to continue their studies. Of the 85 who had 
taken jobs, 57 — or about 67 per cent — stated 
that they were returning to Canada to work, 
27 were remaining in the United States, and 
one was going to Britain. 

Regarding the type of employment entered 
by the new graduates, the survey showed 
that 42 per cent of the new graduate doctors 
from Canadian universities in the science 
and engineering classes who were entering 
employment in Canada had secured em- 
ployment in universities, 30 per cent planned 
to enter federal government employment, 
and 18 per cent had obtained jobs in 
industry. 

Regarding the salaries in prospect for the 
new graduates, the lowest average annual 
salary was paid by universities — $6,500. The 
average annual salary paid by the federal 
Government was only 2 per cent higher at 
$6,630, and the average salary paid by 
industry was $7,740, which exceeded the 
university rate by 19 per cent. 

"A comparison between the average 
salaries paid by universities in Canada and 
those paid by universities in the United 
States shows a differential in favour of 
American employment of only 5 per cent," 
the report said. 

N. M. Meltz 

In a talk on "Trends in Professional Man- 
power Requirements," N. M. Meltz, Depart- 
ment of Labour, discussed the professional 
manpower situation in the country as a 
whole and also with reference to changes in 
the occupational requirements of a selected 
sample of firms in the electrical products 
industry. 

The proportion of professionals in the 
Canadian labour force has been increasing 
steadily since 1901, and with especial rapid- 
ity during the last decade, Mr. Meltz pointed 
out. By far the largest part of the increase 
has been due to the expansion of sectors of 
the economy that employ large proportions 
of professionals. He mentioned the service 
industries, particularly community service, 
as a group in which growth had been most 
marked. 

To find out the reasons for these general 
trends, the Department of Labour has been 
making studies in selected industries and 
firms, Mr. Meltz said. A pilot study of four 
firms in the electrical apparatus and sup- 
plies industry is being completed with the 



12 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



object of determining the various factors 
that affect the total numbers employed by 
a firm and the numbers employed in certain 
occupations. 

Although it was too early yet to form 
definite conclusions as a result of the study, 
it was hoped that it would provide the 
means for assessing future manpower 
requirements. 

J. P. Francis 

Investment in science and education will 
increasingly bulk large in the western 
countries' plans for promoting economic 
growth. This was the belief of the Com- 
mittee for Scientific and Technical Person- 
nel established by the Organization for 
Economic Co-operation and Development, 
which came to this conclusion at a meeting 
in Paris early in November because, al- 
though economic growth is more and more 
based on the application of scientific 
knowledge, the necessary scientific resources 
are scarce, said J. P. Francis, Director, 
Economics and Research Branch, Depart- 
ment of Labour, who was the Canadian 
representative. 

The program of action agreed upon by 
the Committee included: steps to assess 
the supply of and demand for scientific 
and technical personnel and the appropriate 
planning of investment and allocation of 
resources; development of the most 
effective means of supplying basic scientific 
and technical education; investigation into 
the ways in which industry may best train 
and make use of scientific and technical 
personnel; and provision for consultation 
between the various countries regarding the 
above objectives. 

Concerning the first of these objectives, 
Mr. Francis said, the Committee thought 
that "the study of people and their skills 
as an important part of national wealth, 
and of the economic returns from invest- 
ment in educated manpower, have been 
neglected by those contributing to economic 
theory." 

With a view to overcoming this deficiency 
two steps were decided on, "First, a study 
group on the economics of education was 
set up last year and provision was made for 
this group to continue its work throughout 
the coming year. Second, a policy conference 
on economic growth and investment in 
education was organized and held in 
Washington in September of this year." 

Another measure being undertaken was 
the carrying out in member countries of the 
Third International Survey on the demand 
for and supply of scientific and technical 
personnel. This survey would provide 



information that would serve as a guide in 
the development of the OECD'S work in 
the future, Mr. Francis said. 

He pointed out that the survey had al- 
ready shown the need for considerable 
improvement in the quality of statistics on 
the subject. As a result, one or two mem- 
ber countries had been asked to conduct 
pilot experiments in gathering and analysing 
such statistical data. 

The survey had also shown that there 
were some serious shortages of scientific 
and technical personnel in member 
countries, and attention was being especially 
concentrated on shortages of mathematicians 
and statisticians in many of these countries. 
Information on technicians was considered 
to be inadequate. 

The Committee had also agreed upon two 
proposals regarding the assessment of needs 
and resources in technical education. The 
first was that pilot teams on investment 
planning and education development should 
be established to obtain a clearer view of 
the resources needed. Several countries were 
being asked to take part in this. Secondly, 
it was agreed that an effort should be made 
to collect data on educational expenditures 
that could be used as a basis for sound 
international comparisons. 

Another project was the collection of in- 
formation regarding the plans of member 
countries for expanding higher education, 
and the comparison of these plans with 
the needs of the economies of the countries 
involved. 

In the second main sphere of action, i.e., 
that regarding the development of scientific 
and technical manpower, the Committee 
thought that, whereas in the past in several 
western countries the problem had been 
how to make the best use of the limited 
educational opportunities available, in the 
future the limiting factor might be a 
shortage of talent to take advantage of the 
opportunities offered. 

Bearing on this question, Mr. Francis 
said, a report on a conference held in 
Sweden last lune on "Ability and Educa- 
tional Opportunity in a Modern Economy" 
was being prepared and would be submitted 
to the next meeting of the OECD Com- 
mittee with proposals for action on the 
lines indicated. This conference had paid 
particular attention to those persons with 
intellectual capacity who have not been 
attracted into higher technological education. 

Another project concerns the wastage of 
university talent due to the high proportion 
of student failure. A general study on this 
is in the preparatory stage and will be con- 
tinued in 1961-62, he said. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



13 



Owing to the shortage of resources for 
expanding the teaching of scientific subjects 
in OECD member countries, the Commit- 
tee had considered the use of new methods 
of teaching science, of which the use of 
television was one. It was proposed that the 
OECD should develop two pilot experi- 
ments in the possibilities of this method of 
teaching. 

Pilot experiments conducted under the 
auspices of the Organization for European 
Economic Co-operation (the forerunner of 
OECD) concerning secondary school and 
university curricula in the sciences had 
resulted in studies that led to the issuing of 
useful reports on the modern teaching of 
mathematics, physics and chemistry in 
secondary schools. The OECD Committee 
thought that this work should be followed 
up. 

The Committee also considered that there 
should be more co-ordination in the teach- 
ing of science and mathematics in secon- 
dary schools, and that those responsible for 
the teaching of these subjects should be 
brought together for this purpose. Curricula 
in science and mathematics in universities 
should also be examined in relation to 
changes taking place in the curricula of 
secondary schools, the Committee thought. 

The third important sphere of action dis- 
cussed by the Committee was the training 
and utilization of scientific and technical 
personnel for and by industry. As the out- 
come of a conference on this subject held 
in Germany last spring, plans were under 
way for the holding of another conference 
to examine the demand for technicians, the 
development of standards of comparison 
between the various categories of technicians 
from country to country and from industry 
to industry, and the relative roles of 
industry and education in the training of 
technicians. 

It had been suggested, Mr. Francis said, 
that such a conference might be held in 
Canada some time during the latter part of 
1962, and this proposal would be considered 
at the next meeting of the OECD Commit- 
tee. 

Another result of the conference in 
Germany was that the Secretariat was 
studying possible action regarding the 
education and utilization of research 
engineers in industry, and the best ratio 
between technicians and engineers in vari- 
ous industries. 

One of the main purposes of the activities 
of the Committee, Mr. Francis said in con- 
clusion, was "that of influencing policies 
concerning the education and utilization of 
scientific and technical personnel." It was 



hoped that this would be accomplished 
through the bringing together of key people 
from the various countries concerned. 

He remarked that the activities of the 
OECD seemed to be relevant to Canadian 
interests in a number of ways, and now that 
Canada was a full member of the Organiza- 
tion it was expected that greater benefits 
would be reaped from the connection. 

Dr. W. R. Dymond 

A report on the Symposium on Education 
Investment and Economic Growth, con- 
vened by the Organization for Economic 
Co-operation and Development in Washing- 
ton in October, was given by Dr. W. R. 
Dymond, Assistant Deputy Minister of 
Labour, who attended the meeting as a 
representative of the Canadian Government. 

The conference, which was attended by 
financial and educational representatives of 
OECD member countries, addressed itself 
to two challenging questions in the field of 
education, Dr. Dymond said. These were: 
to try to measure the tasks facing educators 
within the conference's sphere of operations 
during the next decade; and to explore ways 
and means by which the developed coun- 
tries could meet the needs and requests of 
the underdeveloped countries in connection 
with their efforts to expand their educational 
services. 

Although the conference recognized that 
investment in education is necessary for eco- 
nomic growth, it did not lose sight of the 
fact that the basic purpose of education is 
not economic. It thought, however, that 
economic growth was required to enable the 
costs of education to be met. 

Moreover, the driving force of economic 
and social needs would stimulate the expan- 
sion of educational services both in the 
advanced and in the underdeveloped 
countries. 

The results of investment in education 
depend on efficient use of the sums invested, 
and some branches of education need re- 
forming to maintain efficiency. Even where 
reforms are made, expenditures on educa- 
tion are likely to double over the next 
decade. 

Most of these expenditures would be in 
secondary and higher education. 

Educational objectives should not be set 
in a vacuum but must take economic and 
social changes into consideration. This 
meant frequent revision of both techniques 
and objectives. Three necessary elements of 
sound planning of education were: good 
statistical data, a study of school enrolment, 
and a study of methods of reducing the cost 
of building schools. 



14 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



More rapid expansion of educational 
facilities would be needed in the under- 
developed countries than elsewhere, and 
such countries were not likely to be able to 
accomplish this without outside help. This 
was a problem that must be overcome if 
economic and social advance were to be 
made within the area served by the Organ- 
ization for Economic Co-operation and 
Development. 



The conference thought that the advanced 
countries should be willing to give help on 
a large scale, not only in the form of money 
but also by supplying teachers and technical 
advice. For some time it might be necessary 
for teachers for the underdeveloped coun- 
tries to be trained in the universities of the 
more advanced ones, Dr. Dymond said. 
Such help would be reflected in an improve- 
ment in the general welfare of the whole 
area served by the OECD. 



mpact of Electronic Data Processing 



High proportion of senior occupations required after introduction of electronic 
data processing is one striking characteristic of the manning of computers 



One of the striking characteristics of the 
manning of electronic data processing oper- 
ations is the high proportion of senior 
planning, administrative and programming 
occupations, in comparison with the junior 
operating ones, according to a report just 
published by the Department of Labour. 
Of the 1,216 full-time jobs that had been 
created by the introduction of electronic 
data processing (EDP) in Canada up to 
January 1, 1960, those in the high-level 
categories numbered 646, and amounted to 
53 per cent of the total. 

The establishment whose experience with 
EDP forms the basis for the report was 
able to recruit from its own employees 
personnel with the potential skills needed 
for the planning, programming and opera- 
tion of an EDP system. 

The bulletin, which is No. 9B in the 
series, "Research Program on the Training 
of Skilled Manpower," is entitled, Tech- 
nological Changes and Skilled Manpower: 
Electronic Data Processing Occupations in 
a Large Insurance Company. It is an interim 
report on the second stage of a research 
project regarding electronic data processing. 

A report on the findings of the first stage, 
a survey by questionnaire sent to all known 
Canadian users of EDP at the beginning 
of 1960, was published last year as Report 
No. 9 A in the series (L.G., May 1961, 
p. 444). The second stage is designed to 
obtain information on the impact of EDP 
on displacement, employment and unem- 
ployment, training and retraining, job con- 
tent, clerical job mix, organizational struc- 
ture and management. The data are being 
collected through field interviews at a sam- 
ple number of establishments using com- 
puters. Most of Report No. 9B is based on 
a case study of one user, a large Canadian 
insurance company. 



The bulletin points out that, as this 
interim report is based on the experience 
of one company only, "care should be 
exercised to avoid interpreting the informa- 
tion ... as a reflection of 'general practice'." 
But as information accumulates on the 
experience of individual organizations with 
EDP occupations, it is hoped that it will 
be of value to "other organizations con- 
templating or involved in EDP applications." 

The material on project planners and 
systems analysts that forms the basis for 
Chapter II of the report was derived from 
a review of the literature in Canada and 
the United States that deals with the subject. 
A bibliography is given at the end of the 
bulletin. 

The occupations covered by the report 
are: administrators, project planners, and 
systems analysts, at the highest level; pro- 
grammers, programmer operators, and cod- 
ers, at the second level; console operators 
and tape handlers; computer engineers and 
technicians; and, at the junior level, peri- 
pheral equipment operators, data typists, 
tape librarians, etc. 

Taking each of the new EDP occupations 
in turn, the bulletin describes the work 
involved in the occupation, the kind of 
people employed, how they are selected and 
trained, the kind of skill and knowledge 
required, and how those employed feel about 
their work and prospects. 

Report No. 9B was prepared by Dr. John 
C. McDonald of the Training Research 
Section, Manpower Resources Division, 
Economics and Research Branch, under the 
direction of J. P. Francis, at that time 
Chief of the Division, and the supervision 
of Philip Cohen, Section Head. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE e JANUARY 7962 



15 



Latest Labour Statistics 

(Latest available statistics at January 15, 1962) 



Principal Items 







Percentage Change 








From 




Date 


Amount 








Previous 


Previous 






Month 


Year 


December 


6,495 




0.1 


+ 


1.0 


December 


6,082 


— 


1.2 


+ 


3.0 


December 


599 


— 


4.8 


— 


1.8 


December 


5,483 


— 


0.8 


+ 


3.6 


December 


4,976 


— 


1.2 


+ 


3.0 


December 


5,174 


_ 


1.4 


+ 


2.9 


December 


769 


+ 


5.6 


+ 


2.0 


December 


139 


— 


21.9 


+ 


13.9 


December 


413 


+ 


18.3 


_ 


21.8 


December 


64 


+ 


25.5 


— 


7.3 


December 


129 


+ 


15.2 


— 


29.5 


December 


113 


+ 


14.1 


— 


26.2 


December 


61 


+ 


24.5 


+ 


1.7 


December 


46 


+ 


21.1 


— 


27.0 


December 


390 


+ 


17.8 


_ 


20.3 


December 


23 


+ 


27.8 


- 


41.0 


October 


122.8 


_ 


0.4 


+ 


1.1 


October 


112.1 


— 


0.6 


+ 


2.3 


1st 9 mos. 


56, 168 




— 


_ 


33.0 


1961 












1st 9 mos. 


27,872 






— 


37.1 


1961 












December 


42 


_ 


12.5 


+ 


44.8 


December 


22,053 


+ 


99.9 


+1,066.8 


December 


139,390 


+ 


12.5 


+ 


360.3 


October 


$79.06 


+ 


0.4 


+ 


3.2 


October 


$1.84 


+ 


1.7 


+ 


3.4 


October 


41.2 


— 


0.3 


+ 


1.2 


October 


$75.67 


+ 


0.9 


+ 


4.1 


December 


129.8 


+ 


0.1 


+ 


0.2 


October 


139.8 


+ 


0.5 


+ 


4.1 


October 


1,681 


— 


0.8 


+ 


5.1 


November 


184.3 


+ 


0.4 


+ 


7.8 


November 


163.2 


— 


0.5 


+ 


7.0 


November 


156.9 


+ 


0.5 


+ 


9.3 


November 


168.6 


— 


1.2 


+ 


5.3 



Manpower 

Total civilian labour force (a) (000) 

Employed (000) 

Agriculture (000) 

Non-agriculture (000) 

Paid workers (000) 

At work 35 hours or more (000) 

At work less than 35 hours (000) 

Employed but not at work (000) 

Unemployed (000) 

Atlantic (000) 

Quebec (000) 

Ontario (000) 

Prairie (000) 

Pacific (000) 

Without work and seeking work (000) 

On temporary layoff up to 30 days (000) 

Industrial employment (1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing employment (1949 = 100) 

Immigration 

Destined to the labour force 

Strikes and Lockouts 

Strikes and lockouts 

No. of workers involved 

Duration in man days 

Earnings and Income 

Average weekly wages and salaries (ind. comp.). . . . 

Average hourly earnings (mfg.) 

Average hours worked per week (mfg.) 

Average weekly wages (mfg.) 

Consumer price index (1949 = 100) 

Index numbers of weekly wages in 1949 dollars 

(1949 = 100) 

Total labour income $000,000 

Industrial Production 

Total (average 1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing 

Durables 

Non-durables 



(a) Distribution of these figures between male and female workers can be obtained from Labour 
Force, a monthly publication of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. See also page 624, July 1961 issue. 



16 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



Manpower Situation, Fourth Quarter, 1961 

The pace of economic activity, which fourth quarters. The relatively small decline 

began to quicken in the second quarter of in manufacturing was particularly encourag- 

1961, gained momentum as the year pro- ing: the employment drop from the third 

gressed. By the end of the year, the advances to fourth quarter amounted to 19,000 com- 

in output and employment had spread to a pared with decreases of 41,000 in 1959 and 

large number of industries. 34,000 in 1960. 

The underlying trend of unemployment Construction employment also held up 
declined steadily during the fourth quarter better than usual. This improvement was 
and the unemployment level in December influenced in part by the fact that favour- 
was substantially lower than the year before. able weather extended into December. At 

A noteworthy feature of the recent the same time there was some evidence of 

advances in output and employment was renewed strengthening in certain sectors of 

the strength of the demand forces that non-residential construction that were 

earlier had exerted a moderating influence sources of weakness earlier in the year, 

upon the developing economic recovery. Forestry employment increased more than 

Outlays for new plant and equipment in- seasonally during the final quarter of 1961, 

creased substantially after mid-year after although the level was still somewhat lower 

declining for two consecutive quarters, and than the year before. The improvement was 

housing, which showed signs of tapering off concentrated in the two coastal regions. In 

in the second quarter, followed an upward Quebec, the increase in forestry employment 

course during the last half of the year. during the fourth quarter was less than 

Consumer spending, one of the expan- usual, 

sive elements during the first half of 1961, The service mdustry showe d a slightly 

increased at a faster rate during the second better than seasonal rise in employment 

half as a result of advancing income levels. bet ween the third and fourth quarter As 

In the third quarter, consumer expenditures the table below showSj the advance was 

(goods and services) showed a rise of 4.3 some what smaller than a year ago, how- 

P er cent over the figure for the correspond- evei , It win be rem embered that, through- 

ing period of 1960. Much of the increased out 1960? employment in the service 

spending was for services and durable goods. industry showed a remarkable rate of 

In addition to these encouraging develop- growth; demands were particularly strong in 

ments, the economy continued to receive occupations that employ a high proportion 

support from the government sector and of women. On the other hand, durable 

from exports. Expenditures at all levels of goods manufacturing industries, which 

government increased during the third employ mainly men, showed a substantial 

quarter and showed no signs of abatement decline during this period. The net result 

during the closing quarter. Merchandise was a disproportionate rise in women's 

exports increased sharply in October (the employment during 1960. By contrast, the 

most recent month for which data are employment expansion during the past year, 

available) and were up about 15 per cent and more particularly in recent months, was 

from the corresponding month of 1960. For most marked among men> In the fourth 

the first 10 months the value of exports to ter employed men avera ged 82,000 

all countries showed a rise of a little better u her than eadi me number of 

than 4 per cent. i j An Ann u- u 

. , , . . __ . , employed women was 49,000 higher. 

A sharp rise in shipments to the United JL 

States accounted for much of the year-to- The chan 8 e m employment between the 

year increase. Exports to the U.S. showed a third ^ d fourth quarters of 1961 and 1960, 

substantial pickup since mid-summer, but b y industry and by sex, was: 

for the first 10 months they were only 2 per 1961 i960 

cent above the level of the previous year. Men —191 —233 

The recent advances in the value of ship- Women + 8 + 27 

ments to the U.S. were probably influenced A Vr^TrT . ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! -if 9 iS? 

to some extent by the economic recovery Forestry +17 +9 

that has taken place in that country. A Fishing, trapping .... — 13 — 9 

significant factor in the rise, however, was Mining, quarrying .... +2 - 9 

the decline in the value of the Canadian }£S2£E*.. "\\\" - « - 55 

dollar. Transportation — 20 — 23 

Reflecting the improvements in these £j£J£ Utilities - ^3 

basic demand factors, employment declined France",' in'surance*. '.'. *. - 3 -3 

less than seasonally between the third and Service +37 +46 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY J 962 17 



INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION 

Selected Industries 
(seasonally adjusted) 

INDEX 1949 - 100 





165 
160 
155 
150 
145 
140 
135 



CLOTHING 




PAPER PRODUCTS 




i:::;*:;:;<S;»:;:::j:^:i:;t:::.:<:::i:.rO;ti:i<:»i<:::i*-^;i:i*i>-t:i>-J. Ml I 1 t I I 

JFMAMJJ'ASOND JFMAMJJASOND 
1960 1961 



The improvement in manufacturing dur- 
ing the fourth quarter was on a broad base, 
sizeable employment gains being recorded in 
motor vehicles, electrical apparatus, ship- 
building, rubber products and textiles. The 
railway rolling stock industry showed some 
improvement from the low level of the 
previous quarter and there were moderate 
advances in paper products, leather, sheet- 
metal products and fabricated steel. 
Employment in primary iron and steel, 
which had been rising steadily since the 
beginning of the year, showed little change 
during the quarter. Agricultural implements 
was the only industry that experienced a 
significant employment decline. Activity in 
this industry was at a relatively low level 
all year. 

A year-over-year comparison (quarterly 
averages) shows a rise in manufacturing 
employment of 83,000; all major industries 
except agricultural implements and railway 
rolling stock shared in the advance. As 
indicated earlier, some of the largest gains 
took place among durable goods industries, 
which bore the brunt of the slowdown in 
economic activity during 1960. 

Employment in the electrical apparatus 
and supplies industries increased by 7 per 
cent over the year, regaining all of the 
earlier losses. Other industries that showed 
sizeable gains were shipbuilding, aircraft 
and motor vehicles. 

In all major manufacturing industries the 
recovery in production proceeded at a 
faster pace than that in employment. This 
development is not unusual in the early 
stages of recovery. The difference between 
production and employment trends was 
most marked in the primary iron and steel 
industry, where industrial production (sea- 
sonally adjusted) rose by 38 per cent 
between January and October, compared 
with an employment rise of only 4 per cent. 

The shipbuilding industry made a partic- 
ularly strong comeback during 1961. In 
October, employment was 20 per cent 
higher than a year earlier and 7 per cent 
higher than in October 1959. The revival 
in shipbuilding activity can be traced in 
part to the introduction of shipbuilding sub- 
sidies and other measures designed to assist 
the industry. 

In non-manufacturing industries, the 
largest year-to-year employment gain was 
in service. During the fourth quarter, serv- 
ice employment averaged 66,000 higher 
than a year earlier. Employment in trade 
was slightly lower, on average, than in the 
closing quarter of 1960 but in finance and 
insurance it was a little higher. Employ- 
ment in industry groups other than manu- 
facturing was much the same as a year ago. 



u 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



NDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION 

Selected Industries 
(seasonally adjusted) 



INDEX 1949 - 100 



WOOD PRODUCTS 




IRON AND STEEL 
PRODUCTS 




Most reports from across the country 
indicate that the upward trend in manu- 
facturing employment is expected to con- 
tinue into 1962. Consumer demand has been 
generally on the upswing and has shown 
signs of being reinforced by an accelerated 
rise in labour income. Inventories were 
generally low at the end of the year so 
that some buildup of stocks can be expected 
during the early part of 1962. Another 
factor that might be expected to influence 
the course of manufacturing employment in 
the months ahead is the improved competi- 
tive position of many Canadian industries, 
particularly those producing steel, motor 
vehicles, shipbuilding and other durables. The 
outlook for construction is also fairly en- 
couraging. Housing starts in the second half 
of the year were up substantially from the 
corresponding period of 1960 and the same 
comparison of contract awards indicates sig- 
nificant gains for all sectors of construction. 

Unemployment 

Unemployment showed a smaller-than- 
seasonal increase between the third and 
fourth quarter. As a result, the average level 
of unemployment in the fourth quarter was 
sharply lower than a year earlier. 

In December an estimated 413,000 per- 
sons were unemployed; this number repre- 
sented 6.4 per cent of the labour force. A 
year before the figure was 528,000, repre- 
senting 8.2 per cent of the labour force. 
All five major regions showed lower unem- 
ployment rates than a year ago, and the 
rates were lower in all industries and 
occupations. The greatest improvement was 
in manufacturing and construction. 

Almost all of the year-to-year drop in 
unemployment was among men. In Decem- 
ber, unemployed men totalled 355,000 com- 
pared with 465,000 a year earlier. The 
number of unemployed women was 58,000, 
down 5,000 over the year. 

The basic strengthening in manufactur- 
ing and construction in the last half of 1961, 
and the fact that the employment demand 
has been mainly for men, has been an 
important factor in reducing unemployment: 
workers to fill these jobs have been drawn 
mainly from the unemployed. 

This fact is significant when compared 
with the persistently high level of unemploy- 
ment in 1960, when a large part of the 
workers needed in the expanding service 
industry were women, drawn to a large 
extent from outside the labour force. 

The increase in jobs for men in 1960 was 
much slower than the growth of the labour 
force. Developments in 1961 have reversed 

this trend with the result that unemploy- JFMAMJJAS ondjfmamjjasond 
ment has dropped sharply. ■ , 

1960 1961 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



145 
140 
135 
130 
125 
120 



TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT- 145 




ELECTRICAL APPARATUS 
AND SUPPLIES 



155 




19 



Regional Manpower Situation 

ATLANTIC 



The employment decline in the Atlantic 
region during the fourth quarter of 1961 
was in line with seasonal expectations. 
Total employment averaged 546,000 in the 
fourth quarter, up 3.4 per cent from the 
average in the closing quarter of 1960. Non- 
farm industries accounted for almost two- 
thirds of this advance. The increase in 
unemployment in the fourth quarter was 
smaller than usual for this time of year, and 
the unemployment average was lower than 
that a year earlier. 

Employment developments in manu- 
facturing during the fourth quarter were 
mixed. Wood and paper products industries 
showed increasing signs of strength, and 
employment in these industry groups was 
substantially higher than in the closing 
quarter of 1960. Aircraft and steel fabricat- 
ing plants were very busy, and some rehiring 
was reported. Employment in primary iron 
and steel, on the other hand, remained low, 
although prospects improved during the 
closing months of 1961. 

The main continuing weakness in manu- 
facturing was the extended decline in rail- 
way rolling stock production that stemmed 
from a shortage of orders. After a very low 
level of operations during the first six 
months in 1961, there was some improve- 
ment in the third quarter after receipt of an 
order for 300 boxcars. This improvement 
was of short duration, however, and by 
early November employment had fallen to 
the low level that existed during the first 
half of the year. 

The shipbuilding industry maintained 
a high level of activity during the fourth 
quarter and shortages of many types of 
skilled tradesmen continued. Employment in 
October was about 13 per cent higher than 
the year before. The employment recovery 
in this industry during 1961 was influenced 
in part by the new capital subsidies offered 
by the federal Government. 

The increase in forestry employment dur- 
ing the fourth quarter was larger than usual. 



The improvement was most noticeable in 
New Brunswick, although increases were 
fairly general throughout the region. Con- 
struction activity was maintained at a high 
level during the late fall and early winter as 
favourable weather aided outdoor work. The 
drop in construction employment during 
December was one of the smallest in recent 
years. In the fourth quarter, employment 
averaged about 12 per cent higher than in 
the previous year. Both residential and non- 
residential construction shared in this year- 
to-year advance. 

Employment in coal mining declined 
temporarily during December as production 
cutbacks resulted in the closing for one 
week of one of the Sydney collieries. Apart 
from this development, the level of coal 
mining employment was unchanged from 
that in the third quarter but was a little 
lower than in the fourth quarter of 1960. 

Total employment in the fourth quarter 
of 1961 averaged about 18,000 higher than 
a year earlier. As indicated earlier, the main 
improvement was in forestry and construc- 
tion. Manufacturing employment was 
slightly higher than in the closing quarter 
of 1960; the significant gains were in ship- 
building, wood and paper products and air- 
craft. Unemployment in the fourth quarter 
was consistently lower than the year before. 
In December, the classification of the 21 
areas in the region (last year's figures in 
brackets) was: in substantial surplus, 17 
(18); in moderate surplus, 4 (3). 

Local Area Developments 

St. John's (metropolitan): Employment was 
substantially higher than last year, mainly 
as a result of increased activity in the con- 
struction industry. 

Halifax (metropolitan): Year-to-year employ- 
ment advances were fairly general in this 
area. In October, industrial employment was 
about 7 per cent higher than a year earlier. 



QUEBEC 



In the Quebec region, employment 
declined much less between the third and 
fourth quarters than in any corresponding 
period since 1956 and, in December, was 
substantially higher than a year earlier. The 
industries accounting for most of the 
improvement were the manufacturing and 
service industries. The gains in these indus- 
tries were partly offset by losses in forestry 
and trade. The gains in employment were 



achieved at a time when industry was 
increasing its efforts to reduce costs of 
production. 

The continuing improvement in economic 
activity in Quebec was most noticeable in 
manufacturing, where improvement in 
employment was evident throughout the 
year, particularly the fourth quarter. As 
in most of the previous periods of recovery, 
manufacturing employment in the fourth 



20 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



quarter of 1961 did not decline from the 
third quarter; in the corresponding quarter 
of 1960 it declined 4.5 per cent. 

The upturn in manufacturing took place 
on a fairly broad basis; durable and non- 
durable consumer goods and, to some 
degree, capital goods shared in the gain. 
Both domestic demand and exports contrib- 
uted to the increase in orders for manu- 
factured products. The increase in exports 
was due, in part, to the decline in the ex- 
change value of the Canadian dollar, which, 
along with import quotas, was also 
responsible for the reduction in imports of 
certain finished goods. It is worth noting, 
however, that increases in production were 
not always matched by equal gains in 
employment. 

In the industries producing non-durable 
consumer goods, production and employ- 
ment in the textile industry rose above the 
level of the previous quarter and remained 
consistently higher than the year before. 
New demand for pulp and paper products 
resulted in increased production and ship- 
ments but had little or no effect on employ- 
ment. Employment in most other non- 
durable producing industries showed small 
seasonal declines but exceeded the previous 
year's level. 

In the durable goods industries, electrical 
apparatus and supplies reported a slight 
improvement in employment over the 
quarter and a considerable increase over the 
year. The iron and steel products industry 
showed little change. There was some new 
activity in shipbuilding and railway rolling 
stock, the improvement in the latter result- 
ing mainly from exports. 

The service industry experienced a size- 
able employment gain between the third 
and fourth quarter compared with a drop in 



the corresponding period a year earlier. 
Employment in finance and public utilities 
remained unchanged. Trade showed a con- 
siderable loss in employment over the 
quarter as well as over the year. The value 
of sales, however, was substantially higher 
in October 1961, than in October 1960, and 
indications are that this trend continued 
throughout the fourth quarter. 

Construction employment declined sea- 
sonally over the quarter but at a smaller 
rate than in 1960; it was still slightly lower 
than a year earlier, however. The decline 
was due mostly to non-residential construc- 
tion, particularly the low level of industrial 
and road construction. Residential con- 
struction was at a high level: housing 
starts in the fourth quarter were up con- 
siderably from the previous quarter and 
the previous year. 

Activity in forestry continued at a normal 
pace, and employment increased seasonally 
during the quarter. Over the year, however, 
employment showed a substantial decline, 
reflecting in part increased mechanization of 
forestry operations. 

Unemployment in the region increased 
less than seasonally between the third and 
fourth quarter and was, on average, about 
one-fifth lower than in the fourth quarter 
of 1960. As a proportion of the labour 
force, unemployment averaged 6.5 per cent 
in the last quarter of 1961, compared with 
8.3 per cent a year earlier. 

The lower level of employment in the 
region was reflected in the labour market 
classifications of the local areas. In Decem- 
ber these areas were classified as follows 
(last year's figures in brackets): in sub- 
stantial surplus 17 (21); in moderate surplus 
7(3). 



ONTARIO 



The employment decline in Ontario 
between the third and fourth quarters was 
in line with seasonal movements. In the 
fourth quarter, employment averaged 
2,287,000, about 2 per cent lower than the 
average for the previous quarter. Farm 
employment accounted for most of the 
decline; non-farm employment remained 
virtually unchanged. 

Manufacturing employment moved up 
slightly in the fourth quarter. Noteworthy 
was a perceptible rise in automobile pro- 
duction: output of motor vehicles more 
than doubled between the third and fourth 
quarters, as the production of new model 
cars climbed more rapidly than usual. This 
resulted in a substantial employment in- 
crease, despite a much slower rise in the 



output of parts and accessories. Employ- 
ment in the electrical products industries 
rose moderately in the fourth quarter as 
increased sales of household appliances and 
television receivers lowered inventories; 
another contributing factor was the rising 
backlog of orders for heavy electrical 
equipment. Minor employment gains took 
place in aircraft, rubber products, furni- 
ture, textiles and clothing. Noteworthy 
among the steadying factors was the 
primary iron and steel industry, which con- 
tinued to operate at near capacity level. 
Offsetting employment declines took place 
in saw and planing mills, canning and meat 
plants, and in establishments producing 
agricultural implements. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



21 



Construction employment declined less 
than usual in the fourth quarter, as 
non-residential construction appeared to 
strengthen. Road and residential construc- 
tion fell off seasonally. Meanwhile, the close 
of the navigation season brought layoffs in 
the transportation industry. 

Once the harvests were completed in early 
November, farm activity was confined 
mostly to the feeding of livestock. Forestry 
operations increased seasonally over the 
quarter, and employment in mining was 
stable. In the service -producing industries, 
the only significant employment change was 
in the service industry proper, where a 
moderate rise in employment occurred. 

In comparison with a year ago, total 
employment for the fourth quarter moved 
ahead by 1.5 per cent. Altogether, some 
60,000 new jobs were made available in 
non-farm industries, whereas there was a 
decline of 23,000 in farm employment. 

Manufacturing accounted for about half 
of the increase in non-farm employment. 
Most of this strength was in durable goods, 
but primary iron and steel, aircraft, auto- 
mobiles, electrical goods and non-metallic 
mineral products also showed important 
gains. Among the non-durables, the boot 



and shoe industry stood out particularly 
well. The sustained growth of the trade, 
finance and service industries also resulted 
in a substantial employment increase. Some- 
what offsetting the upward trend in employ- 
ment were the small declines registered in 
mining, transportation and construction. In 
the latter, employment lagged a little behind 
that of a year ago despite the more buoyant 
state of residential, business and industrial 
construction. 

The number of employed men was esti- 
mated to be 34,000 higher in December 
1961 than in the corresponding month the 
previous year, and the number of employed 
women increased by an estimated 17,000. 

Unemployment increased less than sea- 
sonally between the third and fourth 
quarters. It averaged 101,000, or 4.2 per 
cent of the labour force, in the fourth 
quarter compared with 133,000, or 5.6 
per cent of the labour force, in the same 
period a year earlier. 

In December, the classification of the 34 
labour market areas in the region (last 
year's figures in brackets) was as follows: in 
substantial surplus, 5 (13); in moderate 
surplus, 26 (21); in balance, 3 (0). 



PRAIRIE 



Employment in the Prairie region fol- 
lowed the seasonal pattern in the fourth 
quarter but at a higher level than a year 
earlier. A drop of 63,000 in the number 
employed in the region between the third 
and fourth quarter represented, for the most 
part, a seasonal decline in the farm work 
force following the grain harvest. Non-farm 
employment decreased by only 6,000 during 
the period, a somewhat smaller decline than 
usual. 

The total number employed in the fourth 
quarter was 3 per cent higher than in the 
fourth quarter of 1961, the main increases 
being in agriculture, manufacturing and the 
service industry. Women accounted for 
about two thirds of this employment gain. 

The farm work force declined seasonally 
after harvesting the grain crop, which was 
the poorest in more than two decades, but 
continued slightly higher than a year earlier. 
It should be noted that all of the increase 
in the number employed on farms was 
attributed to unpaid family workers. 

Labour demand in non-farm industries 
was generally strong, employment being 2 
per cent higher than a year earlier. Manu- 
facturing was responsible for a major part 
of the increased demand. Output and 



employment in the iron and steel products 
industry in particular was much higher than 
a year earlier. 

The increase in the number of employed 
women reflected the steady expansion of 
educational and health services. In addi- 
tion to the temporary requirements for the 
holiday season, there was a continuing 
demand for women workers in a consider- 
able number of professional and skilled 
occupations. 

Construction employment in the fourth 
quarter was no higher than a year earlier 
but the volume of work on hand was in- 
creasing considerably. The recovery in 
residential construction in 1961 was stronger 
in the Prairies than in other regions; the 
number of housing units under construction 
in the fourth quarter was up 26 per cent 
over that a year earlier. Non-residential 
construction lagged through most of 1961, 
but higher values of contract awards for 
non-residential building projects during the 
last half of the year indicated a firmer trend 
in this section of the industry. 

The growth in the labour force over the 
year matched the increase in employment. 
Consequently, the unemployment level in 
the fourth quarter was about the same or 



22 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



slightly higher than a year earlier. At the 
end of the year, the classification of the 19 
labour market areas in the region was as 



follows (last year's figures in brackets): 
in substantial surplus, 8 (8); in moderate 
surplus, 11 (10); in balance, (1). 



PACIFIC 



Employment conditions in the Pacific 
region in the fourth quarter of 1961, apart 
from seasonal variations, showed little 
change from the previous quarter but were 
more favourable than a year before. The 
number employed declined seasonally 
between the third and the fourth quarter but 
was almost 3 per cent higher than a year 
earlier. This rate of growth was much 
higher than in three out of the four 
immediately preceding years. All of the 
improvement was due to non-agricultural 
industries; agricultural employment dropped 
sharply over the quarter as well as over 
the year. 

The service-producing industries showed 
the greatest strength during the quarter; total 
employment was slightly higher than in the 
third quarter and substantially higher than 
in the same quarter of 1960. The greatest 
year-to-year increase occurred in the service 
industry proper but there was also a sub- 
stantial rise in employment in trade, from 
the previous quarter as well as from the 
previous year. Employment in transporta- 
tion, which had been weakening since the 
middle of the year, picked up considerably 
in the latter part of the fourth quarter as a 
result of large shipments of grain and 
forestry products. 

Reduced activity in the non-ferrous metal 
industry and earlier completion of the 
seasonal work in canning and food process- 
ing were mainly responsible for a larger- 
than-usual decline in manufacturing employ- 
ment between the third and fourth quarter. 
The decrease in employment in the wood 
products industry was about normal for this 
time of year. The number employed in 
manufacturing, however, was still higher than 



a year before, owing mostly to a well-main- 
tained level of employment in iron and steel 
products and a noticeable recovery in ship- 
building. 

Activity in construction declined seasonal- 
ly; layoffs occurred particularly in the north- 
ern and high-lying areas, where unfavourable 
weather hampered outdoor work. Construc- 
tion employment continued below the level 
of the previous year, although the year-to- 
year gap narrowed somewhat in the fourth 
quarter. The weakness in the construction 
industry lay in the non-residential sector; 
residential construction was much higher 
than the previous year throughout the fourth 
quarter. 

Conditions in the forestry industry im- 
proved greatly both over the previous 
quarter and the previous year. Employment 
showed a substantial rise during the quarter, 
in contrast to the large drop in the same 
quarter a year earlier, and the rate of 
growth over the year was larger than in any 
of the major industries in the region. The 
improvement was due mainly to increased 
demand for lumber abroad, owing in part 
to the development of new markets for low 
grade lumber. 

Unemployment declined more than sea- 
sonally over the quarter and was about 28 
per cent lower than in the fourth quarter of 
1960. As a proportion of the labour force, 
unemployment was 6.7 per cent in the 
fourth quarter compared with 9.5 per cent a 
year earlier. 

In December, the 12 labour market areas 
in the region were classified as follows (last 
year's figures in brackets) : in substantial sur- 
plus, 5 (6); in moderate surplus, 6 (5); in 
balance, 1 (1). 



LABOUR MARKET CONDITIONS 





Labour Surplus 


Approximate 
Balance 


Labour Market Areas 


1 


2 


3 




December 
1961 


December 
1960 


December 
1961 


December 
1960 


December 
1961 


December 
1960 




6 
14 

6 
26 


9 
17 

6 
34 


6 
11 

8 
29 


3 
9 

8 
22 


1 
3 








Major Agricultural 




Minor 


2 






Total 


52 


66 


54 


42 


4 


2 







THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



23 



CLASSIFICATION OF LABOUR MARKET AREAS-DECEMBER 





SUBSTANTIAL 


MODERATE 


APPROXIMATE 


LABOUR 




LABOUR SURPLUS 


LABOUR SURPLUS 


BALANCE 


SHORTAGE 




Group 1 


Group 2 


Group 3 


Group 4 




CALGARY -< — 


Edmonton 








QUEBEC-LEVIS -< — 


Halifax 






METROPOLITAN AREAS 


St. John's 
Vancouver-New 


Hamilton 
Montreal 






(labour force 75,000 or more) 


Westminster 
Windsor 
WINNIPEG ■< 


Ottawa-Hull 
Toronto 








BRANTFORD -< 


Guelph 


London 






CORNER BROOK -4, 


Kingston 
KITCHENER -< — 








CORNWALL ■< 








FARNHAM-GRANBY -< 


Oshawa 








FT. WILLIAM-PT. 


Peterborough 








ARTHUR -< 


Rouyn-Val d'Or 






MAJOR INDUSTRIAL AREAS 


JOLIETTE ■< 

Lac St. Jean 

MONCTON «< 


Saint John 

Sarnia 

SUDBURY -< 






(labour force 25,000-75.000; 60 






per cent or more in non-agricul- 


NEW GLASGOW «< 


Timmins- 






tural activity) 


NIAGARA 

PENINSULA «< 

SHAWINIGAN «< 

SHERBROOKE •< — 

Sydney 

TROIS RIVIERES ■< 


Kirkland Lake 








CHARLOTTETOWN •< 


Barrie 








LETHBRIDGE -< 


BRANDON *< 






MAJOR AGRICULTURAL 
AREAS 


PRINCE ALBERT -< 

RIVIERE DU LOUP «< 


Chatham 
Moose Jaw 






(labour force 25,000-75,000; 40 


THETFORD-LAC 
MEGANTIC- 


NORTH 
BATTLEFORD -< 






per cent or more in agriculture) 


ST. GEORGES -< 

YORKTON ■< 


Red Deer 

Regina 

Saskatoon 
















BATHURST -< 


Beauharnois 


Kitimat 






BRACEBRIDGE -< — 


Belleville-Trenton 


Stratford 






BRIDGE WATER «< 


BRAMPTON -< 


Woodstock- 






CAMPBELLTON -< 


Cranbrook 


Tillsonburg 






CENTRAL VANCOUVER 


Dawson Creek 








ISLAND -< — 


DRUMHELLER -< 








Chilliwack 


Drummondville 








Dauphin 


Fredericton 








EDMUNDSTON «< 


GALT ^ 








Gaspe 


GODERICH -< 








GRAND FALLS -< 


Kamloops 








MONTMAGNY •< 


KENTVILLE -< 






MINOR AREAS 


NEWCASTLE ■< — 


Lachute-St. Therese 






(labour force 10,000 to 25,000) 


Okanagan Valley 

PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE^ 

PR I NCE RUPERT -< 

QUEBEC NORTH 

SHORE «< — 
Rimouski 
ST. AGATHE-ST. 

JEROME -< — 
St. Stephen 
SOREL -< 


Lindsay 

LISTOWEL « 

Medicine Hat 
North Bay 
Owen Sound 
Pembroke 

PRINCE GEORGE- 
— >- QUESNEL 

ST. HYACINTHE *< — 
St. Jean 
St. Thomas 








SUMMERSIDE «< 








TRURO «< 


Sault Ste. Marie 








VALLEYFIELD «< 


SIMCOE -< 








VICTORIAVILLE -< — 


Swift Current 








WOODSTOCK, N.B. « 


Trail-Nelson 








YARMOUTH -< 


WALKERTON -< 

Weyburn 







^-The areas shown in capital letters are those that have been reclassified during the month; an arrow indicates the group from which they 

moved. For an explanation of the classificatian used, see page 624, July 1961 issue. 



24 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



Collective Bargaining Review 



Economics and Research Branch 



Collective Bargaining in December 



Settlements covering large numbers of 
automobile, steel and cement workers high- 
lighted the Canadian collective bargaining 
scene in December. 

In the automobile industry, the United 
Auto Workers continued negotiations with 
each of the Big Three automobile manu- 
facturers and concluded a three-year con- 
tract expiring October 31, 1964 with 
General Motors. This settlement was 
reached after three months of collective 
bargaining and a three-day strike at seven 
General Motors plants. 

The General Motors agreement, covering 
approximately 16,000 employees, provides 
for three annual improvement factor wage 
increases (6 cents an hour or 2\ per cent, 
whichever is greater) each year of the con- 
tract, and continues the cost of living 
allowance formula (1$ for each .6 points 
change in the consumer price index) 
from the previous contract. However, 2 
cents of the annual improvement factor 
increase due in December 1961 and 1 cent 
of the cost of living allowance due in 
October 1961 will be applied to the cost of 
company-paid welfare plans. 

Improved fringe benefits constituted a 
significant part of the new agreement, which 
provided for higher benefits and longer 
benefit periods. Pensions, group insurance, 
S.U.B. and jury duty pay were increased, 
and the periods for receiving S.U.B. and 
jury pay were extended. A new feature was 
added to the S.U.B. plan: a short week 
benefit, which will compensate employees 
laid off for part of a week and ineligible 
for unemployment insurance benefits be- 
cause of their earnings. General Motors 
agreed to assume the full cost of hospital 
and medical coverage and group insurance, 
which hitherto had been contributory plans. 
Furthermore, half -paid hospital and medical 
coverage was to be provided for pensioners. 

Negotiations between the United Auto 
Workers and Ford continued, in the mean- 
time, with the Ford employees at Windsor, 
Oakville and North York voting for strike 
action in support of their demands. A con- 
ciliation board met with the parties late in 
the month but concluded that its recom- 
mendations would be of little assistance. A 
strike deadline was subsequently set for 
midnight January 12. 

Talks between the United Auto Workers 
and Chrysler entered the conciliation board 
stage, but there was to be no hearing until 
January 24. 



In the steel industry, negotiations between 
the Steelworkers and Algoma Steel came to 
a close when the parties reached a three- 
year agreement expiring July 24, 1964. 
The negotiators had reached a basis for 
settlement in November, but this was 
rejected by the union membership. Early in 
December, another vote was held; this time 
the union members ratified the contract. 

The new agreement provides for a wage 
increase of 41 cents an hour retroactive to 
August 1, 1961 and a further increase of 5 
cents an hour effective August 1, 1963. In- 
cluded in the contract is an incremental 
increase of i cent between job classes, 
raising the increment to 6i cents, and 
provision for a higher pension, amounting 
to $3.15 a month per year of service 
(formerly $3.00). Group insurance was 
also increased from $3,500 to $5,000. 

Under the terms of the settlement, 
Algoma Steel undertook to make contribu- 
tions on behalf of employees who elect to 
participate in a new union-sponsored health 
centre, the first of its kind in Canada. This 
will allow employees the option of receiving 
medical care from the union health centre 
or, alternatively, from their own personal 
physicians under an insurance plan. 

In the course of negotiations between 
the Steelworkers and the Steel Company of 
Canada, conciliation board hearings were 
opened in December. 

There was considerable bargaining activity 
in the transportation industry during 
December. The Seafarers had been negotiat- 
ing with Canada Steamship Lines and the 
Lake Carriers' Association since October. 
The Air Line Pilots and T.C.A. continued 
their negotiations, which had been in 
progress for nearly a year. In the trucking 
industry, the Teamsters continued to bargain 
for master agreements with the Motor 
Transport Labour Relations Council in 
British Columbia and the Motor Transport 
Industrial Relations Bureau in Ontario and 
Quebec. 

Throughout December, talks continued 
between the Teamsters and ten Ontario car 
carrying firms, also represented by the 
Motor Transport Industrial Relations Bureau 
to end a strike involving more than 800 
drivers and mechanics that had been called 
late in November. By the end of December, 
agreement appeared in sight, but the pro- 
posed terms of settlement were turned 
down by the union membership. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



25 



Meetings between the Teamsters and the ment. The Toronto agreement embodies 

Trucking Association of Quebec in Montreal three across-the-board increases of 4 cents 

led to a three-year agreement calling for an nour > and tne Winnipeg settlement 

annual increases of 8 cents an hour and P rov ^f fo J* 2-per-cent increase January 

~;„u* ««;^ u~uA n „o rt ~-j« — ^ 1> 1962 and 2i per cent the following year. 

eight paid holidays (formerly seven). ' . . * ^^m , rn „ 

During the month, the C.N.R. and C.P.R. 

In municipal transportation the Street announced that they had accepted the 

Railway Employees concluded two-year majority reports of the conciliation boards 

agreements with the Toronto Transit Com- that had been set up in the railways' 

mission and the Winnipeg Transit Depart- (Continued on page 9$) 

Collective Bargaining Scene 

Agreements covering 500 or more employees, 

excluding those in the construction industry 

Part I— Agreements Expiring During January, February and March 

(except those under negotiation in December) 

Company and Location Union 

Acme, Borden's & other dairies, Toronto, Ont Teamsters (Ind.) 

Aluminum Co., Kingston, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Assn. des Marchands Detaillants (Produits 

Alimentaires), Quebec, Que Commerce Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Auto dealers, garages (various), Vancouver, B.C. Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.C. Telephone & susidiaries B.C. Telephone Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Burns & Co. (Eastern), Kitchener, Ont Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Burns & Co. (6 plants), Western Canada Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Canada Packers (8 plants), Canada-wide Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. Celanese, Sorel, Que Textile Wkrs. Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dairies, (various), Vancouver & New West- 
minster, B.C Teamsters (Ind.) 

Dom. Engineering Works, Lachine, Que Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dow Brewery, Montreal & Quebec, Que Brewery Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Electric Auto-Lite, Sarnia, Ont Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Falconbridge Nickel, Falconbridge, Ont Mine, Mill & Smelter Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Firestone Tire & Rubber, Hamilton, Ont Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Ford of Canada, Windsor, Ont Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (office empl.) 

Glove Mfrs. Assn., Montreal, St. Raymond, 

Loretteville, St. Tite, Que Clothing Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber, New Toronto, Ont Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hotel Chateau Frontenac, (C.P.R.), Quebec, 

Que Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC) 

Hotel Empress, (C.P.R.), Victoria, B.C Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC) 

Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver, B.C Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC) 

International Nickel, Port Colborne, Ont Mine, Mill & Smelter Wkrs. (Ind.) 

International Nickel, Sudbury, Ont Mine, Mill & Smelter Wkrs. (Ind.) 

John Inglis, Toronto, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Manitoba Power Commission I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Manitoba Telephone Man. Telephone Assn. (Ind.) (clerical empl.) 

Manitoba Telephone I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (linemen) 

Manitoba Telephone I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC (telephone operators) 

Miramichi Lumber, Chatham Industries & 

others, Miramichi Ports, N.B Miramichi Trades & Labour (Ind.) 

Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Motor Trans. Ind. Relations Bureau (north. 

general freight), Ont Teamsters (Ind.) 

Pacific Press, Vancouver, B.C Newspaper Guild (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Philips Electronics, Toronto, Ont I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Ready-mix concrete (4 cos.), Toronto, Ont Teamsters (Ind.) 

Sask. Government Sask. Civil Service (Ind.) (labour services) 

Shawinigan Chemicals, Shawinigan, Que CNTU-chartered local 

Steinberg's Ltd., Island of Montreal, Que Empl. Protective Assn. (Ind.) 

Swift Cdn., (6 plants), Canada-wide Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto City, Ont Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

Toronto City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Toronto Metro. Municipality, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

Toronto Metro. Municipality, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Vancouver City, B.C Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Vancouver Police Commissioners Bd., B.C B.C. Peace Officers (CLC) 

Part II— Negotiations in Progress During December 

Bargaining 

Company and Location Union 

Anaconda American Brass, New Toronto, Ont. Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Asbestos Corp. & others, Thetford Mines, Que. Mining Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

26 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



Company and Location Union 

Assn. Patronale des Services Hospitaliers, (5 

hospitals), Drummondville & other points, Que. Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Automatic Electric, Brockville, Ont I.U.E. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Avro & Orenda Engines, Malton, Ont Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) (salaried empl.) 

Babcock-Wilcox & Goldie-McCulloch, Gait, Ont. Nat. Council of Cdn. Labour (Ind.) 

B.C. Electric, company-wide Office Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC> 

Bindery room employers, Toronto, Ont Bookbinders (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Brewers' Warehousing, province-wide, Ont Brewery Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Building material supplies, Vancouver & 

Fraser Valley, B.C Teamsters (Ind.) 

Calgary General Hospital, Calgary, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) 

Can. Steamship Lines, Ont. & Que Seafarers (AFL-CIO) 

Cdn. Canners, Vancouver, Penticton, & Ashcroft, 

B.C Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. Celanese, Drummondville, Que Textile Wkrs. Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. Industries Ltd., Millhaven, Ont Oil Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. Johns-Manville, Asbestos, Que Mining Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Cdn. Marconi, Montreal, Que Salaried Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

Cdn. Steel Foundries, Montreal, Que Steel & Foundry Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Clothing Mfrs. Assn., Quebec, Farnham & 

Victoriaville, Que Clothing Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Cluett Peabody, Kitchener & Stratford, Ont Amalgamated Clothing Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

C.N.R., C.P.R., other railways, system-wide 15 unions (non-operating empl.) 

Consolidated Mining & Smelting, Kimberley & 

Trail, B.C Mine, Mill & Smelter Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Dominion Glass, Hamilton, Ont Glass & Ceramic Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dom. Structural Steel, Montreal, Que Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Dom. Textile, Montreal, Que United Textile Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Donahue Bros., Clermont, Que Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dosco, Cdn. Bridge, Walkerville, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dosco (Wabana Mines), Bell Island, Nfld Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dosco Fabrication Divs., Trenton, N.S Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dryden Paper, Dryden, Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Eastern Can. Stevedoring, Halifax, N.S Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Edmonton City, Alta I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Edmonton City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (clerical empl.) 

Eldorado Mining, Eldorado, Sask Mine, Mill & Smelter Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Fry-Cadbury, Montreal, Que Bakery Wkrs. (CLC) 

Garment Mfrs. Assn. Winnipeg, Man Amalgamated Clothing Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hiram Walker & Sons, Walkerville, Ont Distillery Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hospitals (11), Montreal & district, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Hotel Chateau Laurier, (C.N.R.), Ottawa, Ont... Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC) 

House of Seagrams, Que., Ont. & B.C Distillery Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Imperial Tobacco & subsidiaries, Ont. & Que Tobacco Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Kelly, Douglas, company-wide, B.C Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

Lake Asbestos of Que., Black Lake, Que Mining Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Lake Carriers' Assn., Eastern Canada Seafarers (AFL-CIO) 

Maritime Tel. & Tel. & Eastern Electric, com- 
pany-wide I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO) (plant empl.) 

Montreal Cottons, Valleyfield, Que United Textile Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Motor Transport Labour Relations Council, B.C. Teamsters (Ind.) 

National Harbours Board, Montreal, Que Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Nfld. Employers' Assn., St. Johns, Nfld Longshoremen's Protective Union (Ind.) 

Normetal Mining, Normetal, Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Northern Electric, Belleville, Ont. & Montreal, 

Que Empl. Assn. (Ind.) (plant empl.) 

Northern Electric, Montreal, Que Office Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

North York Township, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Ottawa City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) 

Ottawa Civic Hospital, Ottawa, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) 

Ottawa Transportation Commission, Ont Street Railway Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Phillips Electrical, Brockville, Ont I.U.E. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Quemont Mining, Noranda, Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Regina General Hospital, Regina, Sask Public Empl. (CLC) 

Rio Algom Mines, (Milliken Mine), Elliot Lake, 

Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Rio Algom Mines, (Nordic Mine), Algoma 

Mills, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Rowntree Co., Toronto, Ont Retail, Wholesale Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Que Bldg. Service Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Scarborough Township, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Stelco, Montreal, Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto Electric Commissioners, Ont Public Service Empl. (CLC) 

Vancouver City, B.C Civic Empl. (Ind.) (outside empl.) 

Vancouver City, B.C Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

Victoria Hospital, London, Ont Building Service Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Conciliation Officer 

Avro & Orenda Engines, Malton, Ont Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) (plant empl.) 

B.C. Electric, company-wide I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 27 



Company and Location Union 

C.B.C., Company-wide Moving Picture Machine Operators 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cockshutt Farm Equip., Brantford, Ont Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Consolidated Paper, Les Escoumins, Que Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Consolidated Paper, Ste-Anne de Portneuf, Que. Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Cyanamid of Canada, Welland, Ont Chemical Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion Stores, Toronto, Hamilton & other 

locations, Ont Retail, Wholesale Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dom. Textile, Montmorency, Sherbrooke, Magog 

& Drummondville, Que Textile Federation (CNTU) 

Massey-Ferguson, Toronto, Brantford & Wood- 
stock, Ont Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Motor Trans. Ind. Relations Bureau, Ont Teamsters (Ind.) (drivers) 

Motor Trans. Ind. Relations Bureau, Ont Teamsters (Ind.) (mechanics) 

Northern Electric, Toronto, Ont Communications Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Que. Natural Gas, company-wide Chemical Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Safeway, Shop-Easy & others, Victoria, Van- 
couver & New Westminster, B.C Butcher Workmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

T.CA., company-wide Air Line Pilots (Ind.) 

Towboat Owners' Assn., B.C Merchant Service Guild (CLC) 

Conciliation Board 

Algoma Ore Properties, Wawa, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Campbell Chibougamau Mines, Chibougamau, 

Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Chrysler Corporation, Windsor, Ont Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

C.N.R., system-wide Locomotive Engineers (Ind.) 

C.N.R., system-wide Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen 

(AFL-CIO/CLC) 

C.N.R., system-wide Trainmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

C.P.R., system-wide Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen 

C.P.R., system-wide Trainmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Consolidated Paper, Cap de la Madeleine & 

Three Rivers, Que Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Consolidated Paper, Shawinigan, Que Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Ford of Canada, Windsor, Oakville, & North 

York, Ont Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Ontario Hydro, company-wide Public Service Empl. (CLC) 

Smith Transport, Kingsway Transport & others, 

Ont. & Que Teamsters (Ind.) 

Stelco (Canada Works), Hamilton, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Stelco (Hamilton Works), Hamilton, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Union composing rooms, Toronto, Ont Typographical Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Post-Conciliation Bargaining 

C.P.R., system-wide Locomotive Engineers (Ind.) 

Noranda Mines, Noranda, Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Arbitration 

Hotel Dieu, St. Vallier & Chicoutimi, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Work Stoppage 

Hotel Royal York (CPR), Toronto, Ont Hotel Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Motor Trans. Ind. Relations Bureau, (car car- 
riers), Ont Teamsters (Ind.) 

Part III— Settlements Reached During December 1961 

(A summary of major terms on the basis of information immediately available. Figures for 
the number of employees covered are approximate.) 

Algoma Steel, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. — Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC): 3-yr. agree- 
ment covering 6,000 empl. — 4i0 an hr. wage increase retroactive to Aug. 1, 1961 plus an addi- 
tional increase of 50 an hr. eff. Aug. 1, 1963; incremental increase between job classifications of 
i0 an hr. eff. Aug. 1, 1962, raising increment to 6i0; new pension agreement eff. Jan. 1, 1962 to 
July 31, 1966, which will increase pensions to $3.15 a mo. per. yr. of service (formerly $3) up 
to a maximum of 40 yrs. and lower the retirement age from 68 to 65 yrs., with compulsory 
retirement age remaining at 68; $15 monthly deductions from pensions of retirees over 70 will 
cease for those retiring after Jan. 1, 1962; group life insurance coverage to be increased to 
$5,000 after Jan. 1, 1963; company will make contributions for participants in new union- 
sponsored Health Centre; new labour rate after Aug. 1, 1963 will be $2.1 H an hr. 

Canada Cement, N.B., Que., Ont., Man. & Alta.— Cement Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC): 
2-yr. agreement covering 1,600 empl. — wage increase of 50 an hr. retroactive to Aug. 1, 1961 and 
an additional increase of 50 an hr. eff. July 1, 1962; company will contribute 40 per hr. to 
S.U.B. plan starting July 1, 1962; uniform insurance plan for all plants to be adopted in place 
of separate plans; after July 1, 1962, labourer's rate will be $2.01. 

Crane Limited, Montreal, Que. — Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) : 2-yr. agreement covering 
1,000 empl. — 40 an hr. wage increase retroactive to Nov. 1, 1961 for St. Patrick St. plant, 40 

28 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



an hr. wage increase eff. Dec. 20, 1961 at Warden King plant plus $10 settlement pay; further 40 
an hr. increase at both plants eff. anniversary date of agreement; labourers' rates at the end of 
the agreement will be $1.80 and $1.86. 

General Motors & subsidiaries, Oshawa, Windsor, St. Catharines, Scarborough & 
London, Ont. — Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) : 3-yr. agreement covering 16,000 empl.— $10 
settlement pay; annual improvement factor wage increases (greater of 60 or 2i%) eff. Dec. 12, 
1961, Nov 5, 1962, Nov. 4, 1963; cost-of-living allowance continued; however, 20 of wage increase 
due Dec. 12, 1961 and 10 of cost-of-living allowance due Oct. 15, 1961 will be applied to 
welfare costs; non-contributory pension plan improved so that empl. retiring on or after 
Nov. 1, 1961 will receive $2.80 per mo. per yr. of service (formerly $2.50) plus a new 
supplementary benefit until age 70 of $1.80 per mo. per yr. of credited service up to $55. 
eff. Mar. 1, 1962; pensioners who retired before Nov. 1, 1961 will receive an additional 
supplementary benefit of 250 per mo. per yr. of credited service; fully-paid hospital and medical 
coverage (company paid 50% previously), with laid-off employees to receive 1 mo. fully-paid 
coverage for each 4 wks. on S.U.B.; company will pay half the cost of hospital and medical 
coverage for pensioners; fully-paid group life, accident & sickness insurance provided with 
higher benefits — life insurance increased by $500, extra accident insurance by $250, continued life 
insurance after age 65 by $75-$ 150 according to length of service; life insurance for empl. on 
layoff or non-disability leave extended from 5 to 12 mos. on a contributory basis; weekly S.U. 
Benefit increased to 62% of bef ore-tax pay plus $1.50 for each dependant up to 4 dependants 
(formerly 65% of after-tax straight-time pay); maximum weekly S.U. Benefits increased from 
$30 to $40 and maximum benefit period increased from 39 wks. to 52 wks; separation pay 
increased by 25%; new short week benefit instituted; new relocation allowance adopted; jury 
duty pay increased from $5 per day to a minimum of $10 per day for a maximum of 60 work- 
ing days (previously 14 working days) in a calendar yr.; vacation eligibility reduced from 1,400 
to 1,040 hrs. 

Hamilton Cotton & subsidiaries, Hamilton, Dundas & Trenton, Ont. — Textile Wkrs. 
Union (AFL-CIO/CLC): 29-mo. agreement covering 780 empl. — 20 an hr. wage increases eff. 
Jan. 1, 1962, Jan. 1, 1963, Oct. 1, 1963; company will pay PSI Blue Plan premiums July 13, 
1962; new labourer's rate after Oct. 1, 1963 will be $1.17. 

Hamilton General Hospitals, Hamilton, Ont. — Public Empl. (CLC): 3-yr. agreement 
covering 1,300 empl.— increases of $2.50 per wk. eff. Jan. 28, 1961, Feb. 3, 1962 & $1.50 per wk. 
eff. Feb. 2, 1963; 3 wks. vacation after 12 yrs. of service for non-shift wkrs. (formerly after 15 
yrs.); rates for ward aids, housekeeping maids and dietary maids after Feb. 2, 1963 will be 
$45.50 per wk. 

Ladies Cloak & Suit Mfrs. Assn., Winnipeg, Man. — Ladies Garment Wkrs. (AFL- 
CIO/CLC); 3-yr. agreement covering 800 empl. — cost-of-living bonus increase of 7i%, raising 
the bonus to 60% (formerly 52i%) of the piecework unit price; overtime, holiday & vacation 
pay increased by calculating on average earnings (including premium pay and bonuses) over 
6-mo. period rather than on a fixed rate; establishment of a severance pay fund to which 
employers will contribute 1% of wages; the fund will accumulate for 2 yrs. and on the 3rd yr. 
of the agreement will provide severance pay in the amount of 1 wk. pay for each yr. worked if 
company ceases operation; appointment of a permanent arbitrator. 

Northwestern Utilities & Cdn. West. Natural Gas, Alta. — Empl. Benefit Assn. (Ind.) 
& Empl. Welfare Ass. (Ind.): 1-yr. agreement covering 840 empl. — wage increase of 50 per hr. 
for labourers & tradesmen, & increases of $5 to $20 per mo. for salaried empl.; 4 wks. vacation 
after 30 yrs. of service (previous maximum vacation was 3 wks. after 5 yrs.); new labourer's 
rate will be $1.71. 

Page Hersey Tubes, Welland, Ont. — U.E. (Ind.) : 2-yr. agreement covering 875 empl. — wage 
increase of 60 an hr. eff. Dec. 17, 1961, 70 an hr. eff. Nov. 1, 1962; $20 settlement pay; 4 wks. 
vacation after 24 yrs. of service (formerly 4 wks. after 25 yrs.); holiday pay increased from 
$18.50 to $19.00 the first yr., and from $19.00 to $19.50 the second yr. 

Polymer Corporation, Sarnia, Ont. — Oil Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC): 3-yr. agreement 
covering 1,600 empl. — $30 settlement pay; wage increases of 50 to 90 an hr. eff. Dec. 13, 1961, 
40 to 80 an hr. eff. Sept. 13, 1962, 50 to 80 an hr. eff. June 13, 1963; new labourer's rate will be 
$2.02 an hr. after June 13, 1963. 

Provincial Transport, Que. — Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC): 3-yr. 
agreement covering 650 empl. — increase in base rate from $9 per day to $10.75, retroactive to 
Oct. 1, 1961; further increase to $11 per day in the third yr. of the agreement; hours of work 
reduced from 13 per day to 12; contributory pension fund to be established in the third yr. of 
the contract. 

Shawinigan Power, company-wide, Que. — Empl. Assn. (Ind.): 2-yr. agreement covering 
1,300 empl. — wage increases varying from 70 to 110 per hr. retroactive to Nov. 1, 1961; wage 
reopener on Nov. 1, 1962; 3 wks. vacation after 12 yrs. of service (formerly after 15 yrs.). 

Toronto Transit Commission, Ont. — Street Railway Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) : 2-yr. agree- 
ment covering 4,300 empl. — across-the-board wage increases of 40 eff. Jan. 1, 1962, Sept. 1, 1962, 
April 1, 1963; bus driver's rate after April 1, 1963 will be $2.30 an hr. 

Trucking Assn. of Que., province-wide — Teamsters (Ind.): 3-yr. agreement covering 
30 employers and 1,100 empl. — $15 settlement pay; wage increases of 80 an hr. eff. Dec. 4, 1961, 
Oct. 1, 1962, Oct. 1, 1963; 8 paid holidays (previously 7); truck driver's rate after Oct. 1, 1963 
will be $1.82 an hr. 

Winnipeg City, Man. — Public Service Empl. (CLC) : 2-yr. agreement covering 2,700 empl. 
— 3% increase eff. April 1, 1961 with a further increase of 3% eff. April 1, 1962, but not to 
exceed $15 per mo.; shift premium increased from 70 an hr. to 80; after April 1, 1962 labourer's 
rate will be $1.76 an hr., and junior clerk's starting rate will be $192 a mo. 

Winnipeg City, Man. — Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC): 1-yr. agreement covering 530 
empl.— 3% salary increases eff. April 1, 1961 and April 1, 1962, but not to exceed $15 per mo.; 
first class fire fighter's salary after April 1, 1962 will be $431 per mo. 

Winnipeg Transit Dept., Man. — Street Railway Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) : 2-yr. agreement 
covering 1,000 empl. — 2% wage increase eff. Jan. 1, 1962; further increase of 2i% eff. Jan. 1, 
1963; bus driver's rate after Jan. 1, 1963 will be $2.23 an hr. 

TH* LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 29 



Fifth Annual Convention of the 

Ontario Federation of Labour (CLC) 

Royal York Hotel strike, Sfeelworkers' organizing campaign at Sudbury and 
Port Colborne, provincial Department of Labour's "laxity" in enforcing safety 
regulations in industry hold leading place in discussions of the 800 delegates 



The strike at the Royal York Hotel, the 
United Steel workers' campaign to supplant 
the International Union of Mine, Mill and 
Smelter Workers in Sudbury, the alleged 
shortcomings of the provincial Department 
of Labour in connection with industrial 
accidents, and the Federation's stand with 
regard to the New Democratic Party were 
the leading questions brought before the 
Ontario Federation of Labour (CLC) at its 
fifth annual convention, held in Windsor on 
November 6 to 8. 

A proposal to raise the Federation's per 
capita tax from 3 cents to 5 cents per mem- 
ber per month was approved by an over- 
whelming majority of the 800 delegates who 
attended the convention. 

The discussion of the Royal York strike 
was led by A. R. Johnstone, Canadian Vice- 
President of the Hotel and Restaurant 
Employees' and Bartenders' International 
Union, who asserted that the CPR had 
forced the strike on the employees by mak- 
ing a wage offer that no self-respecting 
union could accept. 

Concerned by the recent decision of 
Magistrate Thomas Elmore upholding the 
CPR's dismissal of 700 Royal York strikers 
and stating that the Ontario Labour Rela- 
tions Act did not guarantee a right to strike 
(L.G., Dec. 1961, p. 1277), the delegates 
demanded immediate passage by the Ontario 
Government of an employees' bill of rights 
to protect the jobs of strikers. 

The convention also demanded immediate 
revision of the Ontario Labour Relations 
Act to outlaw the use of strikebreakers. 

Murray Cotterill, public relations director 
of the United Steelworkers, said that the 
proposed bill of rights should clearly estab- 
lish the right to strike and the right of 
employees to organize in a union of their 
own choice, free from interference, dis- 
crimination or intimidation by employers. 

The delegates also passed resolutions sug- 
gesting a national boycott of all CPR ser- 
vices, and urging that every effort be made 
to induce more unions to refuse to provide 
service to the Royal York. It was further 
decided that unions affiliated with the OFL 
should ask the public and any agencies that 



receive aid from labour, such as churches, 
service clubs and fraternities, to take a 
"neutral" position "by refusing to enter the 
hotel for the purpose of receiving service 
from the strikebreakers." 

A resolution was proposed by Windsor 
Local 444 of the United Automobile 
Workers that would have condemned as "an 
act of union cannibalism" the campaign by 
the United Steelworkers to wrest bargaining 
rights for the employees of the International 
Nickel Co. and Falconbridge Nickel Mines 
from the Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, 
and called on the Steelworkers and Claude 
Jodoin, President of the Canadian Labour 
Congress, to stop "raiding" Mine-Mill locals 
in Sudbury and Port Calborne*. Many 
UAW delegates declared that the resolu- 
tion did not express the views of the 
majority of members of the union, and only 
15 of the convention delegates supported 
it. 

The Federation then went on to pass a 
resolution pledging its full support to the 
Steelworkers in their efforts to win bar- 
baining rights for employees of Interna- 
tional Nickel Co. and Falconbridge Nickel 
Mines. Only four delegates opposed this 
resolution when it was put to the vote. 

The condemnation of the CLC President 
contained in the first resolution brought Mr. 
Jodoin himself into the debate in an 
unprecedented appearance as a speaker on 
the floor of the convention. He described 
Local 444 and its president, Charles 
Brooks, as friends of Communism, and he 
offered to start a collection to send "these 
people who are inclined to love that system 
.... on their way there so that they can 
enjoy it to the fullest extent." Mr. Jodoin's 
speech was wildly applauded by the 
delegates. 

Mr. Brooks said that it was "the height 
of double-dealing to expel a union and 
then to raid its membership." 

*In a certification vote in early December among 
employees at the Port Colborne refinery, the Steel- 
workers received 1,033 votes and Mine-Mill, 763. 






THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



Industrial Safety 

Douglas Hamilton, Secretary-Treasurer of 
the Federation, urged a complete shakeup 
of the Ontario Department of Labour. He 
especially complained of the Department's 
laxity in enforcing safety measures in 
industry, accusing it of having abdicated its 
responsibility for accident prevention and in- 
dustrial safety to others "who sit in ivory 
towers and spend a million dollars a year 
issuing safety posters." 

Mr. Hamilton said that the Federation's 
recommendations on safety sent to govern- 
ment leaders in 1958 had been forgotten or 
ignored. Accidents continued to occur 
because the suggested precautions were not 
taken. Referring to the Hogs Hollow accident 
in Toronto in which five labourers were 
killed when a tunnel collapsed, he said that 
it took an exposure by Toronto newspapers 
to bring about the establishment of a Royal 
Commission on industrial safety. The dele- 
gates passed overwhelmingly a resolution 
calling upon the Ontario Government to 
implement the recommendations of the 
Royal Commission (L.G., Dec. 1961, p. 
1238). 

Action to prevent what it termed "ex- 
ploitation" of migrant farm workers was 
urged by the convention. It asked the 
Ontario Government to license all persons 
who act as contractors for migrant agricul- 
tural workers, and to set minimum rates of 
pay and proper standards of food and 
shelter and maximum transportation charges 
for agricultural employees who are 
obliged to pay their own fares.* 

A special committee on agricultural 
workers recommended that the Dominion- 
Provincial farm labour committee should 
develop a method of contracting through 
the National Employment Service whenever 
it is necessary for the farm labour com- 
mittee to provide help, or to subsidize the 
movement of agricultural workers. 

It suggested that until agricultural workers 
are brought under the Workmen's Com- 
pensation Act, contractors or direct-hiring 
farmers be required to provide alternative 
insurance to compensate for medical costs 
and loss of income due to accidents during 
work or in transport to and from work. 

*A bill to amend the Masters and Servants Act to 
provide workers further protection against being 
defrauded of their wages was given first reading in 
the Ontario Legislature on November 28, second 
reading on December 4. It is aimed primarily at 
contractors of itinerant tobacco harvest labour. 



The convention also approved a proposal 
that the Federation invite the Ontario flue- 
cured tobacco growers, other farm groups 
and local chambers of commerce to join the 
Federation and local labour councils in 
investigating the problem and in submitting 
joint proposals to the Government. 

Political Aims 

The delegates overwhelmingly endorsed 
a resolution that set out the political aims 
of the Federation. The resolution urged 
local unions and labour councils, in co- 
operation with other peoples and groups, to 
help in building an effective political 
organization. It called on affiliates to do 
everything possible to make the political 
program effective, and in particular it 
urged all unions to "take steps to affiliate 
with the New Democratic Party and 
encourage their members to participate fully 
in the political life of their communities." 

There were signs of dissatisfaction among 
the delegates concerning the obstacles to 
political affiliation with the new party pre- 
sented by the constitutions of some unions. 
Some delegates indicated that they were 
prepared to defy or circumvent constitu- 
tional provisions that forbid direct political 
action by their unions. 

President Archer emphasized the point that 
no attempt was being made to compel 
union members to support the new party, 
and he pointed out that the party's con- 
stitution forbade any affiliate to force a 
member to support the party. 

Per Capita Tax 

The increase in the per capita tax was 
said by Secretary-Treasurer Hamilton to be 
necessary to meet demands for increased 
service by local unions and steadily rising 
costs of operating the Federation. He also 
pointed out that the OFL had suffered fin- 
ancially through the expulsion by the CLC 
of the Teamsters and the Seafarers and the 
suspension of the Lithographers. 

The Federation was faced with a deficit 
of $11,172 in its 1960 operations, he 
reported. The tax increase is expected to 
add $60,000 to its revenues. 

Other Resolutions 

The proposal to change from an annual 
to a biennial convention was again brought 
up but was defeated when it failed to obtain 
the necessary two-thirds majority: 304 
delegates were in favour and 246 were 
opposed. To give the majority required to 
change the constitution, 366 votes in 
favour would have been necessary. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



31 



The Federation renewed its demands for 
a minimum wage of $1.25 an hour for both 
men and women in all industries. 

Among the rest of the 70 resolutions 
dealt with were those that called on the 
Ontario Government to expand its aid to 
students to ensure that all those qualified are 
able to attend university, technological in- 
stitutes and other institutions of advanced 
education; and to establish a comprehensive 
provincial scheme of health insurance and 
a portable pension plan. 

Legislation to prohibit discrimination in 
employment or dismissals on the ground of 
age was urged by the convention, with the 
qualification that, regarding termination of 



employment, any prohibition should be 
modified if pension arrangements exist. 

Elections 

David Archer was unanimously re-elected 
President, and Douglas Hamilton re- 
elected Secretary-Treasurer when he 
defeated Victor White, former President of 
Windsor Local 200, UAW, by 487 votes to 
127. Both officers thus begin their seventh 
term of office. 

The following were re-elected Vice- 
Presidents: Michael Fenwick, George 
Barlow, George Watson, William Booth- 
royd, Purdy Churchill, William Punnett, 
Sam Hughes, Richard Courtney, Edward 
Liness and Hugh Doherty. 



Special Convention of the 

Confederation of National Trade Unions 

Makes important changes in structure of the organization, denounces present 
unemployment, and makes careful study of Pope's latest encyclical, "Mater et 
Magistra." Convention marks the 40th anniversary of federation's founding 



At a special convention of the Confedera- 
tion of National Trade Unions held in 
Quebec from September 17 to 23, important 
changes were made in the structure of the 
organization. The present unemployment 
situation in Canada was denounced. 

The convention, which marked the 40th 
anniversary of the Confederation, founded 
in Hull in 1921 under the name Canadian 
and Catholic Confederation of Labour, was 
also the occasion for a careful study of the 
Pope's latest encyclical letter. 

The National President's moral report, 
which was read at the covention's opening 
dinner, also dealt with the encyclical Mater 
et Magistra. Jean Marchand, referring to 
the social thinking of the Church, stated 
that "he saw in this most recent encyclical a 
confirmation of certain points of view we 
have been upholding." 

More than 550 delegates representing 
some 260 organizations attended the con- 
vention. 

As this was a special convention, the 
agenda adopted at last year's congress had 
to be adhered to. But the delegates were 
able to adopt certain emergency resolutions, 
one of which was a protest against the 
stocking of nuclear war-heads on Canadian 
soil. 

A move was also made toward a better 
understanding with the Quebec Federation 



of Labour (CLC) when it was suggested 
that a joint ethics committee be established 
to solve the problems of union jurisdiction. 

The bulk of the work, however, was 
expended on problems of internal adminis- 
tration. Various measures were adopted with 
a view to creating greater unity within the 
CNTU while leaving more initiative to the 
members. Among the concrete steps taken, 
it was decided to fuse the 15 present federa- 
tions into six new ones and to establish 
regional offices in every part of the province. 

The Executive Board was unanimously 
re-elected. 

40th Anniversary of the CNTU 

The National President of the CNTU 
declared at the dinner that marked the 
organization's 40th anniversary that the 
most important achievement of the CNTU 
in the past 40 years was to have trade 
unionism accepted by the workers and the 
people of Quebec province. 

"The principles that guided our move- 
ment and the reasons for its creation," Mr. 
Marchand explained, "permitted it to enter 
into the scheme of things without the oppo- 
sition met by other groups. This has enabled 
a large number of workers to unionize and 
enjoy the benefits of collective action." 



32 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



Back in 1921, the year the Canadian and 
Catholic Confederation of Labour was 
founded, Mr. Marchand said, the population 
of the province of Quebec was much more 
homogeneous and to contemplate a trade 
union movement that would find support 
exclusively among Catholic French Cana- 
dians was feasible. 

Changes in population, urbanization, the 
need for union solidarity, changes in the 
industrial structures, and new legislation 
have all made it imperative for the CNTU 
to re-examine its policies and adjust itself 
to the new conditions. It was not a question 
of betraying the past. On the contrary, the 
finest tribute that can be paid to the past 
is to do what is needed to maintain the 
vitality and ensure the development of the 
heritage we have received, he said. 

The President recalled that since last 
year, the CNTU is no longer a denomina- 
tional organization, although its actions are 
still inspired by Christian principles. 

Analysing the new trend of the federa- 
tion, he said the CNTU: 

— Wishes to extend its activities the length 
and breadth of Canada; 

— Believes Canadians want an authentic 
Canadian trade union organization; 

— Is opposed to discrimination for rea- 
sons of language, race, religion and sex; 

— Believes in democracy and is convinced 
that it provides a fine example to all in 
this respect; 

— Deplores the depersonalization of the 
workers and the dehumanization of labour 
in big business and is deeply concerned to 
find a parallel phenomenon occurring in 
oversized unions; 

— Believes in the need for world-wide 
trade union activity and intends to par- 
ticipate more and more in it; 

— Believes in the spiritual values of man 
and will not admit that they be ignored in 
the building of a better world; 

— Recognizes the saving virtues of cul- 
ture and education; 

— Believes in the possibility of achieving 
peace and condemns any form of war as 
a means of settling international differences. 
It is especially opposed to the use of nuclear 
arms. 

Hon. Rene Hamel 

Hon. Rene Hamel, Provincial Minister of 
Labour, said that "if our democratic and 
free enterprise system cannot soon find a 
better solution to the problem of unem- 
ployment, it runs the risk of disappearing 
before the rise of other economic theories." 

Mr. Hamel, who is also Minister of 
Municipal Affairs, pointed out that Quebec 




The Confederation of National Trade 
Unions has adopted a new crest to replace 
that of the Canadian and Catholic Con- 
federation of Labour. 

The new crest, which bears only the 
French and English abbreviations of the 
organization's name, is composed of a dou- 
ble circle surrounding three chain links 
symbolizing solidarity and unity. The field 
is golden yellow, symbolizing strength, and 
the grey colour of the chain links symbolizes 
peace. 



accepts its responsibilities in the matter of 
unemployment and has already taken a 
number of steps to remedy it. 

He mentioned specifically the establish- 
ment of the Economic Guidance Council, 
the establishment of Industrial Boards in 
various parts of the province, participation 
in the winter works program, and the reform 
of the educational system. 

The Minister said that in 1958-59, the 
winter works program entailed 230 projects 
in 71 municipalities at a cost of $16,844,- 
475.11; in the winter of 1960-61, it involved 
2,145 projects in 765 municipalities at a 
cost of $90,696,000. The number of work- 
ers involved increased from 6,532 to 49,427. 

Hon. Rene Levesque 

Hon. Rene Levesque, Provincial Minister 
of Natural Resources, stressed the need for 
training technicians and skilled workers. He 
deplored the fact that many firms em- 
ploying graduate technicians must train 
them as apprentices when they do employ 
them. 

Speaking on the problem of unemploy- 
ment and the solutions it calls for, he said 
that for years the economy of the country 
had been expanding at the annual rate of 
1 or 2 per cent while the labour force had 
been increasing faster. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

52905-7—3 



• JANUARY 1962 



The Minister said that "the solution of 
unemployment lies in creating new occupa- 
tions and in giving our youth and workers 
the means to fill these new occupations that 
will require greater skill." 

Mr. Levesque stated that the high rate 
of unemployment in Quebec was "shameful 
and scandalous" and added that if private 
enterprise cannot solve this problem, "the 
State will then have to take a hand in it. 

"If Canada cannot change such a situa- 
tion," he said, "the economic and social 
system will fail, and socialism and any other 
such doctrine will gain ground." 

Mr. Levesque also stressed the part that 
enlightened citizens, and especially unions, 
can play, through their demands and pres- 
sure, in making politicians keep their 
promises and follow policies in line with 
public welfare. 

Other Speakers 

Theogene Ricard, MP 

Theogene Ricard, Member of Parliament 
for St. Hyacinthe, who represented the 
federal Minister of Labour, spoke on tech- 
nical and professional training in Canada 
and explained the nature and scope of the 
federal contribution to training. 

Mr. Ricard stated that from now until 
1966, the number of technical and profes- 
sional facilities will have to be at least 
doubled. He described the provisions of the 
new Technical and Vocational Training 
Assistance Act (L.G., Nov., p. 1096) for 
federal sharing of the costs of new training 
facilities; of training apprentices, supervisors 
in industry, and disabled persons; of pro- 
viding post-secondary school training for 
persons wishing to become technicians; and 
for sharing the costs of providing a voca- 
tional training program for unemployed 
persons. 

Other Speakers 

Jean-Baptiste Lemoine, President of the 
Catholic Union of Farmers, Forestry Serv- 
ice, pointed out the increasingly industrial 
nature of the province of Quebec. "Even 
though," he said, "the number of farmers 
has decreased by a third during the last 20 
years, we are now able to produce twice 
as much as before." 

L. P. Bonneau, Vice-Rector of Laval 
University, recalled that an imposing num- 
ber of Laval graduates are active in trade 
unionism. He also pointed out that the 
University had recently entered into a col- 
lective agreement with its employees and 
had undertaken a program of job evalua- 
tion. 

Msgr. Ernest Lemieux, parish priest for 
Beauport, who represented the Archbishop 



of Quebec, pointed out the excellent work 
accomplished by the CNTU on behalf of 
the working classes in the province. 

President's Moral Report 

CNTU President Jean Marchand based 
his moral report on the Pope's encyclical 
Mater et Magistra, because in the coinciding 
of the 40th anniversary of the founding of 
the CNTU and the 70th anniversary of 
the encyclical Rerum Novarum he found an 
excellent occasion to re-affirm the basic 
principles of trade unionism. 

The National President first said that 
the CNTU was especially pleased to find in 
the recent encyclical of Pope John XXIII 
"the confirmation of many of the views we 
have been advocating and which should 
protect us, at least for a while, from the 
attacks of social conservatives." 

Mr. Marchand stated that, under the 
term "socialization," the encyclical intro- 
duces a new concept. The term is defined 
as "the progressive multiplication of rela- 
tions in common life." 

This socialization guarantees certain in- 
dividual rights in the social and economic 
field, he said, adding: 

Thus it is wrong to pretend that the Church 
is opposed to social security and to government 
intervention in fields which had been tradi- 
tionally reserved to private initiative. It looks 
favourably upon this socialization provided 
that all necessary precautions are taken in its 
implementation in order to avoid the crushing 
of individuals and intermediate groups. We 
must endeavour to draw out of it all the 
advantages, while averting and restricting its 
negative aspects. 

Mr. Marchand recalled that the CNTU 
had always maintained that workers were 
entitled not only to a living wage but also 
to partake in the prosperity of the enter- 
prise and of the national community. He 
specified that the principle was strongly 
supported by the encyclical, which says 
that "the remuneration of work cannot be 
left entirely to the laws of the market nor 
can it be fixed arbitrarily. It is determined 
according to justice and equity." 

Mr. Marchand also quoted this passage: 

We must here call attention to the fact that 
in many economies today, the medium and 
large enterprises not rarely effect rapid and 
large productive developments by means of 
self-financing. In such cases, we hold that the 
workers should acquire shares in the firms in 
which they are engaged, especially when they 
earn no more than the minimum salary. 

Mr. Marchand added: "It is my con- 
viction that, on this matter, workers have 
been shamelessly deprived of their right 
and would be justified in claiming their due 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



from a vast number of enterprises which 
usurped profits that ought to have been 
shared." 

Referring to the structures of North 
American enterprises, the National President 
qualified them as "anti-Christian." 

He pointed out that "not only has nothing 
been done to make a human community 
out of enterprise, but we have striven to 
erect air-tight partitions between manage- 
ment and employees." 

He recalled that Pope John points out 
that one of the most desirable means of 
responding to the needs of justice "is to 
make sure that workers share in the owner- 
ship of the enterprises in the manner and 
the degree most suitable to all." 

Mr. Marchand also relied on the encycli- 
cal to stress that the voice of the workers 
be heard and listened to at every level. 

Referring once more to the phenomenon 
of "socialization," Mr. Marchand stated 
that Pope John suggests that "the State 
intervene in numerous fields" and he pro- 
poses the expansion of the part the State 
can play in relation to private sectors. 

Mr. Marchand said that "whenever it 
would be impossible or whenever private 
enterprise would refuse to assume its respon- 
sibilities, there is no doubt that the State 
would have to intervene directly to safe- 
guard public interest. He relied on this 
passage of the encyclical: 

Those in authority, who are responsible for 
the common good, cannot help but feel the 
need not only to exercise in the field of 
economics a multiform action, at once more 
vast, more profound and more organic, but 
it is also required to this end that they give 
themselves suitable structures, tasks, means 
and methods. 

Mr. Marchand said in closing that Mater 
et Magistra is a reliable source of inspira- 
tion and is broad enough to give scope and 
depth to union activities. 

He said that "we will have to tackle the 
structure and even the concept of industry, 
which will have to be transformed as 
quickly as possible into a "community of 
persons." 

The General Chaplain 

Msgr. Henri Pichette, CNTU General 
Chaplain, stated that "when John XXIII 
calls for trade unions to play a larger part 
in our society, he expresses his trust in 
union leaders and stresses the great impor- 
tance of the contribution they can make." 

He found in this attitude a call to union 
leaders to come to some concrete action 
and to do everything possible to give full 
effect to Christian social doctrine. 



He said this immense task can be accom- 
plished only by working together and added : 

If individuals must be conscious of their 
duties, they must also realize that they cannot 
fulfil them alone. Our society can be restored 
only through collective responsibility. You feel 
the need to get together, to appoint committees 
to plan your collective agreements, to draw up 
the strategy of your negotiations and work out 
programs. You must adopt the same means to 
study thoroughly together the Pope's message 
and try and find where it applies in your fields 
of action. 

Msgr. Pichette stated that our society will 
have a human and Christian aspect when 
the responsible laymen in the economic, 
social and political sectors combine their 
scientific and technical skill with the knowl- 
edge of Christian principles. 

Changing the CNTU Structure 

The convention spent more than two 
days studying the problem of changing the 
structure of the organization, a problem 
made more difficult by the desire of the 
CNTU to better centralize its services in 
order to make them more efficient while 
keeping them as close as possible to the 
member. 

The Executive Board had in mind some 
centralization of the services and, on the 
other hand, the complete and total integra- 
tion of the member in the movement. "In 
order to achieve this," the Board said, "we 
feel that the strengthening of the power 
of the CNTU must be carried out by assur- 
ing more services to its members, but that 
such services should be provided at the 
level closest to the member." 

The Board also stressed the need for 
the unions to remain autonomous and 
masters of their own decisions. It has been 
deemed far from desirable for unions to 
be entities without any legal responsibility 
but merely dependent upon the central 
organization. 

The first change approved by the con- 
vention provides for the establishment of 
regional offices throughout the province. 
These offices will, henceforth, take care 
of the organizational and educational serv- 
ices previously provided by the central 
councils. Agreements to this effect are to 
be signed with the councils between now 
and September 1962. 

The central councils will continue to 
represent the workers in their jurisdiction 
at the school, municipal and public organi- 
zation levels. As the functions of the central 
councils will then be fewer, it is expected 
that their share of the per capita tax will 
be smaller. 

The permanent staff of the regional 
offices will be hired by the CNTU after 
consultation and agreement with the central 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

52905-7— 3J 



• JANUARY 1962 



35 



councils and will come under the direction 
of the Executive Board of the central 
councils. 

The second important change relates to 
the federations. The convention decided to 
amalgamate the 15 existing federations into 
six new ones in order to create units that 
will be larger and more able to give the 
unions all the help required. It will take 
some time to complete this change. 

The six new federations are: 

— Federation of building, wood and fur- 
niture workers; 

— Federation of metal, chemical products 
and mine workers; 

— Federation of textile, clothing, leather 
and shoe workers; 

— Federation of pulp, wood, paper, print- 
ing and editing, cardboard box and paper 
products workers; 

— Federation of municipal corporations 
and school boards, hospital and public 
services employees; 

— Federation of trade, office and services 
employees and barbers and hairdressers. 

The federations will continue on their 
existing basis and will make decisions of a 
professional nature. However, they will be 
able to enter into agreements with the 
CNTU in order that the latter may provide 
negotiation and collective agreement imple- 
menting services. The federations will then 
have to refund the most of these services to 
the CNTU. 

The convention has also adopted a num- 
ber of regulations that will make dis- 
affiliation more difficult for a union, a 
central council or a federation. It also 
adopted a regulation providing for a bet- 
ter application of democratic principles 
within the unions. 

The regulations provide that the calling 
of union meetings is compulsory and that 
meetings must be called and in such a way 
that all members will know when and 
where they are to be held. 

Unemployment 

The convention spent a whole day, in- 
cluding the evening session, studying the 
unemployment problem. As a result of 
this study the CNTU recommended: 

— Undertaking a campaign to alert public 
opinion at all levels; 

— Carrying out an investigation of the 
shoe industry by the Province of Quebec 
Council for Economic Guidance; 

— State control of banking and credit; 

— Establishing an investment bank; 

— Greater use of the Bank of Canada in 
financing public works; 



— Extending the Unemployment Insur- 
ance Act to all the workers of the country. 

A 28-page document prepared by its 
permanent committee on unemployment 
and employment under the chairmanship 
of Michel Chartrand was read to the con- 
vention and served as a basis for the dis- 
cussions. 

A former president of the CNTU Gerard 
Picard, who is now president of both the 
Montreal Central Council and the Printing 
and Editing Federation, denounced the 
capitalistic system as being the basic cause 
of unemployment in Canada. "A full 
employment policy in a capitalistic regime 
is in opposition to the equilibrium existing 
between the present society and those who 
hold the purse strings." 

Mr. Picard stressed the need "for the 
workers to become once more human" and 
protested against the accumulation of over- 
time by those who are working while too 
many of their fellow workers are 
unemployed. 

The President of the Textile Federation, 
Rene Gosselin, suggested that the 35-hour 
work week be adopted to redistribute the 
work among a greater number of workers. 

He also stressed the need for State inter- 
vention because private enterprise cannot 
be counted on to find remedies to 
unemployment. 

The National Secretary of the CNTU 
spoke at length as a member of the Na- 
tional Productivity Council. Marcel Pepin 
said the Council's terms of reference were 
so limited that it was impossible for it 
to arrive at some solutions. He suggested 
that the Council become a subcommittee of 
a national body on economic guidance. 

Mr. Pepin suggested two measures under 
the Unemployment Insurance Act: raise the 
benefits and pay them during the whole 
period of unemployment. 

Raymond Parent of the Metal Workers' 
Federation, pointing out that, in the last 
decade, productivity in this sector had risen 
rapidly and that wages were also higher, 
but to a much less degree, and that the 
labour force had decreased slightly, said 
the 40-hour week was indeed a fact and 
that the Confederation's demands in this 
respect are long overdue. 

Adrien Plourde, President of the Metal 
Workers' Federation, suggested that public 
opinion be alerted by every means of 
propaganda available to the CNTU. "We 
must make public demonstrations and organ- 
ize public meetings to cry out that we will 
no longer tolerate a high level of unem- 
ployment", he said. 



36 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



Rev. Jean-Marie Lafontaine, chaplain of 
a Montreal union, said we have too long 
been suspicious of State intervention and 
that we have been influenced too much by 
what has taken place in some countries 
where freedom has been stifled. The State 
has more reason to intervene at the eco- 
nomic level since it has more means avail- 
able for intervening in favour of the 
distressed, said the Chaplain. 

Pointing out that the workers with jobs 
are more prosperous today than ever, Father 
Lafontaine stressed the importance of union 
members' giving some attention to the plight 
of the unemployed. 

Another delegate, Napoleon Nadeau, de- 
nounced workers who seek time and a half 
and double time to the prejudice of their 
fellow workers who are unemployed. He 
was also opposed to Sunday work and sug- 
gested creating a labour association in the 
province to do away with it. 

During the discussion, the convention also 
adopted a resolution calling for an amend- 
ment to the Unemployment Insurance Act 
"to enable an individual employer in con- 
struction to provide unemployment insur- 
ance stamps to the workers in his service". 

Joint Committee on Ethics 

Through its President, the CNTU pro- 
posed to the Quebec Federation of Labour 
(CLC) and to the Canadian Labour Con- 
gress the creation of a joint committee on 
ethics to study the problems of union juris- 
diction in order to do away with union 
raiding. 

Such a committee would study all cases 
of conflict between unions of various 
allegiances and make recommendations to 
the parties concerned. (QFL President 
Roger Provost later welcomed the sug- 
gestion.) 

The idea was initiated by Mr. Marchand 
when commenting on reactions to his state- 
ment at the opening of the convention that 
he wished to expand CNTU activities across 
the whole country. 

Mr. Marchand explained: 

"I have been asked if the wish expressed 
in my report to extend CNTU activities on 
a nation-wide basis could be interpreted as 
a challenge to the Canadian Labour Con- 
gress and a declaration of war against inter- 
national unions. This was surely not my 
intention. I said that the CNTU must be 
expanded 'according to the most appropriate 
and most efficient formula,' that is to say, 
affiliation to the CLC or the achievement 
of labour unity according to any other 
means agreed upon by the parties could 
very well be that 'most appropriate formula'. 



Mass union raiding does not seem to me 
any more possible than it is desirable for 
either party." 

Mr. Marchand recalled, however, that the 
CNTU has always maintained that "workers 
should remain free to change unions if they 
deem it advisable." 

He said that "the advantages of an 
absolute union monpoly do not compensate 
for the gains that result from the free exer- 
cise of the right to union membership". 

Increase in Hospital Fees 

The CNTU flatly rejected the charge that 
hospital employees who insist on higher 
wages are responsible for the increase in 
hospital fees. 

In a statement given to the press during 
the convention, the National President de- 
clared that the CNTU will not admit that 
the Department of Health should intervene 
in bona fide negotiations between free unions 
and the hospitals or that it refuse to accept 
the findings of arbitration boards. 

Mr. Marchand stated that while the Que- 
bec Government must have some control 
over hospital budgets, since it will finally 
have to pay most of the cost, this control 
must not destroy free collective bargaining. 

Mr. Marchand thought the increase in 
hospital fees came from many factors, of 
which the most important are: the adjust- 
ment of the wages paid to the nuns; the 
creation of thousands of new jobs; the salary 
increases to management staff; the increase 
in medical staff; the purchase of new equip- 
ment, and the salary increases to non-union 
staff. 

"We must point out", he said, "that it 
is the hospital employees on the lower rungs 
who most of all deserve public sympathy. 
They do not come under the Workmen's 
Compensation Act nor under the Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Act and yet for years they 
have indirectly subsidized most of our hos- 
pitals through lower wages and inferior 
working conditions." 

Nuclear Warheads in Canada 

The convention sent a telegram to the 
Prime Minister strongly protesting against 
the storing of nuclear warheads on Cana- 
dian soil. 

Signed by Mr. Marchand, National 
President, the telegram said: 

The 550 delegates assembled in special con- 
vention in Quebec have instructed me to send 
you this message. They are strongly opposed 
to any agreement between Canada and the 
United States for the stockpiling of nuclear 
warheads on Canadian soil. The convention 
also rejects the idea that the Canadian army 
be equipped with atomic arms. The presence 
of nuclear warheads in Canada would provide 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



37 



a potential enemy of the United States with 
justification for turning Canada into a radio- 
active desolation. Both the United States and 
the U.S.S.R. claim they each have sufficient 
atomic power to destroy the world. What can 
Canada add to this abominable situation? The 
only service we can render to humanity is to 
exert all our efforts toward the banning of all 
kinds of atomic weapons. The delegates expect 
that you will resist American pressure. 

Elections 

Jean Marchand was unanimously re- 
elected President of the CNTU, a position 
he assumed last March when Roger 
Mathieu resigned. Marcel Pepin and 
Jacques Dion were re-elected Secretary and 
Treasurer respectively. 



The elections, which were conducted by 
Gerard Picard, a former president, resulted 
in new mandates for all the vice-presidents 
who stood for re-election. The only new 
member of the Board will be Martial 
Laforest, Chemical Products Workers, of 
Shawinigan, who replaces Guy Thibodeau, 
who did not stand for re-election as Fifth 
Vice-President. 

The other Vice-Presidents are: Rene Gos- 
selin, Textile Workers, Granby; S. Ted 
Payne, Metal Workers, Montreal; Eugene 
Rancourt, Shoe Workers, Quebec; Adrien 
Plourde, Aluminum Workers, Arvida; 
Daniel Lessard, Asbestos Workers, Thetford 
Mines; Henri Vachon, Paper Workers, 
Saguenay; and Miss Jeanne Duval, Hospital 
Workers, Montreal. 



4th Biennial Convention of the AFL-CIO 

Delegates approve procedure for settling of jurisdictional disputes, adopt 
strong resolution designed to enforce bars to racial discrimination within 
organization, and erect effective barrier against re-admission of Teamsters 



A procedure for the settlement of juris- 
dictional disputes and a strong resolution 
designed to enforce barriers against racial 
discrimination within the organization were 
adopted at the fourth biennial convention 
of the American Federation of Labor and 
Congress of Industrial Organizations, held 
at Bal Harbour, Fla., December 7 to 14. 

The 900 delegates erected an effective 
barrier against re-admission of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters, ex- 
pelled in 1957 on charges of corruption 
(L.G. 1957, p. 1275), when they adopted 
a resolution that requires expelled unions 
seeking re-admission to pass a test of clean 
unionism. An AFL-CIO spokesman later 
said the Teamsters couldn't meet the test 
under its present leadership. 

AFL-CIO President George Meany was 
re-elected by acclamation, as were other 
officers of the 12,500,000-member organiza- 
tion. 

A special feature of the convention was 
an address by United States President John 
Kennedy. 

Settlement of Jurisdictional Disputes 

The procedure for settling jurisdictional 
disputes provides for mediation of conflict- 
ing claims to jurisdiction, with final decision 
vested in the 29-member Executive Council, 
and establishes a system of sanctions against 
non-complying affiliates. Recourse to the 
courts is prohibited. 



The machinery for dispute settlement is 
spelled out in an amendment to the con- 
stitution. The 22 -section article provides 
that: 

— Each affiliate shall respect the estab- 
lished collective bargaining relationship of 
every other affiliate, and no affiliate shall 
organize or attempt to represent workers 
already represented by another affiliate. 

— Each affiliate shall respect the estab- 
lished work relationship of every other 
affiliate, i.e., it will not seek to obtain for 
its members work that members of another 
affiliate have "customarily" been doing. 

— No affiliate shall "circulate or cause to 
be circulated" any charge or report that 
may have the effect of bringing another 
affiliate into public disrepute. 

— If affiliates involved in or affected by 
a dispute are unable to reach a voluntary 
settlement with the assistance of a mediator 
appointed by the AFL-CIO president, they 
will have a full and fair hearing before an 
impartial umpire. 

— The impartial umpire shall make a 
determination, after a hearing, within a 
time specified by the AFL-CIO president. 

— An affiliate that thinks it has been 
adversely affected by an umpire's determina- 
tion may file an appeal with the president 
within five days after receipt of the decision, 
and the president shall refer the appeal 
to a subcommittee of the Executive Council. 

— The subcommittee may disallow the 
appeal, in which case the umpire's decision 



38 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



is final, or refer it to the full Executive 
Council. A majority of all members of the 
Council is necessary to set aside or alter 
an umpire's determination, and the Council's 
decision is final. 

A union that fails to comply with an 
award shall be subject to sanctions spelled 
out in the constitutional amendment. 

Only the International Typographical 
Union voted against the plan. ITU Presi- 
dent Elmer Brown described the amend- 
ment as a "surrender of autonomy" and 
threatened to secede from the federation if 
the approved plan interferes with his union's 
autonomy. Mr. Meany countered with a 
quotation from Samuel Gompers, first Presi- 
dent of the AFL, who in 1902 warned 
affiliates who threatened to secede or with- 
hold money that they faced revocation of 
their rights to representation at the con- 
vention until they paid up and withdrew 
their notice to disaffiliate. 

On the day after the convention's close, 
Mr. Meany appointed David L. Cole, 
former federal mediator, to be an umpire 
under the new dispute settlement procedure. 

Civil Rights Resolution 

The convention unanimously approved a 
civil rights resolution that pledges that the 
federation will "intensify its drive to make 
fully secure equal rights for all Americans 
in every field of life and to assure for all 
workers without regard to race, colour, 
creed, national origin or ancestry the full 
benefits of union membership." 

The new civil rights policy emphasized a 
voluntary approach by affiliates to the prob- 
lem and set up a procedure for the process- 
ing of complaints against offending unions. 
But the resolution empowered the AFL- 
CIO Civil Rights Committee to initiate 
complaints of its own on the basis of prima 
facie evidence that discrimination is being 
practised. 

William Schnitzler, AFL-CIO Secretary- 
Treasurer, was appointed chairman of the 
Civil Rights Committee. 

Re-admission of Expelled Unions 

Before the convention opened, some of 
the AFL-CIO vice-presidents had been pro- 
moting the re-admission of the International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters, expelled in 1957 
on charges of corruption, and others had 
been suggesting the setting-up of an AFL- 
CIO union to take over the Teamsters' 
jurisdiction. But the convention, after only 
a brief discussion, adopted a resolution that 
in effect barred the re-entry; the question 
of an AFL-CIO truckers union did not 
reach the convention floor. 



The resolution, unanimously adopted, did 
not mention the Teamsters by name. It 
stated that whenever an expelled union 
made formal application for re-admittance 
it would have to demonstrate "complete 
observance" of all rules, laws and standards 
of the federation. 

After adoption of the resolution, an 
AFL-CIO spokesman told the press that 
the resolution means in effect that the 
Teamsters couldn't meet this test under its 
present leadership. 

U.S. President's Address 

United States President John Kennedy 
asked for the help of the AFL-CIO in main- 
taining a favourable balance of trade, when 
he spoke to the convention on its opening 
day. "If we cannot maintain the balance of 
trade in our favour," he said, "then this 
country is going to face most serious 
problems." 

He told the delegates he hoped that the 
United States could maintain a viable 
economy with full employment, that it 
could remain competitive in world markets, 
and that management and labour would 
"recognize their responsibility to permit us 
to compete." He was hopeful that "those 
of you who are in the area of wage negotia- 
tions will recognize the desirability of our 
maintaining as stable prices as possible." 

The President implied that negotiators 
should take adequate account of produc- 
tivity when agreeing on wage increases. 

He pointed out that the country's trade 
problems had been intensified by the devel- 
opment of the European Common Market, 
and that United States industries that are 
unable to place their products in the Com- 
mon Market are now building plants in 
Western Europe and hiring Western Euro- 
pean workers. 

He then announced that he intended to 
recommend to the U.S. Congress legislation 
to provide assistance to industries hard-hit 
by imports. It would provide "a recognition 
of the national responsibility in the period 
of transition for those industries and people 
who may be adversely affected." 

The stimulation of trade abroad as a 
means of expanding job opportunities was 
the last of six steps the President believed 
had to be taken "if the manpower budget is 
to be balanced." The other five were: 

— The giving of special attention to the 
problem of younger people. "Today there 
are 1,000,000 young Americans under the 
age of 25 who are out of school and out of 
work." 

— A program of retraining unemployed 
workers. "We want to make sure that our 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



39 



workers are able to take advantage of the 
new jobs that must inevitably come as tech- 
nology changes." 

— Giving attention to minority groups. 
"Those who are first to be discharged and 
last to be rehired too often are among those 
who are members of our minority groups 
.... We are making a great effort to make 
sure that all who secure federal contracts 
will give fair opportunity to all of our citi- 
zens to participate in that work." 

— Provision of opportunities for plant re- 
investment. "I believe we have to give as 
much incentive as is possible to provide 
reinvestment in plant which makes work 
and will keep our economy moving ahead." 

— Grants - in - aid to communities for 
needed public works. The President said he 
intended to ask Congress at its next session 
for stand-by authority to make such grants 
when unemployment begins to mount and 
the economy to slow down. 

The day after President Kennedy's 
address, U.S. Secretary of Labor Arthur 
Goldberg spoke to the convention. He inter- 
preted the President's remarks to mean that 
wage increases over-all should be earned by 
increasing productivity but emphasized that 
there was plenty of room for advances "in 
this highly productive country." 

Inequities exist, he said, and "we do not 
propose in any way to restrict the ability of 
collective bargaining to remove or solve 
these inequities." He urged the delegates to 
try to raise the wages of low-paid workers. 
"One of the unfinished tasks of the trade 
union movement is to direct more of its 
attention to those who are drawing sub- 
standard wages," he said. 

Other Resolutions 

Two resolutions adopted unanimously 
called for higher wages and shorter hours. 
Another rejected a wage freeze and a 



balanced budget as solutions to the country's 
economic problems. 

A fourth resolution urged that Congress 
put into effect immediately the increase to 
$1.25 an hour in the minimum wage that 
is due in September 1963 and urged the 
federation to press for a $1.50 minimum as 
soon as the $1.25 minimum goes into effect. 

The first resolution read: "In collective 
bargaining in the period ahead, AFL-CIO 
affiliated unions will press for wage ad- 
vances as a vital means of increasing inade- 
quate consumer purchasing power." 

The second resolution on collective bar- 
gaining aims urged AFL-CIO affiliates to 
seek: 

— Year-round income or employment and 
adequate benefits upon loss of jobs. 

— Improved health, welfare and pension 
programs. 

— Measures to minimize ill effects on 
workers of automation and plant relocation. 

— Shorter hours with no loss in pay and 
"substantially more paid vacations, holidays 
and other paid leisure time." 

The resolution that declared that this was 
not the time for budget balancing called for 
increased federal expenditures to combat 
unemployment. 

In other resolutions the federation: 

— Declared that the major unfinished 
business of the trade union movement was 
to organize the unorganized. 

— Gave its backing to President Ken- 
nedy's liberalized trade proposals and tariff 
program. 

Election of Officers 

George Meany was re-elected President 
of the AFL-CIO by acclamation. 

All other officers — Secretary-Treasurer 
William Schnitzler and 27 vice-presidents — 
were returned to office. 






THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



Industrial Fatalities in Canada 

during the Third Quarter of 1961 

Deaths from industrial accidents numbered 231 during third quarter last year, 
a decrease of 10 from previous quarter and of 121 from same quarter of 1960 



There were 231* industrial fatalities in 
Canada during the third quarter of 1961, 
according to the latest reports received by 
the Department of Labour. This is a de- 
crease of 10 from the previous quarter, in 
which 241 were recorded, including 25 
in a supplementary list. In the third quarter 
of the previous year, 352 fatalities were 
recorded. 

During the quarter under review, there 
were no accidents that resulted in the deaths 
of three or more persons. 

Grouped by industries (see chart page 
42), the largest number of fatalities, 69, was 
in the construction industry. Of these, 27 
were in buildings and structures, 19 in 
highways and bridges and 23 in miscel- 
laneous construction. For the same period 
last year, 74 fatalities were recorded: 34 
in buildings and structures, 33 in highways 
and bridges and 7 in miscellaneous con- 
struction. During 1961's second quarter, 48 
fatalities were listed: 34 in buildings and 
structures, and 7 each in highways and 
bridges and miscellaneous construction. 

There were 45 fatalities in the manufac- 
turing industry during the quarter; of these, 
20 were in iron and steel products, 5 each 
in food and beverages and transportation 
equipment, 4 in chemical products, 3 
in paper products and 2 each in wood 
products, non-ferrous metal products, non- 
metallic mineral products and miscellaneous 
manufacturing. During the same period last 
year, 58 fatalities were recorded; 15 of 
these were in wood products, 14 in iron and 
steel products, 8 in paper products, 6 in 
food and beverages, 4 in chemical products 
and 2 each in non-ferrous metal products 
and non-metallic mineral products. During 
1961's second quarter, 33 fatalities were 
reported in manufacturing; of these, seven 
were in iron and steel products, five each in 
transportation equipment and non-ferrous 
metal products, four in wood products, and 
three food and beverages and non-metallic 
mineral products. 



*See Tables H-l and H-2 at back of book. The 
number of fatalities that occurred during the third 
quarter of 1961 is probably greater than the figures 
now quoted. Information on accidents that occur but 
are not reported in time for inclusion in the quarterly, 
articles is recorded in supplementary lists and sta- 
tistics are amended accordingly. The figures shown 
include 45 fatalities for which no reports have been 
received. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 

52905-7—4 



Thirty fatalities were recorded in the 
transportation, storage and communication 
industry; twelve of these were in local and 
highway transportation, eight in air trans- 
portation, six in railway transportation and 
three in water transportation. Fatalities 
recorded in this industry for the same period 
in 1960 numbered 54, of which 18 were 
in railway transportation, 17 in local and 
highway transportation, 9 in water trans- 
portation and 4 each in air transportation 
and storage. During April, May and June 
of 1961, 38 persons were killed in this 
industry; 14 of these were in local and 
highway transportation, 8 in water trans- 
portation, 7 in air transportation, 6 in steam 
railways, 2 in street and electric railways 
and 1 in telegraphs and telephones. 

The 23 fatalities that were recorded in 
the mining and quarrying industry during 
the quarter were distributed as follows: 16 
in metal mining, 3 in coal mining and 4 
in non-metallic mineral mining. During the 
same period last year, 57 deaths were re- 
ported: 30 in metal mining, 10 in coal 
mining and 17 in non-metallic mineral 
mining. Accidents during the second quarter 

(Continued on page 86) 



The industrial fatalities recorded in these 
quarterly articles, prepared by the Eco- 
nomics and Research Branch, are those 
fatal accidents that involved persons gain- 
fully employed and that occurred during the 
course of, or which arose out of, their 
employment. These include deaths that 
resulted from industrial diseases as reported 
by the Workmen's Compensation Boards. 

Statistics on industrial fatalities are com- 
piled from reports received from the various 
Workmen's Compensation Boards, the 
Board of Transport Commissioners and 
certain other official sources. Newspaper 
reports are used to supplement these data. 
For those industries not covered by work- 
men's compensation legislation, newspaper 
reports are the Department's only source of 
information. It is possible, therefore, that 
coverage in such industries as agriculture, 
fishing and trapping and certain of the 
service groups is not as complete as in 
those industries which are covered by com- 
pensation legislation. Similarly, a small 
number of traffic accidents which are in 
fact industrial may be omitted from the 
Department's records because of lack of 
information in press reports. 



41 



INDUSTRIAL FATALITIES IN CANADA 
Third Quarter of 1961 




BY INDUSTRY 



10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 



Struck by Machinery, 
Moving Vehicles, etc. 

Falls and Slips 

Collisions, Derailments, 
Wrecks, etc. 

Caught in. On or Between 
Machinery, Vehicles, etc. 

Electric Current 



Inhalations, Absorptions, Asphyx- 
iation and Industrial Diseases 

Conflagrations, Temperature 
Extremes and Explosions 

Over-Exertion 



Striking Against or 
Stepping on Objects 

Miscellaneous Accidents 




BY CAUSE 



Source: Economics and Research Branch, Department of Labour. 



42 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



Civilian Rehabilitation 



New Act in Force 



Vocational Training of Disabled Persons Act proclaimed in force effective 
December 1, 1961. Act provides for sharing with provinces of costs incurred 
in undertaking program for the vocational rehabilitation of disabled persons 



The Act respecting the Vocational 
Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons and the 
Co-ordination of Rehabilitation Services 
(L.G., Nov. 1961, p. 1097) was proclaimed 
in force as of the first day of December 
1961. The Act provides for the sharing with 
the provinces of costs incurred in under- 
taking in the province a comprehensive 
program for the vocational rehabilitation of 
disabled persons. 

New School for the Deaf in Ontario- 
Ontario Public Works Minister Ray Connell 
announced recently that the first stage of 
construction for the new Ontario School 
for the Deaf at Milton would start 
immediately. 

Planned to accommodate 450 pupils, the 
school will have a junior department for 
200, a high school for another 200 and a 
kindergarten for 50. The first stage of con- 
struction includes the junior school, staff 
residence, hospital, administration, laundry 
and boiler plant buildings. This new school 
will do much to alleviate the overtaxed 
facilities at the School for the Deaf in 
Belleville. 

Rehabilitation Awards in Canada — The 

opening of the 18th Annual Christmas Seal 
Sale of Newfoundland provided the 
opportunity for the awarding of the newly 
created C. A. Pippy Awards. These awards, 
donated by Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Pippy, are 
to be presented annually to the outstanding 
handicapped man and woman of the year 
in Newfoundland. 

The awards, presented by Mrs. Campbell 
MacPherson, wife of the Lieutenant 
Governor, went to Miss Helen Traverse of 
Coachman's Cove, White Bay, and Robert 
Windsor of Wesleyville, Bonavista North. 

At 19, Helen Traverse, a victim of severe 
rheumatoid arthritis, has spent 12 years in 
hospital and home unable to walk at all 
and with not enough strength in her arms to 
use a wheelchair. She studied and practised 
at home to become an office worker. She 
worked as a volunteer in the Grenfell 
Children's Home in return for her room and 
board and seized every opportunity to 
improve her work until she became a quali- 
fied office worker. After two years employ- 
ment in the Grenfell Association she moved 
to St. John, where she is now employed in 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

52905-7— 4J 



• JANUARY 7962 



the Rehabilitation Institute. In addition to 
continuing her studies with the hope of 
becoming a teacher of the handicapped, 
she has also organized a club where handi- 
capped people meet for fun and recreation. 
Robert Windsor, married, with one child, 
was stricken with polio at the age of 26. He 
found himself unable to stand or walk, 
with his right arm paralysed and with little 
strength in the left arm. He retained, how- 
ever, a good brain, a sense of humour and 
an outgoing personality. Today he is clerk- 
manager of the town and publishes a small 
newspaper The Wesleyville Messenger, for 
which he types the stencils himself with one 
finger. He has recently gone into an insur- 
ance business and with his combined activi- 
ties he supports himself and his family. 

* * * 

The Second Annual Meeting of the 
Saskatchewan Co-ordinating Council on 
Rehabilitation honoured three industrialists 
for their work on behalf of disabled persons. 
This marks the first time in Canada that 
employers have been given formal recogni- 
tion for their work in this field. The cita- 
tions, to be awarded annually, are to be 
presented to employers who have made an 
outstanding contribution to rehabilitation 
in Saskatchewan by employing disabled 
persons. 

Receiving the awards from Lieutenant 
Governor F. L. Bastedo were Harry Landa, 
owner of "Doc" Landa's Auto Body Works; 
A. J. E. Child, President of Intercontinental 
Pork Packers, both of Saskatoon; and Sher- 
man Smith, Manager, as representative of 
Automotive Remanufacturing Ltd. of 
Regina. 

* * * 

At the 12th Annual Meeting of the 
Saskatchewan Council for Crippled Children 
and Adults "certificates of merit" for out- 
standing and dedicated service were pre- 
sented to J. W. Bremner, Past President of 
the Council, and to the Saskatoon Fire- 
fighters Association, Local 80. Over the 
past nine years the union has consistently 
supplied volunteer spare bus drivers, fi- 
nancially supported a special winter swim- 
ming program for the handicapped, and 
supplied work crews for construction and 
maintenance at Camp Easter Seal. 



43 



Older Workers 



Government Committee on Older Workers 

The Interdepartmental Committee on Older Workers was established in 1953 to 
advise the Department of Labour on the employment problems of older workers 



To advise the Department of Labour on 
the employment problems of older workers, 
there is an Interdepartmental Committee on 
Older Workers, established in 1953 as a 
result of a recommendation of the National 
Advisory Council on Manpower. 

In the beginning the Committee was made 
up of representatives from the Departments 
of Labour, Veterans Affairs, and National 
Health and Welfare, and from the National 
Employment Service. First chairman was 
George G. Blackburn, Director of In- 
formation, Department of Labour. Since 
then a representative of the Civil Service 
Commission has been added, and the pre- 
sent chairman is Ian Campbell, National 
Co-ordinator of Civilian Rehabilitation. 

Its terms of reference, though short, are 
broad in scope. They are: "To give further 
consideration to the employment problems 
of older workers with the object of develop- 
ing a program of education and action 
designed to bring about a wider appreciation 
of the contribution that employed older 
workers can make, and to extend their 
opportunities for suitable jobs." 

The Committee is primarily an advisory 
body but during its eight-year history it has 
initiated several projects. 

In October 1954 it initiated a study of the 
effects of pension plans on the employment 
of older workers. One of its members was 
nominated to chair a study group of selected 
government experts. The group's report was 
published in 1957 under the title Pension 
Plans and the Employment of Older Workers 
(L.G. 1957, p.1435). 

In 1955, a delegate from the Committee 
held discussions in Toronto with repre- 
sentatives of the Canadian Retail Federa- 
tion regarding a survey of work perform- 
ance by age groups in the retail field. After 
this meeting the delegation made pre- 
liminary arrangements for the survey with 
two large firms in the retail industry, with 
the co-operation of both companies. 

The survey was carried out by a team of 
researchers under the direction of the 
Economics and Research Branch of the 
Department of Labour. The report of this 
study was published in 1959 under the title 
Age and Performance in Retail Trade 
(L.G. 1959, p.1022). 

Recognizing that the social and economic 
problem of the older worker was one of 
the many problems of aging, the Committee 



has maintained close liaison with the Cana- 
dian Welfare Council's Committee on 
Aging and has obtained membership on 
the Committee on Aging for its chairman 
and one or more members. 

The Committee believes that the mainten- 
ance of economic security, particularly dur- 
ing the years between ages 40 and 65, can 
do much to prevent the affliction of social 
problems upon individuals when they 
reach the later years. For this reason, the 
committee regards the problem of the older 
worker as one of the more important of 
the many problems of aging. 

When, in 1959, the Division on Older 
Workers was established in the Depart- 
ment's Civilian Rehabilitation Branch, the 
Committee filled an active advisory role in 
the planning and development of the work 
of the new division and in the intensification 
of activities. 

Establishment of the new division was one 
result of the directive of the present 
Minister of Labour, Hon. Michael Starr, to 
intensify efforts on behalf of older workers. 
Another was the stepping-up by the National 
Employment Service of efforts to persuade 
employers to hire on the basis of qualifica- 
tions and ability without regard to age. 

Present membership of the Interdepart- 
mental Committee on Older Workers is: Ian 
Campbell, National Co-Ordinator Civilian 
Rehabilitation, Chairman; A. G. Wilson, 
Chief, Applicant Specialist Division, Head 
Office, National Employment Service; Miss 
Margaret Mclrvine, Co-ordinator of Wo- 
men's Employment, Head Office, National 
Employment Service; W. R. Dymond, 
Assistant Deputy Minister of Labour; 
George G. Blackburn, Director of Informa- 
tion, Department of Labour; J. F. Dawe, 
Civil Service Commission; Miss Marion 
Royce, Director, Women's Bureau, Depart- 
ment of Labour; R. H. Parkinson, Assistant 
National Director, Family Allowances and 
Old Age Security, Department of National 
Health and Welfare; G. L. Mann, Chief, 
Special Services Division, Department of 
Veteran's Affairs; Mrs. F. E. Hurst, Super- 
visor, Welfare Section, Department of 
National Health and Welfare; J. P. Francis, 
Director, Economics and Research Branch, 
Department of Labour; A. Charles Taylor, 
Information Branch, Department of Labour; 
and H. L. Douse, Chief, Division on Older 
Workers, Department of Labour, Secretary. 



44 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



Women's Bureau 

The Working Women of France 

Every third worker in France is a woman, higher proportion than in all but two 
European countries. Working women make up about 39 per cent of all girls and 

women in France over 15 years of age. Two fifths of working women are married 

Every third worker in France is a woman, Although not yet in great numbers, women 

a higher proportion than in any other are also serving as assistant school health 

European country except Finland and Den- officers, police officers, labour inspectors and 

mark. The six and one-half million working industrial relations advisers, 

women make up about 39 per cent of all As in most western countries, there has 

girls and women in France over 15 years of been a steady increase in the number of 

age. About two fifths of the working women women typists, stenographers and clerks so 

are married. that today women hold more than half of 

The percentage of women in each cate- a ^ such jobs, 

gory of employment in 1954 was as follows: Women's wages and equal pay — The prin- 
ciple of "equal pay for equal work" was 

Women as j a j d down [ n a government decree in 1946 

rr t i i? ° ; a nd, in 1953, the ILO equal remuneration 

Types of work all workers ^ .. ..- , n 

' ' „„ . Convention was ratified. 

Owners of industries and businesses... 37.5 w are fixed th h collective bar . 

Professionals and higher executives.... 13.3 . . ° .. «. . . . , „. Ml 

Medium executives 37.6 « amm 8- * e State intervenes only to set the 

White-collar workers 52.6 guaranteed minimum wage, which is the 

Industrial workers 22.6 same for men and women. A 1950 Act 

Service personnel 80.3 respecting collective agreements provides 

Other categories 26.6 that the agreements must contain a clause 

regarding the methods of applying the prin- 

The clothing and textile industries to- c i p i e of equal pay for equal work. Jobs are 

gether employ almost half of the women defined and classified on the basis of work 

working in manufacturing. Metal work, food to be done, its relative importance and the 

processing, leatherwork, chemicals, rubber qualities and aptitudes required to perform 

and printing are other industries where large it. There can therefore be no legal agree- 

numbers of women work. merit providing different rates for men and 

Every seventh professional worker is now women with identical qualifications who are 

a woman. Women represent 2.3 per cent of doing the same work. 

engineers, 2.5 per cent of judges, 7 per cent A recent United Nations survey found 
of doctors, 11 per cent of lawyers, 23 per that women's wages in manufacturing in 
cent of dentists, 28 per cent of pharmacists France are about 85 per cent as high as 
and 39.5 per cent of secondary school and those of men, a higher proportion than in 
university teachers. Women elementary any other country reporting, 
school teachers outnumber men and women Assistance for working mothers — A work- 
are principals in many of these schools. ing woman is by law entitled to maternity 

Many women are managers or directors leave for six weeks before and eight weeks 

of business concerns, not only retail stores, after tne birt h of a child. Furthermore, 

fashion houses and millinery shops where expectant mothers and mothers of children 

one would expect to find women in execu- under two years of age are entitled to a 

tive positions, but also foundries, sawmills, special schedule of physical examinations 

shipping firms, publishing enterprises. °y the state labour medical service. 

The majority of businesses owned by In large centres, day nurseries are avail- 
women are small concerns. Women account able to working mothers some free of 
for only 13.9 per cent of factory owners char S e and ? thers at a sma11 cost - This ser - 
and 28.3 per cent of owners of large busi- Y ice is Provided by about 15 per cent of 
ness establishments. factories for the children of women em- 

¥ .- .. - 1it _ , ir ^ tJ ployees and some creches and day nurseries 

In the expanding health and welfare fields have been subsidized by public funds. Hours 

women's role has been growing in impor- of opening and closing are arranged to cor- 

tance. About 80,000 women are nurses and respond to the normal working hours of 

more than 10,000 are social workers, the mothers. 

The information for this article was supplied through the courtesy of the French 
Embassy in Ottawa. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



45 



From the Labour Gazette, January 1912 



50 Years Ago This Month 



Upward trend in wages continues during 1911 but cost of living also on rise 
during the year. Machinists in Saint John strike in support of demand for a 
nine-hour day, then settle for work week of 53 hours with pay for 57* hours 



The upward trend in wages that began 
in 1909 continued during 1911. No decreases 
in wage rates during the year were reported 
in the Labour Gazette for January 1912 
but in a few cases a reduction in the num- 
ber of working hours caused a drop in 
earnings. 

There was also a general upward trend 
in the cost of living, which was particularly 
marked in the case of farm products. 

In a special article on prices during 1911, 
the Labour Gazette said: "From general 
information as to the level of prices prior 
to 1890 it may be stated that never since 
the first six years of Confederation have 
wholesale prices been so high in Canada. 

"Comparing the year 1911 with 1896, in 
which prices were at their lowest within the 
past 40 years, a rise of 45 per cent is 
shown." The article added that if the rela- 
tively high importance of agricultural prod- 
ucts in Canada were taken into account 
the rise would be 50 per cent or more. 

Specific instances of wage increases dur- 
ing the year given by the Gazette were 
a rise of $10 a month in the wages of farm 
labour in Manitoba, and increases to coal 
miners in Alberta and eastern British 
Columbia averaging about 5 per cent. Many 
increases also were granted in the building 
trades, while in the metal trades and in 
various branches of railway service the 
tendency was also upward. 

* * * 

Early in December 1911, machinists em- 
ployed in the nail factory of James Pender 
& Company, Saint John, N.B., went on 
strike for a nine-hour day instead of the 
ten-hour day they had been working. The 
company argued that the Western factories 
were working ten hours a day, except on 
Saturday, when they worked five hours, but 
that these factories were operating on a 
tonnage basis. This method of working, the 
company contended, resulted in a decidedly 
greater output than the day-work method on 
which its factory was operating. 

The men were told that as soon as the 
mill was put on a tonnage basis, they would 
be allowed a half-holiday on Saturday, but 
that two or three months would be required 
to make the change. Meanwhile, the men 
were given the choice of taking 51 days 



pay for 53 hours work, by starting at 8 a.m. 
instead of 7 a.m., or full pay for full time, 
i.e., 59 hours a week. 

Both these offers were refused, and the 
men demanded a nine-hour day or a half- 
holiday on Saturday at once. When their 
demand was not granted they went on strike. 
Two days later, however, on December 9, 
they decided to accept the company's offer, 
and on December 11 they resumed work. 
On account of the loss caused by the strike, 
the men agreed to work full time for the 
rest of the year, and after that to work 
53 hours per week, for which they would 
receive pay for 574- hours. This would con- 
tinue until the new system was put into 
operation. 

* * * 

"Ruling that the mere fact that a man 
is unemployed for a certain part of the year 
did not constitute sufficient grounds to have 
caused his arrest and conviction on a charge 
of vagrancy, the Court of King's Bench 
(criminal side), sitting in appeal at Mont- 
real, reversed a judgment of the magistrate's 
court, and liberated a prisoner sentenced to 
six months' imprisonment by the lower 
tribunal." 

A report in the Labour Gazette of 
January 1912, from which this extract is 
taken, went on to explain that the prisoner 
in question had in the first place been taken 
into custody on a charge of theft. When 
the charge was not sustained at a court 
hearing, he was promptly re-arrested as 
being without visible means of support. 

It appeared that although the accused 
had not been working during the winter 
preceding his arrest, he was idle only 
because he could not get work at that time 
of the year. His regular employment was 
that of longshoreman, unloading coal barges, 
and he had been left without work at the 
close of navigation. 

"Counsel for the appellant pointed out 
that, if one were to accept the principle 
that a man who was employed for only a 
part of the year could be said to be amen- 
able to arrest for lack of visible means of 
subsistence during the time he was idle, 
chaos would ensue," the Gazette report 
continued. "Seamen, navigators, teachers, 
college professors, and even judges were 
employed but a part of the year." 



46 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



INTERNATIONAL 
LABOUR ORGANIZATION 



New Director of Institute for Labour Studies 

Rt. Hon. Hilary A. Marquand, former British Minister of Pensions and Minister 
of Health, named last month to succeed first Director, Sir Douglas Copeland 



Rt. Hon. Hilary A. Marquand, D.Sc, 
formerly Minister of Pensions and Minister 
of Health of the United Kingdom, is the 
new Director of the ILO International In- 
stitute for Labour Studies. He was named 
November 30 to succeed Sir Douglas Cope- 
land, the first Director of the Institute, who 
resigned in September. 

The Institute will offer its initial course of 
study in September this year. 

Mr. Marquand, who resigned his seat in 
Parliament in order to take up his appoint- 
ment as Director of the Institute, has had a 
distinguished academic and governmental 
career. From 1926 to 1930 he lectured in 
economics at the University of Birmingham. 
From 1930 to 1945 he was Professor of 
Industrial Relations, and later Dean of the 
Faculty of Arts, at the University College 
of Cardiff, one of the constituent colleges of 
the University of Wales. During this period 
he continued his research and studies in the 
structure and organization of industrial com- 
binations and industrial relations, publishing 
his work on The Dynamics of Industrial 
Combinations and, after two years of study 
on a Rockefeller Fellowship at various uni- 
versities in the United States, his Industrial 
Relations in the U.S.A. 

From 1931 to 1936 Mr. Marquand was 
also Director of Industrial Surveys of South 
Wales, publishing two Industrial Surveys of 
South Wales (part-author) and his South 
Wales Needs a Plan. In 1938-39 he taught 
at the University of Wisconsin as a Visiting 
Professor in Economics. He is the editor 
and part-author of Organised Labour in 
Four Continents. In 1938 he was awarded 
the degree of D.Sc. in recognition of his 
published work. 

During the war, Mr. Marquand became 
successively Acting Principal of the Board 
of Trade (1940-41), Deputy Regional Con- 
troller for Wales in the Ministry of Labour 



Further contributions to the endowment 
fund of the ILO International Institute for 
Labour Studies have been announced. 

Italy has decided to contribute 125,000,000 
lire (more than $200,000), the Australian 
Government to contribute $50,000, and 
Sierra Leone to donate $1,000. 

These three bring to about $2,900,000 the 
total of contributions and pledges received 
by the fund. 

Sierra Leone is the twenty-fourth country 
to make or pledge a contribution. 



and Chairman of the Manpower Board for 
Eastern South Wales (1941-42), and Labour 
Adviser to the Minister of Production 
(1942-44). 

After election to Parliament from East 
Cardiff in 1945, Mr. Marquand became 
Secretary for Overseas Trade (1945-47) and 
later Paymaster General (1947-48). In July 
1948 Mr. Marquand was appointed Minister 
of Pensions, a post which he held until he 
became Minister of Health (1951). 

Since 1951, while retaining his Parlia- 
mentary seat, Mr. Marquand has maintained 
an active schedule of teaching and lecturing. 

One of Mr. Marquand's principal respon- 
sibilities during the first year of his appoint- 
ment will be the preparation and adminis- 
tration of the first course of the Institute, 
which is to be held from September 17 to 
December 7. The course will centre round 
the theme of "The Labour Force and Its 
Employment" but will also deal with a 
number of major labour problems, par- 
ticularly as they arise in the countries which 
are in the process of rapid economic 
development. 

The Institute was established by unan- 
imous decision of the Governing Body of 
the ILO to further a better understanding 
of labour problems in all countries and of 
the methods for their solution. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



47 



150th Session, ILO Governing Body 



At its 150th Session, held in Geneva from 
November 21 to 24, the ILO Governing 
Body: 

— Directed that the text of the resolution 
adopted at the 1961 International Labour 
Conference (L.G., Aug. 1961, p. 785) that 
called for the withdrawal of the Republic 
of South Africa from ILO membership until 
such time as it abandons apartheid be sent 
to the South African Government. 

— Decided to convene a preparatory tech- 
nical conference in 1963 to discuss the ques- 
tion of employment policy as a prelude to 
the adoption of an appropriate instrument 
by the International Labour Conference in 
1964. It was agreed that the report to be 
prepared by the ILO for the technical con- 
ference should deal mainly with employment 
problems in the developing countries. 

— Decided to place the following items 
on the agenda of the 1963 session of the 
International Labour Conference: (a) 
Hygiene in shops and offices, and (b) Bene- 
fits in cases of employment accidents and 
occupational diseases. 

— Added two items to the agenda of the 
1962 session: reduction of hours of work 
(supplementary discussion) — a draft Recom- 
mendation on hours of work failed at the 
1961 session of the Conference for want of 
a quorum — and revision of Convention 
No. 82 concerning Social Policy in Non- 
Metropolitan Territories, 1947 — the object 
being to eliminate provisions restricting the 
application of this instrument to non-metro- 
politan territories only. 

In the absence of Shambhu Merani of 
India, Chairman of the Governing Body, 
who had recently been injured in a motor 
accident, the 150th Session was presided 
over in turns by Pierre Waline of France, 
Employers' Vice-Chairman, and Jean Mori 
of Switzerland, Workers' Vice-Chairman. 

Measures to Combat Discrimination 

Pursuant to a resolution adopted by the 
International Labour Conference in 1960, 
the Governing Body resumed its considera- 
tion of measures to combat discrimination 
in respect of employment or occupation. 

Member Governments had been requested 
to report in 1962 on the extent to which 
legislation and practice in their countries 
conformed to Convention No. Ill concern- 
ing Discrimination in respect of Employ- 
ment and Occupation, adopted by the Con- 
ference in 1958. 

The information provided by governments 
will be available to the Committee of 
Experts on the Application of Conventions 



and Recommendations, and to the Confer- 
ence itself, in 1963, and will make possible 
an assessment of the discrimination picture 
throughout the world. Meanwhile, the ILO 
will undertake certain studies and analyses 
of a more limited character, covering, for 
instance, such matters as national fair em- 
ployment machinery. 

The Governing Body also approved a 
major promotional and educational program 
to include: 

— Measures to be taken by governments 
and by employers' and workers' organiza- 
tions; and co-operation for education of the 
appropriate non-governmental organization; 

— Publication by the ILO of studies deal- 
ing with different forms of discrimination 
in employment and with the efficacy of 
specific measures adopted to combat them; 

— Meetings of specialists. It was thought 
that, by bringing to light various types of 
activities and by providing an opportunity 
to compare results, such meetings might be 
of great value to the ILO in the formulation 
of technical assistance programs for the 
elimination of discrimination in employment. 

Finally, the Governing Body requested 
the Director-General to draft new proposals 
for the establishment of ILO machinery to 
deal with allegations of discrimination. 

Complaints Concerning Forced Labour 

A progress report submitted by the Com- 
mission appointed to examine the complaint 
filed by Ghana concerning the observance 
by Portugal of the Abolition of Forced 
Labour Convention, 1957 (No. 105) stated 
that 31 witnesses had been heard. The Com- 
mission would shortly travel to the terri- 
tories to which the complaint related so as 
to supplement on the spot the information 
already collected. 

The Commission hoped that it would be 
able, in its report to the next session of the 
Governing Body, to deal with the whole 
question referred to it and to indicate the 
results of its examination. 

The Governing Body also had before it 
a complaint submitted by Portugal concern- 
ing the observance by Liberia of the Forced 
Labour Convention, 1930 (No. 29). This 
Convention, which was not annulled by the 
1957 Convention on the same subject, has 
been ratified by both Portugal and Liberia. 

The Governing Body decided to ask the 
Portuguese Government to provide by 
December 15 a detailed statement of the 
grounds motivating its complaint and of the 

(Continued on page 96) 



48 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



TEAMWORK 
in INDUSTRY 



The recent "House-Warming" at the 
DeLaval Company Ltd. in Peterboro, Ont., 
has been described by a union official as 
evidence of the mutual respect and con- 
fidence that exists between the firm and its 
employees. The event marked the opening 
of a new $142,000 plant addition. The 
company is one of the largest manufacturers 
of farm and dairy equipment in the Com- 
monwealth. 

Speaking on behalf of Kawartha Lodge 
872, International Association of Machin- 
ists (CLC), local president Gus Siegel 
stated that the calibre of communications, 
consultation and personal relations at 
DeLaval has produced a friendly, con- 
structive job atmosphere. Mr. Siegel 
praised three aspects of the firm's approach 
to employees: " . . . . their willingness to 
give the union information on future plans; 
the use of informal Union Shop Com- 
mittee-Company meetings to talk about 
problems before they develop into griev- 
ances; and management's understanding of 
the necessity for thinking of and treating 
employees as dignified human beings, not 
as machines or numbers." 

He emphasized that the union faced cer- 
tain responsibilities if the excellent labour- 
management relations at DeLaval were to 
be maintained. "While bargaining diligently 
for the economic improvement of the lives 
of its members," he said, "the union must 
approach the company in a reasonable man- 
ner, with a readiness to consider the valid 
problems of the company. We believe that 
the implementation of these principles is 
conducive to the welfare of both the com- 
pany and its employees." 

Diversification and new lines were the 
twin themes behind the celebration. As 
personnel manager Harry Pulley put it: 
"We talk progress here — not hard times. 
This is the way to look at a recession." 

Said president Kenneth Mahood: "If 
you're going to stay in business and lick 
this unemployment problem, you've got to 
think constantly about what else you 
might be doing with your work force and 
plant equipment. Charting a company's 
course five and ten years ahead is not being 
farsighted today — it is an immediate neces- 
sity." 

DeLaval does a healthy export business, 
primarily with the United States. At present, 



45 per cent of the Peterboro plant's produc- 
tion is shipped South. Several months ago 
the company turned its collective labour- 
management skill on a new field of 
endeavour — high and low pressure boilers. 

More than 500 persons — employees, their 
wives and friends — filled the new extension 
for the opening ceremonies. Members of 
the plant Shop Committee, Kawartha Lodge 
No. 872, International Association of 
Machinists (CLC) and of the DeLaval 
Labour-Management Safety Committee 
assisted in organizing the House-Warming. 

According to personnel manager Pulley, 
employees were "in" on the extension plans 
from the start. "We tell our people ahead 
or time what we plan to do," he said "We 
like to get their point of view." He stated 
that no obstacle barring good labour-man- 
agement relations was too great to be over- 
come by joint consultation. 
* * * 

More than 500 visitors attended the one- 
day Open House at St. Vincent Hospital 
in Ottawa recently, the first to be held in 
the institution's 37-year history. Director of 
personnel Deo Ledoux described the affair 
as a "great success". 

He praised St. Vincent's Labour-Manage- 
ment Consulting Committee for planning 
and organizing the venture. Guests were 
greeted at the hospital's main entrance by 
committee representatives and guided by 42 
nurses and students through the various 
departments. 

Stops on the Open House tour included 
the chapel, auditorium, laboratory, 
solariums, sterilization and treatment rooms, 
X-ray department, occupational, physio- 
and electrotherapy centres, gymnasium, 
dispensary, medical library, kitchen, 
cafeteria, canteen, linen room, laundry and 
offices. Department heads outlined the 
duties of the centres under their direction, 
and answered the many questions asked by 
the visitors. Guests were handed a brief 
history of St. Vincent's together with a set 
of statistics involved in the hospital's 
operation. 

Mr. Ledoux said the Labour-Management 
Consulting Committee was never idle. 
"Realizations follow one after the other," 
he said. "It has many other projects on its 
agenda." 



Establishment of Labour-Management 
Committees is encouraged and assisted by 
the Labour-Management Co-operation Serv- 
ice, Industrial Relations Branch, Department 
of Labour. In addition to field representa- 
tives located in key industrial centres who 
are available to help both managements and 
trade unions, the Service provides various 
aids in the form of booklets, posters and 
films. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



49 



INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 
AND CONCILIATION 



Certification and Other Proceedings before 

the Canada Labour Relations Board 



The Canada Labour Relations Board met 
for three days during November. 

The Board issued four certificates desig- 
nating bargaining agents, rejected seven 
applications for certification and one 
application for revocation of certification, 
and denied one request under Section 61(2) 
of the Act for review of an earlier decision. 

During the month the Board received ten 
applications for certification and three 
requests under Section 61(2) of the Act for 
review of earlier decisions. It allowed the 
withdrawal of two applications for certif- 
ication, and the Minister of Labour referred 
to the Board a complaint under Section 43 
of the Act alleging failure to bargain col- 
lectively. 

Applications for Certification Granted 

1. National Association of Broadcast 
Employees and Technicians, on behalf of 
a unit of production employees employed 
by the Canadian Marconi Company at 
CFCF-TV in Montreal (L.G., Nov. 1961, 
p. 1147). The International Alliance of 
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving 
Picture Machine Operators of the United 
States and Canada and the Marconi Salaried 
Employees' Association (CFCF-TV) has 
intervened. 

2. United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners of America, Local Union No. 2499, 
on behalf of a unit of carpenters employed 
by General Enterprises Ltd., working in 
and out of Whitehorse, Y.T. (L.G., Nov. 
1961, p. 1149). 

3. Civil Service Association of Canada, 
on behalf of a unit of sergeants and con- 
stables employed by the National Harbours 
Board in the harbour police force at Quebec 
City (L.G., Nov. 1961, p. 1150). 

4. Brotherhood of Railway and Steam- 
ship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express and 
Station Employees, on behalf of a unit of 



longshoremen employed by Gaspe Shipping 
Reg'd. engaged in the loading and unload- 
ing of interior and coastwise vessels in the 
Port of Quebec (L.G., Dec. 1961, p. 1269). 

Applications for Certification Rejected 

1. National Marine Engineers' Beneficial 
Association of Canada, on behalf of a unit 
of marine engineers employed by Dominion 
Steel and Coal Corporation (Dominion 
Shipping Division), Montreal, Que. (L.G., 
Nov. 1961, p. 1149). The National Associa- 
tion of Marine Engineers of Canada Inc., 
Great Lakes and Eastern District, had inter- 
vened. 

2. National Marine Engineers' Beneficial 
Association of Canada, on behalf of a unit 
of marine engineers employed by Hall 
Corporation of Canada, Montreal, Que. 
(L.G., Nov. 1961, p. 1149). The National 
Association of Marine Engineers of Canada 
Inc., Great Lakes and Eastern District, had 
intervened. 

3. National Marine Engineers' Beneficial 
Association of Canada, on behalf of a unit 
of marine engineers employed by N. M. 
Paterson & Sons Limited, Montreal, Que. 
(L.G., Nov. 1961, p. 1150). The National 
Association of Marine Engineers of Canada 
Inc., Great Lakes and Eastern District, had 
intervened. 

4. National Marine Engineers' Beneficial 
Association of Canada, on behalf of a unit 
of marine engineers employed by The 
Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway 
Company, Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. (L.G., 
Nov. 1961, p. 1150). The National Associa- 
tion of Marine Engineers of Canada Inc., 
Great Lakes and Eastern District, had inter- 
vened. 

5. National Marine Engineers' Beneficial 
Association of Canada, on behalf of a unit 
of marine engineers employed by National 
Sand & Material Company Limited, Toronto, 



This section covers proceedings under the Industrial Relations and Disputes Investi- 
gation Act, involving the administrative services of the Minister of Labour, the Canada 
Labour Relations Board, and the Industrial Relations Branch of the Department. 



50 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



Ont. (L.G., Nov. 1961, p. 1150). The 
National Association of Marine Engineers of 
Canada Inc., Great Lakes and Eastern 
District, had intervened. 

6. National Marine Engineers' Beneficial 
Association of Canada, on behalf of a unit 
of marine engineers employed by Scott 
Misener Steamships Limited, Port Colborne, 
Ont. (L.G., Nov. 1961, p. 1150). The 
National Association of Marine Engineers 
of Canada Inc., Great Lakes and Eastern 
District, had intervened. 

7. National Marine Engineers' Beneficial 
Association of Canada, on behalf of a unit 
of marine engineers employed by K. A. 
Powell (Canada) Ltd., Fort William, Ont. 
(L.G., Nov. 1961, p. 1150). The National 
Association of Marine Engineers of Canada 
Inc., Great Lakes and Eastern District, had 
intervened. 

The above applications for certification 
were rejected by the Board for the reason 



that the applicant had failed to show mem- 
bership in good standing in accordance with 
its constitution, as required by Rule 15 
of the Board's Rules of Procedure. In reach- 
ing its decision, the Board observed that the 
Canadan constitution of the applicant 
organization does not specify the amounts 
of initiation fees and dues and depends on 
the provisions of the constitution of the 
parent organization, which sets the initia- 
tion fee at $1,000 and monthly dues at $10. 
In these cases the applicant had collected 
$1.00 initiation fees and $4.00 monthly 
dues. The applicant had tendered a pur- 
ported waiver of the initiation fee and dues 
required under the constitution, but the 
Board did not consider this to be a waiver 
in the terms required by the constitution. 

Application for Revocation Rejected 

Maurice Rose, et al, applicants, Consoli- 
dated Aviation Fueling and Services 



Scope and Administration ot Industrial Relations and Disputes Investigation Act 



Conciliation services under the Industrial 
Relations and Disputes Investigation Act are 
provided by the Minister of Labour through 
the Industrial Relations Branch. The branch 
also acts as the administrative arm of the 
Canada Labour Relations Board, in matters 
under the Act involving the board. 

The Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act came into force on Sep- 
tember 1, 1948. It revoked the Wartime 
Labour Relations Regulations, P.C. 1003, 
which became effective in March, 1944, and 
repealed the Industrial Disputes Investigation 
Act, which had been in force from 1907 
until superseded by the Wartime Regulations 
in 1944. Decisions, orders and certificates 
given under the Wartime Regulations by the 
Minister of Labour and the Wartime Labour 
Relations Board are continued in force and 
effect by the Act. 

The Act applies to industries within 
federal jurisdiction, i.e., navigation, shipping, 
interprovincial railways, canals, telegraphs, 
interprovincial and international steamship 
lines and ferries, aerodromes and air trans- 
portation, radio broadcasting stations and 
works declared by Parliament to be for the 
general advantage of Canada or two or 
more of its provinces. Additionally, the Act 
provides that provincial authorities, if they 
so desire, may enact similar legislation for 
application to industries within provincial 
jurisdiction and make mutually satisfactory 
arrangements with the federal Government 
for the administration of such legislation. 

The Minister of Labour is charged with 
the administration of the Act and is directly 
responsible for the appointment of con- 
ciliation officers, conciliation boards, and 
Industrial Inquiry Commissions concerning 
complaints that the Act has been violated 
or that a party has failed to bargain collec- 
tively, and for application for consent to 
prosecute. 

The Canada Labour Relations Board is 
established under the Act as successor to 



the Wartime Labour Relations Board to 
administer provisions concerning the certi- 
fication of bargaining agents, the writing of 
provisions — for incorporation into collective 
agreements — fixing a procedure for the final 
settlement of disputes concerning the mean- 
ing or violation of such agreements and the 
investigation of complaints referred to it by 
the minister that a party has failed to 
bargain collectively and to make every 
reasonable effort to conclude a collective 
agreement. 

Copies of the Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act, the Regulations 
made under the Act, and the Rules of 
Procedure of the Canada Labour Relations 
Board are available upon request to the 
Department of Labour, Ottawa. 

Proceedings under the Industrial Rela- 
tions and Disputes Investigation Act are 
reported below under two headings: (1) 
Certification and other Proceedings before 
the Canada Labour Relations Board, and 
(2) Conciliation and other Proceedings 
before the Minister of Labour. 

Industrial Relations Officers of the De- 
partment of Labour are stationed at Vancou- 
ver, Winnipeg, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, 
Fredericton, Halifax and St. John's, New- 
foundland. The territory of four officers 
resident in Vancouver comprises British 
Columbia, Alberta and the Yukon and 
Northwest Territories; two officers stationed 
in Winnipeg cover the province of Saskat- 
chewan and Manitoba and Northwestern 
Ontario; four officers resident in Toronto 
confine their activities to Ontario; five 
officers in Montreal are assigned to the 
province of Quebec, and a total of three 
officers resident in Fredericton, Halifax and 
St. John's represent the Department in the 
Maritime Provinces and Newfoundland. The 
headquarters of the Industrial Relations 
Branch and the Director of Industrial Rela- 
tions and staff are situated in Ottawa. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



51 



Limited, Montreal, Que., respondent, and 
the International Association of Machin- 
ists, respondent (L.G., Nov. 1961, p. 1150). 
The application was rejected for the reason 
that the Board had acted on the informa- 
tion before it at the time the application for 
certification was considered, and did not 
consider that its decision should be changed 
by the information that subsequently came 
to light. 

Request for Review under Section 61 (2) Denied 

Local 882, International Union of Operat- 
ing Engineers, applicant, United Grain 
Growers Limited, respondent, and Grain 
Workers' Union, Local 333, intervener (L.G., 
Oct. 1961, p. 1038). The Board denied 
the request for the reasons that (1) while 
the applicant was certified in 1947 as the 
bargaining agent for a unit of stationary 
engineers employed by the respondent, it 
is clear that the only stationary engineers 
then concerned were casually employed 
engineers employed in grain drying opera- 
tions; that (2) the pellet plant operators are 
stationary engineers only incidentally and 
for a small portion of their working time; 
that (3) the pellet plant operators would 
not appear to be employed to a sufficient 
extent as stationary engineers to qualify as 
craftsmen under Section 8 of the Industrial 
Relations and Disputes Investigation Act; 
that (4) the pellet plant operators take on 
other plant jobs when not operating the 
mill, which jobs are within the scope of the 
certificate and collective agreement held 
by the plant union, Grain Workers' Union, 
Local 333, and that (5) it would be 
impracticable from the standpoint of 
efficient plant operations to operate the mill 
with full-time stationary engineers. 

Applications for Certification Received 

1. Canadian Maritime Union, on behalf 
of a union of unlicensed personnel employed 
aboard the S.S. Hilda Marjanne by Trans- 
Lake Shipping Limited, Toronto, Ont. 
(Investigating Officers: R. L. Fournier and 
A. B. Whitfield). 

2. International Association of Machin- 
ists, on behalf of a unit of unlicensed per- 
sonnel employed aboard the M. V. Inland 
by the Quebec North Shore and Labrador 
Railway Co., Sept lies, Que. (Investigat- 
ing Officer: C. E. Poirier). 

3. National Association of Broadcast 
Employees and Technicians, on behalf of 
a unit of television technicians and 
engineers employed at CKSO-TV by CKSO 
Radio Limited, Sudbury, Ont. (Investigating 
Officer: A. B. Whitfield). 



4. Canadian Maritime Union, on behalf 
of a unit of unlicensed personnel employed 
aboard the M.S. Normac, S.S. Norgoma and 
S.S. Norisle by the Owen Sound Transporta- 
tion Co., Limited, Owen Sound, Ont. 
(Investigating Officers: R. L. Fournier and 
A. B. Whitfield). 

5. Canadian Maritime Union, on behalf 
of a unit of unlicensed personnel employed 
aboard the S.S. Keewatin and S.S. Assiniboia 
by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, 
(Great Lakes Steamships), Montreal, Que. 
(Investigating Officers: R. L. Fournier and 
A. B. Whitfield). 

6. The Canadian Union of Operating 
Engineers, on behalf of a unit of stationary 
engineers employed by Canadian Arsenals 
Limited at its Small Arms Division, Long 
Branch, Ont. (Investigating Officer: A. B. 
Whitfield). 

7. Amalgamated Association of Street 
Electric Railway and Motor Coach 
Employees of America, Division 591, on 
behalf of a unit of bus operators and garage 
employees employed by Hull City Transport 
Limited, Hull, Que. (Investigating Officer: 
G. A. Lane). 

8. Amalgamated Association of Street, 
Electric Railway and Motor Coach 
Employees of America, Division 591, on 
behalf of a unit of bus operators and garage 
employees employed by Hull Metropolitan 
Transport Limited, Hull, Que. (Investi- 
gating Officer: G. A. Lane). 

9. United Steelworkers of America, on 
behalf of a unit of production employees 
employed by Canadian Arsenals Limited at 
its Small Arms Division, Long Branch, Ont. 
(Investigating Officer: A. B. Whitfield). 

10. Line Drivers, Warehousemen, Pick- 
up Men & Dockmen's Union, Local No. 
605, of the International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America, on behalf of a unit of 
drivers employed by Zenith Transport Ltd., 
Vancouver, B.C. (Investigating Officer: D. 
S. Tysoe). 

Requests for Review under Section 61 (2) 
Received 

1. Request by North American Van Lines 
(Atlantic) Limited for review of the 
certificate issued by the Board on October 
2, 1961 to the Teamsters, Chauffeurs, 
Warehousemen and Helpers Union, Local 
927, of the International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America (L.G., Nov. 1961, p. 
1147). 

2. Request for review of the certificate 
issued by the Board on June 9, 1961, 



52 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



affecting the International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America, General Truck Drivers 
Union, Local 938, and Transport Drivers, 
Warehousemen and Helpers Union, Local 
106, applicants, and St. Johns (Iberville) 
Transport Ltd., Iberville, Que., respondent 
(L.G., Aug. 1961, p. 794). 

3. Request for review of certificate issued 
by the Board on November 10, 1955, affect- 
ing the International Alliance of Theatrical 
Stage Employees and Moving Picture 
Machine Operators of the United States and 
Canada, applicant, and Atlantic Broad- 
casters Ltd., Antigonish, N.S., respondent 
(L.G. 1956, p. 74). 



Applications for Certification Withdrawn 

1. Seafarers' International Union of 
Canada, applicant, and Eagle Shipping and 
Investment Co. Ltd., Hamilton, Bermuda, 
respondent (unlicensed personnel) (L.G., 
Oct. 1961, p. 1037). 

Complaint under Section 43 of Act Received 

The Minister of Labour referred to the 
Board a complaint made by the Van- 
couver-New Westminster Newspaper Guild, 
Local 115, American Newspaper Guild, 
alleging that the Vantel Broadcasting Co., 
Ltd., Vancouver, B.C., had failed to bar- 
gain collectively (L.G., Aug. 1961, p. 794). 



Conciliation and Other Proceedings 

before the Minister of Labour 



Conciliation Officers Appointed 

During November, the Minister of Labour 
appointed conciliation officers to deal with 
the following disputes: 

1. British Columbia Towboat Owners' 
Association, Vancouver, and Marine En- 
gineers, Local 425 of the Canadian Brother- 
hood of Railway, Transport and General 
Workers (Conciliation Officer: G. R. 
Currie). 

2. British Columbia Towboat Owners' 
Association, Vancouver, and Canadian Mer- 
chant Service Guild, Inc. (Conciliation 
Officer: G. R. Currie). 

3. Canadian Freightways Limited, Cal- 
gary, Alta., and Local 605 of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America (Conciliation Officer: D. S. 
Tysoe). 

4. Motor Transport Industrial Relations 
Bureau, Toronto (representing 47 companies 
within federal jurisdiction) and Locals 879, 
880 and 938 of the International Brother- 
hood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehouse- 
men and Helpers of America (Conciliation 
Officers: F. J. Ainsborough and T. B. 
McRae). 

5. Soo-Security Motorways Limited, Win- 
nipeg, and Local 979 of the International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffers, Ware- 
housemen and Helpers of America (Con- 
ciliation Officer: J. S. Gunn). 

Settlements Reported by Conciliation Officers 

1. Canadian Pacific Railway Company 
(Merchandise Services Department) and 
Brotherhood of Railway and Steamship 



Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express and 
Station Employees (Conciliation Officer: 
F. J. Ainsborough) (L.G., Dec, p. 12'69). 

2. Upper Lakes Shipping Limited (Grain 
Elevator Division), Goderich, Ont., and 
Local 23736 of the Canadian Labour Con- 
gress (Conciliation Officer: T. B. McRae) 
(L.G., Dec, p. 1269). 

3. Gill Interprovincial Lines Limited, 
Vancouver, B.C., and Local 605 of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
American (Conciliation Officer: G. R. 
Currie) (L.G., Nov., p. 1150). 

4. Trans-Canada Air Lines, Montreal, 
and Trans-Canada Air Lines Sales Em- 
ployees Association (Conciliation Officer: 
Remi Duquette) (L.G., Oct., p. 1040). 

Conciliation Boards Fully Constituted 

1. The Board of Conciliation and Inves- 
tigation established in October to deal with 
a dispute between Frontenac Broadcasting 
Company (CKWS-TV) Kingston, Ont., and 
International Alliance of Theatrical Stage 
Employees and Moving Picture Machine 
Operators of the United States and Canada 
(L.G., Dec, p. 1270) was fully constituted 
in October with the appointment of His 
Honour Judge W. S. Lane, Picton, Ont., as 
Chairman. Judge Lane was appointed on the 
joint recommendation of the other two 
members, D. G. Cunningham, Q.C., and 
Frank Quaife, both of Kingston, who were 
previously appointed on the nomination of 
the company and union, respectively. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



53 



2. The Board of Conciliation and Inves- 
tigation established in October to deal with 
a dispute between Dominion Steel and Coal 
Corporation, Ltd., Dominion Shipping Divi- 
sion, Montreal, and Seafarers' International 
Union of North America, Canadian District 
(L.G., Dec, p. 1270) was fully constituted 
in November with the appointment of G. D. 
LaViolette, of Montreal, as Chairman. Mr. 
LaViolette was appointed by the Minister in 
the absence of a joint recommendation from 
the other two members, Raymond Caron, 
Q.C., and Roderick Hayes, both of Mont- 
real, who were previously appointed on the 
nomination of the company and union, 
respectively. 

Conciliation Board Reports Received 

1. H. W. Bacon Limited, Toronto, and 
Local 419 of the International Brotherhood 
of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen 
and Helpers of America (L.G., Nov., 
p. 1151). The text of the report is repro- 
duced below. 

2. The Commercial Cable Company, and 
Seafarers' International Union of Canada, 



S.S. Cable Guardian (unlicensed personnel) 
(licensed engineers) (L.G., Nov., p. 1151). 
The text of the report is reproduced below. 

3. Quebec Paper Sales and Transportation 
Company Limited, Donnacona, Que., and 
Seafarers' International Union of Canada 
(L.G., Nov., p. 1151). The text of the 
report is reproduced below. 

4. Federal Commerce and Navigation 
Company Limited, Montreal, and Seafarers' 
International Union of North America, 
Canadian District (L.G., Aug., p. 797). The 
text of the report is reproduced below. 

5. Motor Transport Industrial Relations 
Bureau, Toronto, (representing certain com- 
panies within federal jurisdiction) and Local 
880 of the International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America (L.G., Nov., p. 1151). 
The text of the report is reproduced below. 

Settlement Reached after Board Procedure 

H. W. Bacon Limited, Toronto, and Local 
419 of the International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America (see above). 



Report of Board in Dispute between 

H.W. Bacon Limited, Toronto 

and 

International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, 
Warehousemen and Helpers of America 



The Conciliation Board — S. E. Dinsdale, 
Employer Nominee, Paul Siren, Union 
Nominee, and R. G. Geddes, Chairman — 
met with the representatives of the parties 
at the King Edward Hotel, Toronto, Ont. 



During November, the Minister of Labour 
received the Report of the Board of Con- 
ciliation and Investigation established to 
deal with a dispute between H. W. Bacon 
Limited, Toronto, and Local 419 of the 
International Brotherhood of Teamsters, 
Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America. 

The Board was under the chairmanship 
of R. G. Geddes of Toronto. He was 
appointed by the Minister on the joint 
recommendation of the other two members, 
S. E. Dinsdale and Paul Siren, both of 
Toronto, nominees of the company and 
union, respectively. 

The Report was signed by all three mem- 
bers but has attached to it addenda sub- 
mitted by Mr. Dinsdale and Mr. Siren. 

The Report and addenda are reproduced 
here. 



Present for the company were: W. J. 
Whittaker, counsel, and H. E. Bacon, R. 
Lienhart and R. McDowell, committee. 

Present for the union were: lack 
Robinson, spokesman, and Bud Bodkin, Ed 
Hawkshaw, George Hatzincolaou, W. 
Knight, F. W. Green, A. Bragan, A. Bell, 
and C. lohnston, committee. 

Just before the establishment of the 
federal board, an Ontario conciliation board 
had been set up to deal with a dispute 
between these parties concerning a bargain- 
ing unit composed of the employees in the 
Cartage Division of the company. The 
provincial board had the same members and 
the committees of the parties were made up 
of the same individuals. These federal 
negotiations were concentrated on the 
federal problems but overlapped to some 
extent. The attempts to settle the two 
disputes were co-ordinated. 

The federal negotiations lasted through- 
out the night and the meetings adjourned 



54 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



only after the Board became convinced that 
nothing further could be done and agree- 
ment at the Board level was not possible. 

In the late hours the Chairman of the 
Conciliation Board made recommendations 
on each matter left in dispute to both 
parties. In some of these recommendations 
he was joined by the company nominee 
and the union nominee dissented, and in 
others the union nominee agreed and the 
company nominee did not. 

There has been no significant change in 
the Chairman's attitude on any of the issues 
and the recommendations made to the 
parties at the hearings now become the 
Board's recommendations if one or the other 
or both of the side members will concur. 

If neither member will join in a Board 
Report, these recommendations are those of 
the Chairman. 

The recommendations are as follows: 

Term— From June 1, 1961 to May 31, 
1963. (Alternative provided in Article 13.01 
if parties agree upon a three-year term.) 

Article 1.01 — To read as follows: The 
Company recognizes the Union as the 
exclusive Collective Bargaining Agency for 
all employees in its Mail Division employed 
at and working out of Toronto, save and 
except foremen, supervisors and other per- 
sons above the rank of foreman, office staff, 
employees classified in its Cartage Division 
and Garage employees. 

Part-time personnel employed on the 
afternoon mail pick-up for not more than 
twenty hours per week are excluded but 
the Company agrees to pay them the same 
rate paid regular employees doing the 
same work. 

Article 1.04 (new Section) — To read as 
follows: No work will be performed by 
Supervisory Employees who are outside the 
Bargaining Unit or by Office Staff when 
such performance will displace Bargaining 
Unit Employees who are at work during 
their regular working hours and who are 
willing and able to perform the work. 

This provision shall not be used by the 
Company to deprive employees of overtime. 
The Company, however, shall not be re- 
quired to call employees in to work overtime 
under this section when the duration of the 
work required or other consideration makes 
it impractical for the Company so to do. 

Article 1.05 (New Section) — To read as 
follows: No part-time employee will be 
retained when a regular Postal Division 
employee is on short time or on layoff. 

Article 7.02 — (New Section) — To read as 
follows: During the term of this agree- 
ment, the Company agrees that it will only 



penalize an employee for an activity relat- 
ing to a strike, slowdown or suspension of 
work if such activity is in violation of the 
federal labour or postal laws. 

The parties agree that an arbitration 
board established under this agreement is 
competent to decide if the activity of an 
employee is or is not in violation of the 
federal labour or postal laws. 

Article 8.10 — This section to be deleted 
in its entirety. 

Article 11.05 — Re-write as follows: If a 
paid statutory holiday falls within an 
employee's vacation period he will be 
granted another day at a time mutually 
satisfactory to the Company and the 
employee, or a day's pay in lieu thereof. 
However, if an employee who has been at 
work within seven calendar days prior to 
the beginning of his vacation period is 
absent the Saturday immediately before 
the beginning of his vacation for any 
reason other than sickness proved to the 
Company's satisfaction, he shall be fined 
$20.00 in addition to losing pay for the 
hours absent. 

Article 12.01 — Re-write as follows: 
Effective (insert date of signing) the 
Company agrees to pay time and one-half 
employees' regular rates for authorized 
work performed in excess of nine (9) hours 
per day and forty-five (45) hours per week. 

Article 12.02 — Re-write as follows: The 
Company from time to time will establish 
schedules of working hours which will be as 
beneficial as is reasonable to the employees 
subject to the requirements put on the 
Company by its contract with the Postal 
Department. Before establishing schedules of 
working hours the Company will consult 
with the Union Committee. 

Article 12.03 (New Section) — To read as 
follows: The Company agrees that when 
assigning overtime work it will give prefer- 
ence to senior employees within the section 
who are qualified and available to perform 
the work to be done. 

Article 13.01 — Wage Rates — Raise wages 
for all employees as follows: 

(1) Effective beginning of pay period 
following signature 10<£ per hour, (2) Effec- 
tive December 1, 1961, 05 $ per hour, 

(3) Effective June 1, 1962, 054 per hour, 

(4) Effective December 1, 1962, 05tf per 
hour. 

The Company to pay to employees on the 
payroll on the date of signature an amount 
in lieu of all retroactivity equal to lOtf per 
hour for all hours worked between June 1, 
1961 and the beginning of the pay period 
following date of signing. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY J962 



55 



The Conciliation Board believes that both 
parties would prefer a three-year agreement 
but in the final hours of the hearings turned 
to discussions of a two-year contract because 
they were closer to agreement with a two- 
year extension. 

The Conciliation Board also believes that 
a three-year agreement is preferable, to 
expire on May 31, 1964. 

If the parties decide to make a three-year 
agreement, the Board recommends the fol- 
lowing wage increases: 

( 1 ) Effective beginning of pay period fol- 
lowing signature lOtf per hour, (2) Effective 
December 1, 1961, 54 per hour, (3) Effec- 
tive June 1, 1962, 54 per hour, (4) Effective 
December 1, 1962, 54 per hour, (5) Effec- 
tive June 1, 1963, 54 per hour, (6) Effective 
December 1, 1963, 54 per hour. 

If the parties decide on a three-year agree- 
ment the Board recommends the same retro- 
activity, the same welfare, the same vaca- 
tions, the same statutory holidays, and the 
same settlement on all other monetary as 
well as non-monetary matters as recom- 
mended in the Report. 

Article 14.01 — Amend to provide that 
the Company pays an additional $4.00 per 
month for a total of $12.00 per month to 
the Ontario Teamsters Welfare Fund for 
each regular company employee. 

Article 16.07 — In addition to the arrange- 
ments to provide work clothing already con- 
ceded by the Company, the Board recom- 
mends that the Company pay one half of 
the cost of three-quarter-length jackets for 
the employees; jackets to be replaced at 
intervals decided by the parties. 

Article 17.01 — Amend to establish union 
shop provisions. 

General: 

(a) Some re-numbering of Articles and 
Sections may be necessary. 

(b) The parties have agreed to preferen- 
tial treatment for a reasonable number of 
union stewards to avoid layoff. The Board 
recommends that provisions be introduced 
into the collective agreement to cover this 
understanding. 

(c) Both before the Conciliation Board 
was established and during the Board's 
hearings the parties agreed upon other mat- 
ters. The Conciliation Board recommends 
that all agreements reached by the parties 
be confirmed and introduced into the collec- 
tive agreement. 

(d) The Board recommends that all pro- 
visions not agreed by the parties and not 
mentioned in this Report remain as in 
previous agreement. 



All of which is respectfully submitted, 

(Sgd.) R. G. Geddes, 
Chairman. 

(Sgd.) S. E. Dinsdale, 
Member. 

(Sgd.) Paul Siren, 
Member. 

Toronto, Ontario, October 17, 1961. 



ADDENDUM OF COMPANY NOMINEE 

I concur in the foregoing report of this 
Board of Conciliation, subject to the follow- 
ing reservations. 

I wish to note my disagreement with 
certain principles in some of the recom- 
mendations set forth by the Chairman. 

The first item to which I refer is the 
proposed Article 1.04. I cannot agree with 
the principle of this clause, which deprives 
management of its freedom to assign work 
in the most efficient manner. In my view, 
the entire principle of such a clause is 
wrong, but I wish to emphasize particular 
disagreement with that portion of the recom- 
mendation which would require the Com- 
pany to call employees back to work over- 
time in certain circumstances, rather than 
use superivsory employees already available. 
This introduces an inefficiency, that is not in 
the long-run best interests of the employer, 
the employees or the Union. In addition to 
this, there remains unresolved between the 
parties, the Union's demand for a minimum 
recall allowance of four hours' pay. The 
two items can prove very costly. 

In regard to the recommendation under 
Article 1.05, I would observe only that such 
a provision may raise untold difficulties in 
administration. It is my view that the appli- 
cation of this clause should be limited to 
instances where regular employees are on 
layoff. 

The next item I raise is that contained 
under the heading Article 7.02, relating to 
the Company's freedom to penalize an 
employee during the term of the agreement 
for an activity relating to a strike, slowdown 
or suspension of work. I understand and 
appreciate that the Chairman is endeavour- 
ing to assist the parties around a most diffi- 
cult issue in making this recommendation, 
but I must record my disagreement with any 
provision that restricts the Company in hav- 
ing its employees carry out its work as this 
suggested clause might well do. Bearing in 
mind that the labour laws do not deal with 
such matters as criminal restriction, etc., 
such a provision as this could amount to a 
contractual commitment not to take appro- 
priate action as a result of such activities. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



This recommendation goes far beyond what 
the Company should be expected to do to 
resolve a collective agreement. 

I disagree vigorously with the recom- 
mendation that the agreement contain a 
"union shop provision". The principle of 
the union shop is vicious in my view, in that 
it effectively deprives employees of "free- 
dom of association" which is supposed to 
be their right under our laws. I could not, 
in any circumstances, recommend to this 
Company that it agree to a provision 
whereby its employees must become and 
remain members of the Teamsters union 
in order to keep their jobs. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Dated at Toronto this 28th day of 
October, 1961. 

(Sgd.) Stanley E. Dinsdale, 
Member. 

ADDENDUM OF UNION NOMINEE 

While I have joined the Chairman of 
the Board of Conciliation in the report in 
the main, I wish to clarify and differentiate 
my findings and recommendations in the 
following manner: 

Article 1.04 (New Section) — I disagree 
with the last sentence of the second para- 
graph of the Chairman's report. In my 
judgment this sentence destroys the intent of 
the section. 

Article 7.02 (New Section) — I recom- 
mend that this clause read as follows: "The 
Company agrees that it will not discipline, 
suspend or discharge any employee for his 
refusal to cross a picket line." This matter 
is entirely within the competence of the 
employer and is not related to any statutory 
or legal requirement. 



Article 11.05 — I disagree with the last 
sentence of the report as it relates to this 
Article. The recommendation exceeds any 
request of the Company and I consider the 
introduction of the suggested penalty of 
$20.00 referred to in the report as being 
extraneous to any discussion or considera- 
tion held by either party during the meet- 
ings of the Board. I would recommend the 
first sentence of the report as it relates to 
Article 11.05. 

Article 12.02—1 recommend the follow- 
ing language for this section: "The hours of 
work, including starting and quitting times 
shall be agreed upon between the Com- 
pany and the Union. There will be no 
change in such hours of work, except when 
such change is agreed to by the Company 
and Union, or in the event the Postal 
Department of the Dominion Government 
requires a change in working hours to 
meet its commitments, at which time the 
Union shall be advised and the matter dis- 
cussed with a view to achieve the most 
suitable hours of work for all concerned." 

Article 13.01 — Wage Rates. — In the 
absence of specific consideration by the 
parties of wage increases in the event of a 
three-year agreement, I would refrain from 
this recommendation. 

Article 14.01. — I recommend that the 
$12.00 contribution by the Company for 
each employee be effective on October 1, 
1961, which I understand to be the renewal 
date of the welfare plan. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

(Sgd.) Paul Siren, 
Member. 
Toronto, Ontario. 
October 28, 1961. 



Report of Board in Dispute Between 

The Commercial Cable Company 

and 

Seafarers' International Union of Canada 



In the matter of a dispute between The 
Commercial Cable Company (SS Cable 
Guardian) (unlicensed personnel) and The 
Commercial Cable Company (SS Cable 
Guardian) (licensed engineers), and the 
Seafarers' International Union of Canada: a 
Board of Conciliation and Investigation was 
appointed on August 21, 1961, to endeavour 
to bring about agreement between the par- 
ties to said dispute. On September 20, 1961, 
the members of the Board were appointed: 



Errol K. McDougall, Q.C., for the Com- 
pany; Jean C. Lariviere, for the union; and 
G. D. LaViolette, Chairman. The docu- 
ments pertinent to the litigation were re- 
ceived at the offices of the Chairman on 
September 26, 1961. 

A — The Demands 

1. For the Unlicensed Personnel 

A series of demands made by the Union 
as proposed amendments, additions, and 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



57 



During November, the Minister of Labour 
received the Report of the Board of Con- 
ciliation and Investigation established to 
deal with a dispute between the Seafarers' 
International Union of Canada and The 
Commercial Cable Company. 

The Board was under the chairmanship of 
G. D. LaViolette of Montreal. He was 
appointed by the Minister in the absence 
of a joint recommendation from the other 
two members, Errol K. McDougall, Q.C., 
and Jean G. Lariviere, both of Montreal, 
nominee of the company and union, respec- 
tively. 

The majority report, which under the 
provisions of the Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act constitutes the 
Report of the Board, was submitted by the 
Chairman and Mr. McDougall. The minority 
report was submitted by Mr. Lariviere. 

The majority and minority reports are 
reproduced here. 



revision of the Agreement expired June 30, 
1961, filed with the Board as Exhibit "A", 
covering the following items: 

Wage Increase, 

Overtime, 

Hours of Work, 

Temporary Promotions, 

Statutory Holidays, 

Shore Leave, 

Marine Disaster, 

Welfare Plan, 

Meals and Coffee Time, 

Deck Department, 

Engine Department, and 

Stewards Department. 

The number of employees involved is 55. 

2. For the Licensed Division 

The Union was certified for this Division 
by the Canada Labour Relations Board on 
May 4, 1961. As there is no contract in 
force, it has submitted a proposal in the 
form of an Agreement which has been filed 
with the Board as Exhibit "B". This Agree- 
ment includes a preamble, and a number of 
clauses covering: 

General Purpose of the Agreement, 

Recognition, 

Strikes and Lockouts, 

Employment, 

Conditions of Employment, 

Deduction of Union Dues, 

Promotions, 

Character of Work, 

Hours of Work, 

Rates of Pay, 

Security Watches, 

Annual Holidays, 

Stand-by Wages, 

Transfers between Vessels, 

Holidays, 

Conditions for Marine Officers in Port, 

Accommodation, 

Vessels out of Commission, 



Repatriation, 
Sick Benefits, 
Welfare Plan, 
Marine Disaster, 
Change of Name, 
Affiliation or Ownership, 
Clause Paramount, 
Boarding Passes, 
Grievance Procedure, 
Arbitration, 
School Plan, and 
Duration of Agreement. 

The number of employees involved is 4. 

Representations have been made to the 
Board by both parties, mainly as to the 
demands for the unlicensed personnel and 
some representation as to the Agreement 
for the Licensed Division. However, all 
conciliation efforts of the Board failed 
because of a very particular situation out- 
lined hereafter. 

B — Cessation of Operations 

The Company has discontinued cable 
service repair out of Canada by any cable 
ship. They have found other means to carry 
on their business, and the ship Cable Guar- 
dian is no more in operation here; she has 
replaced the All America in the Panama 
Canal Zone, and her crew has been re- 
patriated to Halifax on September 23 last. 
As of that date, the Commercial Cable 
Company has no cable repair ship by 
ownership or charter, and no crew. It 
therefore becomes academical to discuss 
conditions of a new Agreement and as 
well amendments to an existing Agreement, 
when there is no ship in service and con- 
sequently no workers in the service of the 
Company. 

Cessation of operations or substitution 
of a mode of operation for another is the 
privilege of the Company and if it is not, 
the issue is not before this Board for 
investigation or conciliation. 

C — Study of the Problem 

In the first instance, for the unlicensed 
personnel, the contract expired on June 
30, 1961; it has not been renewed. In 
the second instance, for the Licensed Divi- 
sion, there is no contract, no understanding 
having been reached as to the Contract 
presented to the Company for negotiation 
on June 19, 1961. The dispute for both 
cases is therefore submitted to the Board 
for investigation and conciliation. 

In the first instance, the unlicensed per- 
sonnel worked with a contract up to June 
30, 1961, and without one up to the date 
of repatriation to Halifax, September 23, 



58 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



1961. In the Licensed Division the person- 
nel worked without a Contract until that 
same date of repatriation to Halifax, Sep- 
tember 23, 1961. 

Going over the record and checking on 
the representations made by the parties, it 
is found that, on July 6, 1961, the Com- 
pany proposed to the Union a two-year 
agreement including an immediate 3% in- 
crease across the board and an additional 
3% for the second year of the Agreement 
with no change in working hours, for the 
unlicensed personnel. The Union refused 
the offer and introduced the following 
counter-proposal: a two-year contract with 
an immediate increase of 5% for the first 
year; an additional increase of 5% for the 
second year, plus a reduction in working 
hours from 56 to 48 hours during the first 
year, and from 48 to 40 hours during the 
second year of the Agreement. This counter- 
proposal of the Union was turned down by 
the Company. 

The same offer was made for the Licensed 
Division, and the same counter-proposal 
was submitted by the Union and turned 
down by the Company. 

D — Recommendation of the Board 

Due to the fact that there are no workers 
and no ship after September 23, 1961, 
operations having terminated on that date, 
a contract agreement becomes meaningless 
from a practical standpoint. Taking in con- 
sideration the period worked up to Septem- 
ber 23rd, 1961, the Board recommends an 
increase of four per cent (4%) to the 
personnel of both the Unlicensed and Li- 
censed Division, for the hours worked from 
July 1, 1961, up to termination of opera- 
tions, September 23, 1961. 

The recommendation of the Board is a 
majority decision, the Union Nominee dis- 
senting. Mr. Jean G. Lariviere, who repre- 
sents the Union, will file a separate Report. 

And we have signed at Montreal on this 
23rd day of November 1961. 

(Sgd.) G. C. LaViolette, 

Chairman. 
(Sgd.) Errol K. McDougall, 
Member. 

MINORITY REPORT 

The following is the report of J. G. 
Lariviere Board Member. 

The Board consisted of G. D. LaViolette 
Industrial Adviser of Montreal, as Chair- 
man, Errol K. McDougall, Q.C., repre- 
senting the Company, Jean G. Lariviere 
representing the Union. 

The sittings were held in the City of 
Montreal. 



A very particular situation exists in the 
present case. The Union is the duly certified 
bargaining agent for the employees of the 
said SS Cable Guardian. The Company 
claims it has sold the SS Cable Guardian. 
However, it is my opinion that the Com- 
pany has not sold but transferred the said 
vessel to another Company or subsidiary 
Company and this possibly due to the said 
negotiations and to avoid the effect of a 
labour contract. 

Again in my opinion the Company is 
using a subterfuge to evade the effect of 
a labour contract and therefore my recom- 
mendation is that the demands presented 
by the Union be the ones awarded and they 
are as follows: 

For the unlicensed Personnel as per 
appendix "A" of the Union. 

1 — For the Unlicensed Personnel 

Wage Increase 

Overtime 

Hours of Work 

Temporary Promotions 

Statutory Holidays 

Shore Leave 

Marine Disaster 

Welfare Plan 

Meals and Coffee Time 

Deck Department 

Engine Department, and 

Stewards Department 

For the licensed Division as per appen- 
dix "B" of the Union. 

2 — For the Licensed Division 

General Purpose of the Agreement 

Recognition 

Strikes and Lockouts 

Employment 

Conditions of Employment 

Deduction of Union dues 

Promotions 

Character of Work 

Hours of Work 

Rates of Pay 

Security Watches 

Annual Holidays 

Standby Wages 

Transfers between Vessels 

Holidays 

Conditions for Marine Officers in Port 

Accommodation 

Vessels out of Commission 

Repatriation 

Sick Benefits 

Welfare Plan 

Marine Disaster 

Change of Name 

Affiliation or Ownership 

Clause Paramount 

Boarding Passes 

Grievance Procedure 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



59 



Arbitration 
School Plan, and 
Duration of Agreement 

Duration of Agreement 

This agreement shall remain in force for 
the period from the date hereof until June 
1962, and shall be subject to renewal from 
year to year thereafter in its present form, 
unless written notice of desire to amend, 
modify or cancel any portion of any of 
the terms hereof is given by either party 
to the other within sixty (60) days prior 
to the expiration of any such annual period, 
and such modification or cancellation of 



any portion of or any of the terms have 
not been agreed upon in writing between the 
Company and the Seafarers' International 
Union of Canada. 

Again it is my recommendation that this 
award be for a period of one year in 
accordance to law and that such an attempt 
to evade a labour contract be made impos- 
sible in order to maintain our labour laws 
and practices and also to protect our Cana- 
dian economy for the future. 

The whole respectfully submitted, 
(Sgd.) Jean G. Lariviere, 
Member. 

Montreal, November 27th, 1961. 



Report of Board in Dispute between 

Quebec Paper Sales and Transportation Company Limited 

and 

Seafarers' International Union of North America 



The Dispute 

The Company made a proposal to the 
Union on May 11, 1961, and confirmed 
same by letter the following day. In this 
proposal, the Company's offer is as follows: 

1. Term of Agreement: A three-year 
Contract; 

2. Wages: A general wage increase to 
licensed and unlicensed personnel of three 
per cent (3%) of present wages in each 
of the years 1961, 1962 and 1963; 

3. Compensation Payment for Wages on 
Statutory Holidays: Delete St-Jean-Baptiste 
and All-Saints' Day and substitute therefore 
Christmas and New Year's Day. A flat pay- 



During November, the Minister of Labour 
received the Report of the Board of Con- 
ciliation and Investigation established to 
deal with a dispute between Quebec Paper 
Sales and Transportation Company Limited, 
Donnacona, Que., and the Seafarers' Inter- 
national Union of North America, Canadian 
District. 

The Board was under the chairmanship 
of G. D. LaViolette of Montreal. He was 
appointed by the Minister in the absence 
of a joint recommendation from the other 
two members, Marcel Belanger, C.A., Que- 
bec City, and Jean G. Lariviere, Montreal, 
nominees of the company and union, respec- 
tively. 

The majority report, which under the 
provisions of the Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act, constitutes the 
Report of the Board, was submitted by the 
Chairman and Mr. Belanger. The minority 
report was submitted by Mr. Lariviere. 

The majority and minority Reports are 
reproduced here. 



ment to personnel who work for a full two 
(2) watches on statutory holidays, as 
follows: 

Sailors and Cooks ....$3.00 per holiday 
Assistant Engineers $4.00 per holiday 

Mates $4.00 per holiday 

Chief Engineers $5.00 per holiday 

4. Vacation Pay: (a) An employee who 
is discharged for cause or who quits during 
the navigation season shall be paid vacation 
pay in accordance with the Annual Vaca- 
tions' Act, Chapter 24, Statutes of Canada, 
1958; (b) Vacation pay shall be remitted 
to the SIU Vacation Pay Fund. 

The Union flatly refused to discuss the 
Company's offer unless the Company 
accepted to provide for the limitation of 
weekly and daily working hours. This the 
Company refused to do and the matter was 
deadlocked in negotiations and, as well, in 
conciliation. No change of attitude has taken 
place since, in spite of our efforts to con- 
ciliate the dispute. The Union is adamant on 
this point of limitation of weekly and daily 
working hours. 

Previous Reference 

This matter of limitation of weekly and 
daily working hours is not a new one. It 
was dealt with very particularly, on July 13, 
1956, in a report made to the Honourable 
Minister of Labour, covering demands made 
by the Union and submitted to a Board of 
Conciliation and Investigation presided over 
by Honourable Judge Paul E. Cote, through 



60 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



the following award: The Chairman and 
the union nominee were in agreement as 
to a general increase of $75 per month to 
the unlicensed personnel for the current 
season, and an additional 10-per-cent in- 
crease for the 1957 season, on the basis of 
a 7-day, 8 hours a day, work week, and that 
an overtime premium payment of 42 cents 
an hour be paid to each man for work per- 
formed beyond the regular time. The Com- 
pany nominee dissenting. 

In post-Board negotiations a settlement 
was reached between the parties on the basis 
of $100 per month, the additional $25 being 
in lieu of the award recommendation of 
10 per cent in 1957, and the overtime 
recommendation. Through that particular 
settlement, the limitation of weekly and 
daily working hours was disposed of to the 
satisfaction of both parties. 

On July 31, 1958, another report was 
made by a Board of Conciliation and Inves- 
tigation under the chairmanship of Mr. H. 
Carl Goldenberg, Q.C., and this same ques- 
tion of limitation of working hours daily 
and weekly was again one of the demands 
of the Union. The Board made a very 
thorough study of the problem and their 
findings are worth noting as being relevant 
to the present case. We quote: 

1. Hours of Work 

The Union demands a normal work week 
of five days of eight hours each, Monday 
through Friday, and compensatory payment for 
all hours worked in excess of forty hours per 
week. The Employers submit that the nature 
of their operation makes it physically impos- 
sible to inaugurate a regular forty hour week. 
Since neither party was prepared to recede 
from its position, the door was closed to dis- 
cussion of an alternative basis. 

Having considered the representations of the 
parties, the Board finds that the industry is a 
seasonal one having some seven months of the 
year in which navigation can be safely con- 
ducted, and that it appears to be impossible 
for an owner to schedule his operation in such 
a way to reproduce conditions of shore em- 
ployment to which a 5-day 40-hour week can 
be effectively applied. The Board has sought 
a solution to this problem but has failed to 
find any. 

Considering the foregoing, the Board finds 
that it cannot approve the Union's demand. 
However, since the employees, owing to the 
nature of the employment which they have 
voluntarily chosen, are not in a position to 
enjoy some of the benefits available to em- 
ployees in other industries, the Board is of 
the opinion that they are entitled to a com- 
pensatory payment in lieu thereof. Accordingly, 
the Board recommends as follows: "All em- 
ployees covered by the agreement between the 
parties shall be entitled to receive 21 days' 
basic pay in lieu of vacation, instead of 
14 days as provided in clause 8 of the last 
agreement, and that for shorter periods of 
service they shall receive a pro rata payment." 

The above award is a unanimous decision 
of the Board. 



On the question of wages the Board 
awarded an increase of 5%, retroactive to 
the beginning of the 1958 navigation season, 
and 4% additional at the beginning of the 
1959 navigation season. The Employers' 
representative dissented from this recom- 
mendation. 

In post-Board negotiations settlement was 
reached on the basis of a three-year agree- 
ment with a general wage increase of 5% 
in 1958 and 5% in 1959, an additional 1% 
above the Board's wage recommendation, 
in lieu of a change in vacation benefits. This 
change in vacation benefits was an indemnity 
awarded due to the impossibility of regula- 
ting daily and weekly hours. Again, in the 
post-Board settlement, this question of limi- 
tation of working hours was exchanged for 
a wage increase and disposed of to the satis- 
faction of both parties. 

It is to be noted that in the first award 
on this question of limitation of hours, the 
decision was a majority decision: the chair- 
man, Honourable Judge Paul E. Cote, and 
the Union nominee, Mr. Louis Laberge. The 
Company nominee, Mr. Marcel Belanger, 
C.A., dissenting. In the second and subse- 
quent award on this same subject of limita- 
tion of hours, the decision was unanimous: 
the Chairman, Mr. H. Carl Goldenberg, 
Q.C., the Union nominee, Mr. Bernard 
Boulanger, and the Company nominee, Mr. 
Marcel Belanger, C.A. 

Our Study of the Problem 

This problem of working hours is again 
before us. Both parties have submitted ela- 
borate memorandums outlining in detail 
their case, and the arguments put forward 
by each of them at the hearings have been 
closely studied. The memorandum of the 
Union is highly informative, very interesting 
indeed, but a good part of it has to be dis- 
counted, as it presupposes that the Company 
has pleaded "inability to pay" in the sense 
that "it has no funds to pay for Union 
demands." This is not a fact. The Company 
has plainly stated that the operation of the 
ships is an economic problem; if costs are 
raised to a point where it becomes more 
economical to use rail or truck, or a com- 
bination of both (or even a "goellette"), it 
may do so. 

The Union claims this is a threat, and that 
it does not need to be given credence. Their 
claim is somewhat correct; if it is not a 
threat, at least it is a very direct warning, 
and the Union is perfectly free to believe or 
not that it may be implemented. However, 
threat or warning, it is based on economic 
factors relevant to the business carried on. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



61 



Situations which impel substituting a form 
of operation for another are common occur- 
rence, automation for instance. Unfor- 
tunately, it is disturbing to some and the 
problem is how to cushion off its effects. 
But from a practical standpoint, when such 
radical changes are applied whether as a 
threat, a warning or otherwise, the results 
are the same. In this particular instance, 
who can stop the Company from deciding 
at what point it shall discontinue a deficit 
operation? 

In the memorandum of the Union we find, 
on pages 3 and 4, the following: 

In assessing the impact of these facts it is 
a duty upon the Board to consider that these 
employees are not in a position to obtain 
cheaper expenses in the form of rents, groceries, 
fuel bills, clothing, etc. The economy of 
Quebec cannot and will not adjust itself to the 
wages of the employees of Quebec Paper Sales 
& Transportation Company, Limited, in Donna- 
cona, Quebec, or any other place, rather the 
employees and to that extent the employer are 
bound to provide wages which will fit the 
obligations of the economy. 

The employees approach the coming con- 
tractual period with foreboding. Because the 
issues to be resolved are not issues of prestige, 
pecuniary advantage for skills but are instead 
those basic issues of a roof overhead, warm 
clothing and food for the families involved. 

The above are high sounding words and 
we believe it is correct to say "gross exag- 
geration." If the offer of the Company was 
acepted, a sailor on the Company's boats, 
a man who is not required to know how to 
read or write and who can learn his trade 
in an hour or so, would earn $303.84 a 
month for the navigation season now prac- 
tically finished, plus free board. That is a 
fair wage for such qualifications in the 
Province of Quebec, and even in the Domin- 
ion of Canada. 

True, it may be argued that it is not the 
correct wage of the occupation or that the 
worker wants more, a legitimate aspiration, 
but when it comes to a living wage, this 
particular man earns a monthly salary which 
compares favourably with the average 
monthly wage paid to all workers engaged 
in industry, in the Province of Quebec and 
even in the Dominion. A good many indus- 
tries pay less and few others pay more. Also 
the wage structure varies from province to 
province; British Columbia, for instance, has 
a high monthly average, and Nova Scotia, 
a low one. 

To be fair with the Union, it must be 
stated that a monthly wage comparison is 
not acceptable to them unless it is based on 
the number of hours worked. In other words, 
the Union is particularly interested in what 
the man in his occupation earns per hour; 
this is their gauge. We will have something 
to say on this subject later on. 



The record of negotiations from the start 
is a pattern from which the Union has 
refused to budge. This pattern is: you must 
accept to discuss limitation of working 
hours, otherwise all further discussion is 
useless. This attitude does not check with 
the statement of the Union on page 4 of 
their brief, which reads as follows: "The 
employees approach the coming contractual 
period with foreboding. Because the issues 
to be resolved are not issues of prestige, 
pecuniary advantage for skills but are 
instead those basic issues of a roof overhead, 
warm clothing and food for the families 
involved." 

It is obvious that no negotiations have 
taken place yet on that basis. 

On pages 7 and 8 of the memorandum of 
the Union, comparisons are made for a deck 
hand working for the St. Charles Transpor- 
tation Co. Ltd., and one for Quebec Paper 
Sales and Transportation Co. Ltd., for 1958, 
1959 and 1960. But, in 1958 the Union 
signed a three-year agreement with "Quebec 
Paper" providing for specific wages at 
specific dates. Surely the agreement was 
satisfactory to both parties and the matter, 
up to 1960 inclusively, was thus disposed of. 
Why, therefore, the comparisons for 1958, 
1959 and 1960? 

The Big Argument 

The Union insists that a sailor is a sailor, 
no matter on what class of boat he is 
operating. They demand that the personnel 
on the "Quebec Paper" boats be subject to 
the same working conditions and wages as 
those of the lake boats. From the Union 
standpoint, sailors on both ships perform 
the same operation and there is no reason 
why one should work 8 hours a day and 
the other 12, and why one should get wages 
of so much, and the other less. Hence the 
standard that should apply is that of the 
lakers. 

The Company operates five vessels: three 
carrying newsprint from Donnacona to New 
York and two, pulp from Sault-au-Mouton 
and Bersimis to Donnacona. 17 men are 
involved (unlicensed personnel). 

Prior to 1959, seven vessels, were used, 
and three others leased from the Davies 
Transportation Company Limited on the 
Chambly Canal Run. In 1959 the Company 
disposed of two of its pulp vessels and at 
the end of the 1960 sailing season, dispensed 
with the services of the Davies Transporta- 
tion Co. vessels. This record shows a declin- 
ing operation. As a matter of fact, the Com- 
pany claims it is a marginal operation and 
the Union has accepted this fact. 



62 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



Now the question: Should these men 
work on a three-watch system (8 hours a 
day) and be paid the same wages as the 
men on the lake ships? This, on the basis 
that they perform a similar operation and 
that there is no reason to make of them 
second class men or men of an inferior 
class, as far as working conditions and 
wages apply? The Union's answer: same 
conditions and wages as the lake ships. 

The Board has considered the arguments 
submitted as to this demand, and it finds 
that working conditions on the "Quebec 
Paper" boats are very different from those 
on the lakers. For instance: 

On the "Quebec Paper" boats: 

— A sailor does not need to read or write; 

— The cook does not need to read or 
write; 

— A sailor has nothing to do with load- 
ing or unloading; 

— A sailor has a continuous operation 
for three days (72 hours) at a time, at the 
most, for the newsprint ships, as the trip 
between New York and Donnacona is about 
65 hours; or 

— A sailor has a continuous operation 
for one day (24 hours) at a time, at the 
most, for the pulp ships, as the trip between 
Sault-au-Mouton or Bersimis, and Donna- 
sona is about 23 hours; 

— A sailor is not on a captive ship, in 
fact has lots of free time; the period of 
navigation is about 1\ months. 

On a laker: 

— A sailor must have an average educa- 
tion; 

— The cook must know how to read and 
write; 

— A sailor must attend to loading and 
unloading at any day, or at night; 

— A sailor has a continuous seven-day 
operation; 

— A sailor is on a captive ship for a 
period of about nine months. 

On the "Quebec Paper" boats they have 
a problem of tide, which means inactivity 
for the ship. Only in exceptional circum- 
stances would there be such a problem for 
the laker. 

On the problem of hours: 

The Union complains bitterly of the fact 
that a sailor on the "Quebec Paper" boats 
has a work-day of 12 hours and a work 
week of 84. This in contrast with the lakers, 
where the work-day is eight hours and the 
work week, 40 hours. This is correct up 
to a point only. 



The season on the "Quebec Paper" boats 
is about 7i months, or about 225 days. Dur- 
ing the season the newsprint ships make 19 
trips to New York, practically 6 days go 
and return, which means navigating for 
114 days. The pulp ships make 50 trips to 
Sault-au-Mouton or Bersimis, practically 
two days go and return, which means navi- 
gating for about 100 days. The rest of the 
time the ships are idle in port either at 
Donnacona, New York, Sault-au-Mouton 
or Bersimis. So that the personnel has 
considerable free time and moreover, has 
the opportunity to be home very often, as 
this personnel is recruited in the vicinity 
of Donnacona. As a rule, they are recom- 
mended by the Captain and very often 
related to each other. 

On a lake ship they have continuous 
operation for seven days, whilst on the 
"Quebec Paper" boats continuous operation 
is at the most three days, plus those hours 
which one person or the other may make 
when required to stay on when the ship is in 
port. And this they can rotate amongst them- 
selves. It is possible that 84 hours may be 
worked in one week but — not very often. 

If the "Quebec Paper" boats were to 
operate as the lakers, on the three-watch 
system, they would need additional person- 
nel and they have no room for it on the 
ships. It is a physical impossibility. 

The job has some appeal to most of those 
engaged in the service. If we look over the 
seniority list, we find that in the unlicensed 
personnel the years of service are from 1 to 
13, and in the licensed personnel from 1 to 
34. 

Moreover, in the present arbitration and 
as well in the previous two arbitrations, the 
Board understands that never at any time 
did the Union bring a man or men serving 
on those ships as witnesses to confirm the 
complaints now made on hours of work, or 
anything else. This the Union is not obliged 
to do; it may carry on its case as it sees 
fit, but in a number of arbitrations I as 
Chairman am conversant with, such a 
procedure has been followed by the Union 
involved. 

In the two arbitrations referred to 
previously in this Report, this same question 
of limitation of working hours has been 
traded for an increase in wages. The prob- 
lem is, as was mentioned at the hearings, 
how often must it be traded That is 
something to be noted in the present 
investigation. 

Conclusion 

Summing up what has been outlined 
heretofore and other facts submitted, 
relevant to the problem now under study, 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



63 



such as the nature of the business and its 
financial return, the Board rejects the 
demand of the Union for an 8-hour day 
and 40-hour week and overtime after, and 
recommends the offer made by the Com- 
pany to the Union on May 11, 1961, con- 
firmed by letter the following day, as 
detailed on page 1 of the present Report, 
under the heading "The Dispute". This 
offer covers four points: 

1. Term of agreement; 

2. Wages; 

3. Compensatory payment for work on 
statutory holidays; and 

4. Vacation pay. 

This recommendation of the Board is a 
majority decision: the Chairman and the 
Member representing the Company. The 
Member representing the Union is dissident. 
Mr. Jean G. Lariviere, representing the 
Union, will file a separate Report. 

AND WE HAVE SIGNED: 

On this 16th day of November 1961, in 
Montreal, Quebec. 

(Sgd.) G. D. LaViolette, 

Chairman. 

On this 18th day of November 1961, in 
Quebec, Que. 

(Sgd.) Marcel Belanger, C.A., 

Member. 

MINORITY REPORT 

For the following reason I find it impos- 
sible to agree with the Company's argu- 
ment or that of my two colleagues on the 
Board (that hours of service can't be estab- 
lished for the vessels subject in these 
proceedings). Hours of work in all 
industries that I am aware of are regulated 
to a certain degree and due to this most 
important reason it is impossible for me 
to make any other recommendations than 
those following: 

8. Vacation Pay 

(a) An employee shall be entitled to 
receive fourteen (14) days' pay (in lieu of 
vacation), provided he serves continuously 
aboard ship from the time of Spring fit-out 
to the completion of lay-up in the Fall, or 
has been absent for reasons satisfactory to 
the Master. 

(b) For shorter periods of service all 
employees shall receive a pro rata payment 
for each day of service on the basis of 
fourteen (14) days' pay for 270 days' 
service, or 14/270ths of the basic daily 
rate for each day of service as set out in the 
Vacation Pay column in paragraph 18 of 
this agreement. 



(c) The Company shall remit the vaca- 
tion pay of its employees to the SIU Vaca- 
tion Pay Fund once each month. The basis 
for payment shall be fourteen (14) days' 
par for 270 days' service or 14/270ths of 
the basic daily rate for each payroll day. 

Employees shall be paid vacation pay at 
any time through the offices of the Union 
upon documentary evidence of days on the 
company payroll. 

10. Statutory Holidays 
The Company agrees to recognize the 
following holidays: 

1. New Year's Day 

2. Good Friday 

3. Dominion Day 

4. Queen's Birthday 

5. Labour Day 

6. Remembrance Day 

7. Thanksgiving Day 

8. Christmas Day 

In the event that any of the foregoing 
holidays falls on a Sunday, the following 
Monday will be observed as the holiday. 
When the vessel is on the run the work 
performed on a holiday shall be that usually 
performed on a Sunday. It is agreed that 
as of the date of signing, statutory holidays 
will be paid to the termination of the con- 
tract at the same rate as now paid for Sun- 
day work, and in the case of a statutory 
holiday falling on a Saturday or a Sunday, 
the following Monday will be celebrated 
and paid for as the statutory holiday, pro- 
viding of course that in all cases of statu- 
tory holiday pay the employee does actually 
work. If the employee does not work on a 
statutory holiday, he will receive his usual 
daily wage. 

17. Tank Cleaning 

When employees are required to clean 
tanks, those on duty shall be paid over- 
time at the regular overtime rate, and 
those off duty shall receive time and one- 
half thereof for the same work. Addi- 
tionally, employees entering fresh water 
tanks for the purpose of cleaning shall 
receive the same pay as above. 

18. Schedule of Monthly Wages 

The scale of wages in effect during the 
term of this contract from December 1, 
1960 to November 30, 1961, is as follows: 

VACATION 

Based 

Over- on 270 

Per time days 

30 day Per Per maxi- Per 

Month Day hour mum Day 

Sailors— $329.00 $10.96 $1.85 $153.44 .57 

Cooks— $465.96 $15.54 $2.32 $217.56 .82 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



19. Hours of Work (48-hour week) 
(44-hour week) 
It is agreed that the normal work week 
shall be of six (6) days of eight (8) -hours 
per day, Monday through Saturday, until 
the completion of lay-up for the 1960 sea- 
son. At the commencement of fit-out for the 
1961 season the normal work week shall 
be of five and one-half (5i) days of eight 
(8) hours per day, Monday through Friday, 
and four (4) hours on Saturday. In con- 
sideration of the fact that the operation of 
a ship may necessitate men working in 
excess of the normal work week of forty- 
eight (48) hours, or of forty-four (44) 
hours, there shall be paid to those whose 
normal work exceeds the same, compensa- 
tory payments as set out in Schedule "A" 
of this agreement on the basis of time and 
one-half the basic daily rate; providing 
always that when work on a Saturday or 
Sunday exceeds eight (8) hours, employees 
shall be paid the regular overtime rate for 
work exceeding their regular eight (8) 
hours. 

(a) The regular hours of work for deck- 
hands shall be eight (8) hours per day 
during each day of the calendar month. 
Such regular hours may be worked on Mon- 
day through Friday in a spread of sixteen 
(16) hours from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 mid- 
night. On Saturdays and Sundays the regular 
hours shall be worked between 8:00 a.m. 
and 5:00 p.m. 

(b) The regular hours of work for cooks, 
second cooks, messmen and porters shall be 
eight (8) hours during each day of the 
calendar month in a spread of twelve (12) 
hours as determined by the Master from 
time to time. 

(c) The regular hours of work for all 
other employees shall be eight (8) hours 
during each day of the calendar month on 
a three (3) watch system so that four (4) 
hours on watch shall be followed by eight 
(8) hours off watch, except where in the 
Master's or Chief Engineer's discretion it 
is deemed advisable to break watches while 
the vessel is in port, anchored, or not other- 
wise underway. When watches are so broken 
and "day work" is undertaken, the hours 
shall be 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., no employee 
shall be called upon to work for more than 
eight (8) hours during such day without 
payment of overtime, taking into considera- 
tion watches which he has stood before "day 
work" commenced or which he will stand 
after completion of "day work". 

(d) Should an employee fail to report at 
his regular post at the beginning of his 
watch, his mate on the preceding watch 
shall remain at his post until a substitute is 
secured, and if necessary he shall work the 



extra watch for which he shall be paid for 
the extra time worked at the regular basic 
rate of wages at the expense of the missing 
employee. 

(e) When a vessel sails without full com- 
plement, wages of the absent members shall 
be divided among the men who must per- 
form the work of the absent member at the 
regular basic rate of wages only. 

(f) When men standing sea watches are 
promoted for the purpose of replacing men 
who are injured, sick or absent, they shall 
receive the differential in pay while so 
acting. 

(g) For the purpose of this agreement, 
between the hours of 8:00 a.m. Saturday 
and 8:00 a.m. Monday, and between 6:00 
p.m. and 8:00 a.m. weekdays, all ratings 
shall perform only their routine operational 
duties. During these periods operational 
duties shall not include chipping, scraping, 
scaling and painting. 

Whenever possible, and the vessel is in 
port, Sunday shall be given off. 

Every consideration shall be given un- 
licensed personnel in requests for time off 
in port for the purpose of obtaining medical 
care, legal counsel or necessaries of life. 

20. Overtime and Overtime Payments 

Overtime rates per hour for chief cooks, 
boatswains, wheelsmen, able seamen, elec- 
tricians, crane operators, pumpmen, cargo 
operators, scrapermen, head tunnelmen, and 
oilers shall be $2.32 per hour. All other 
classifications in this agreement shall receive 
$1.85 per overtime hour. 

Overtime shall be paid on the basis of 
the foregoing rates for work performed 
beyond the regular hours of work for the 
respective classifications as defined in 
Article 19 hereof, except as provided in 
Article 9 (b) and (c) hereof. 

(a) An employee who is not on regular 
duty when called for overtime work shall 
be allowed fifteen (15) minutes in which to 
dress. 

(b) An employee performing overtime 
work which ceases before the expiration of 
one (1) hour shall nevertheless be credited 
with one (1) hour's overtime. 

(c) After the first hour of overtime each 
further period of one-half (i) hour shall 
entitle the employee to one-half (i) the 
hourly overtime rate. 

(d) When men are called out to work on 
overtime and then "knocked off" for less 
than two (2) hours, excepting where a man 
is recalled for his regular duties, overtime 
shall be paid straight through. 

(e) At the completion of any overtime 
work the employee and the officer in charge 
shall both sign duplicate overtime sheets, 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 

52905-7—5 



65 



recording the duration of such work, which 
shall be countersigned and approved by the 
Master. One (1) copy of the sheet shall be 
given the employee and the other retained 
by the Master. 

25. Welfare Plan 

The Company agrees to continue welfare 
contributions of twenty cents (.20) per man 
per day, under the existing welfare plan. 

26. Duration of Agreement 

This agreement shall remain in force for 
a period from December 1, 1960 until 
November 30, 1961, and shall be subject 
to renewal from year to year thereafter in 
its present form, unless written notice of 
desire to amend, modify or cancel any por- 
tion of any of the terms hereof is given by 
either party to the other within sixty (60) 
days prior to the expiration of any such 
annual period, and such modification or 



cancellation of any portion of or any of the 
terms have not been agreed upon in writing 
between the parties hereto. 

SCHEDULE "A" 

Compensatory Rates per Hour for 
Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays 

Sailors Cooks 

h hr 34 .48 

1 hr 68 .97 

2 hrs 1.37 1.94 

3 hrs 2.05 2.91 

4 hrs 2.74 3.88 

5 hrs 3.42 4.85 

6 hrs 4.11 5.83 

7 hrs 4.79 6.80 

8 hrs 5.48 7.77 

The whole respectfully submitted, 

(Sgd.) Jean Lariviere, 
Member. 

Montreal, November the 24th, 1961. 



Report of Board in Dispute Between 

Federal Commerce & Navigation Company Limited 

and 

Seafarers' International Union of North America 



This is the decision of the Board con- 
stituted by the Minister of Labour on 
June 13, 1961. 

The Board comprised A. Stuart Hyndman, 
representing the Company, Jean G. Lari- 
viere, representing the Union, and was pre- 
sided over by Rene Lippe, District Judge 
of the Magistrate's Court of the Province of 
Quebec. 

The sittings were held in the Court House 
in Montreal. 



During November, the Minister of Labour 
received the Report of the Board of Con- 
ciliation and Investigation established to 
deal with a dispute between the Seafarers' 
International Union of North America, 
Canadian District, and Federal Commerce 
& Navigation Company Limited, Montreal. 

The Board was under the chairmanship 
of His Honour Judge Rene Lippe of Mont- 
real. He was appointed by the Minister in 
the absence of a joint recommendation from 
the other two members, A. Stuart Hyndman 
and Jean G. Lariviere, both of Montreal, 
nominees of the company and union, respec- 
tively. 

The Report was signed by all three 
members but contains the majority and 
minority recommendations. 

The Report is reproduced here. 



The dispute arises from the request of 
the Union to negotiate a revision of the 
terms of the Collective Agreement relating 
to wages. The Agreement is a three-year-old 
contract, providing for a wage re-opening 
period, terminating January 12, 1961. 

The Union has reopened negotiations in 
accordance with the Agreement for the 
revision of sections 1 and 4 of Article 3. 

The authority of this Board to negotiate 
this dispute arises from Article 13 of the 
Collective Agreement. 

Article XIII — Duration of Agreement 

This Agreement shall remain in force for 
the period from the date hereof until January 
12th, 1963; provided, however, if either party 
hereto shall give written notice to the other 
party hereto at any time during the last sixty 
days of the first year of this contract terminat- 
ing May 25th, 1961, the party giving such 
notice may require such other party to com- 
mence collective bargaining with the view to the 
revision of the figures set out in Section 1 
and 4 of Article III hereof, in which event this 
agreement shall be subject to revision in respect 
of such figures, but not otherwise, and any 
such revision agreed to by the parties hereto 
shall apply only to the year or years follow- 
ing the year in which such notice was so 
given. 



66 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



The Union has demanded a revision of 
the Agreement itself. In other words, the 
Union is asking for a wage increase and 
a wage differential for voyages made within 
the Great Lakes, which is commonly called 
"Lake Differential". 

The Company has taken exception to the 
Union's statement, relating to both a Lakes 
differential and an increase in wages. 

The Company claims that the Union is 
attempting to revise a basic condition of 
the Agreement by demanding now that 
instead of one set of wages, there would 
be two sets of wages depending on the 
trades engaged in by the Company. Fur- 
thermore the Company claims that the 
wages paid to the employees are relatively 
high and compare favourably with wages 
paid by the industry at large. 

At the time of the signing of the Agree- 
ment, the Company was the owner and 
operator of two vessels, Federal Pioneer and 
Federal Voyager. One of the vessels has 
been sold since and the Company is now 
operating only the Federal Voyager. 

Lakes Differential 

It is the opinion of this Board that the 
wording of the wages re-opener clause 
(Article 13) is such that it enables the 
Union to negotiate two sets of wages 
depending on the trades engaged in by the 
Company. 

This is a majority decision of this Board, 
Mr. A. Stuart Hyndman, Company nominee, 
dissenting. 

Wages 

The members of this Board have given 
a very serious consideration to this question 
of the Union's demand for increased wages. 
Particularly the members have examined 
the Collective Labour Agreement in force 
between the same Union and the owners and 
operators of other comparable vessels. 

This Board has been impressed by an 
Agreement signed a few days ago, between 
the same Union and the owners and opera- 
tors of the two vessels, M.V. West River 
and M.V. Alexander T. Wood, in which the 
parties agreed to an increase of 7% of 
the basic scale. However the proof has 
revealed that the M.V. Alexander T. Wood 
and the M.V. West River are bigger vessels 
built for the carriage of bulk commodities 
while the Federal Pioneer is unsuitable for 
the carriage of coal or ore, or other bulk 
commodities as returning cargoes into the 
Lakes. 

In view of this difference, it is the opinion 
of this Board that a general over-all in- 
crease of 5% should be added to the basic 
scale. 



This is a majority decision of this Board, 
Mr. Jean G. Lariviere, Union nominee, 
dissenting. 

This Board, under reserve of the dissent- 
ing decision of Mr. Hyndman, Company 
nominee, on the Lakes Differential and 
under reserve of the dissenting decision of 
Mr. Lariviere, Union nominee, on the in- 
crease in wages, recommends that the 
two following clauses of the Agreement 
signed between the same Union and the 
operators of M.V. Alexander T. Wood and 
M.V. West River, be implemented in the 
Agreement signed between the above-named 
parties. 

1. The scale of wages payable to the 
unlicensed personnel will be that provided 
under the Canadian National Steamships 
Ltd. (West Indies) Standard Collective 
Agreement Form, plus 5% to be known as 
the "basic scale" and to be applicable at 
all times except when the vessels are en- 
gaged in Great Lakes or Coastal cargo 
voyages as defined in the following para- 
graph when it is agreed that the operators 
will provide wages, hours and conditions 
for the unlicensed crew as described in the 
Collective Agreement then in force between 
the Union and the Association of Lake 
Carriers, such wages, etc., to be known 
as the "differential". 

2. Great Lakes and Coastal Cargo Voy- 
ages as referred to in Paragraph 2 will 
mean voyages between ports within the 
area of the Great Lakes and the St. Law- 
rence River which will be effectively re- 
served to Canadian registered vessels under 
legislation enacted by the Canadian Govern- 
ment in pursuance of its declared policy 
to modify the British Commonwealth Ship- 
ping Agreement to exclude Commonwealth 
registered ships from trading within such 
area with the understanding that for the 
purpose of this agreement, the area within 
which the "differential" will apply will be 
contracted or extended automatically in line 
with whatever legislation is enacted by the 
Canadian Government to define from time 
to time the trading area reserved exclusively 
to Canadian registered vessels. 

The whole respectfully submitted, 

Montreal, November 27, 1961. 

(Sgd.) Rene Lippe, 
Chairman, 

(Sgd.) A. Stuart Hyndman, 
Member. 

(Sgd.) Jean Lariviere, 
Member. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 

52905-7— 5£ 



67 



Report of Board in Dispute between 

Motor Transport Industrial Relations Bureau, Toronto 

and 

International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, 
Warehousemen and Helpers of America 



This is the report of the Board of Con- 
ciliation which was appointed on or about 
the 28th day of September A.D. 1961. 

The Board met with the parties in 
Oshawa on October 20, 1961, at which time 
the companies were represented by: A. A. 
Bacon, McCallum Transport Ltd.; J. A. 
Donaldson, Motor Transport Industrial 
Relations Bureau; H. S. Ogden, McCallum 
Transport Ltd.; H. Allan, H. J. Quinn, H. 
H. Quinn, Maris Transport Ltd; R. A. Bouf- 
fard, Auto Haulaway Ltd.; G. W. Berry, 
Nu-Car Releasing Limited; H. J. Mothersill, 
Gen. Auto Shippers Ltd.; Lloyd Haynes, 
Charlton Transport Ltd; T. Steen, Russell 
Transport Ltd.; W. Henderson, F. W. Mur- 
ray, Motor Transport Industrial Relations 
Bureau. The union was represented by: Leo 
J. Labonbard, President; Syd McAfee, Busi- 
ness Agent; K. E. Fowler, Fred Moore, Al 
Boothef, G. Donovan, A. Ellis, L. Theorit, 
Negotiating Committee; Frank Godley, 
Union Reporter. 

The entire contract was referred to the 
Board as being in dispute between the 
parties. 

At the outset the union expressed the 
opinion that no genuine negotiations had 
taken place between the parties and the 
companies at no time had given serious 
consideration to the various non-monetary 
points which are in dispute. The union has 
decided that a completely new collective 
agreement should be negotiated at this time 
to clear up many of the vague portions of 
the existing contract, which expired on July 



During November, the Minister of Labour 
received the Report of the Board of Con- 
ciliation and Investigation established to 
deal with the dispute between Motor Trans- 
port Industrial Relations Bureau, Toronto 
(representing certain companies within 
federal jurisdiction), and Local 880 of the 
International Brotherhood of Teamsters, 
Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America. 

The Board was under the Chairmanship 
of His Honour Judge H. C. Arrell of 
Hamilton. He was appointed by the 
Minister on the joint recommendation of the 
other two members, Michael O'Brien and 
Paul Siren, both of Toronto, nominees of 
the Bureau and union, respectively. 

The Report is reproduced here. 



1 last. As a result, the demands of both 
the companies and the union were most 
detailed. 

The companies emphasized that they, too, 
wished to change many of the existing 
clauses in the contract and particularly 
those portions dealing with seniority provi- 
sions and work assignment. The companies 
also pointed out that the demands of the 
union for certain categories of employees 
amounted to approximately $1.35 per hour 
increase. The union was also requesting 
additional payments toward the welfare 
plan and extensive contributions toward 
a pension plan. 

The companies are most perturbed in that 
the union has been unable or unwilling to 
present details of the benefits which would 
be received by employees under both 
plans. This concern has resulted from com- 
plaints received by employees of the various 
companies that benefits have been curtailed 
while the funds are apparently producing a 
profit or a surplus. The companies have, 
therefore, required, as a condition of fur- 
ther negotiations on these points, that 
particulars of the respective plans indicating 
the benefits to which employees would 
become entitled must be presented before 
any consideration will be given to increas- 
ing the companies' contributions. 

The union indicated that it was willing 
to present in some detail, but with a cer- 
tain amount of flexibility, the particulars 
of these two plans. It appears obvious to 
the members of this Board that no true 
negotiating has taken place between the 
parties and it would seem that they have 
been relying on the protection of the Act 
to prevent either a strike or a lockout. No 
board of conciliation could possibly deal 
with the variety and extent of the points in 
dispute. It appeared to the members of the 
Board that only two alternatives were open, 
namely: 

(a) That the matter be adjourned for a 
short period of time to permit direct 
negotiations during this interval, or 

(b) That the Board disband, submit a 
report and allow the parties to deal directly 
with each other. 

(Continued on page 96) 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



LABOUR LAW 



Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 

British Columbia courts rule on limitations on peaceful picketing, on legality 
ot picketing all business locations of same employer, on question of court 
review of arbitration awards, on application of Labour Relations Board's cease 
and desist orders, and on the validity of a certification order of the Board 



In British Columbia, the Court of Appeal 
held that the Trade-unions Act does not 
prohibit peaceful information picketing in 
case of an illegal strike; in such situation, 
however, peaceful picketing that aims to 
persuade is prohibited. The restriction is 
not directed at the suppression of free 
speech but to protect freedom of an in- 
dividual to carry on his legitimate business 
without interference and is intra vires of the 
provincial legislature. 

In another decision, the Court of Appeal 
held that under the British Columbia Labour 
Relations Act the ruling of an arbitration 
board constituted by the parties under a col- 
lective agreement, being a decision of a 
private and not statutory arbitration board, 
is not subject to certiorari proceedings. 

The British Columbia Supreme Court 
ruled that the union, instead of using the 
cease and desist order procedure under the 
Labour Relations Act to obtain a restraining 
order, may claim such an order as an 
ancillary right in an action for damages 
under the Trade-unions Act. In another 
decision, the Supreme Court ruled that 
under the Trade-unions Act, when a strike 
is legal, a union that is bargaining agent 
for certain units of a company's employees 
in some of the company's business locations 
may lawfully picket other business places of 
the same company, for which it is not bar- 
gaining agent and where there is no labour 
dispute. In another decision, the court 
ruled that, when the Labour Relations 
Board, in certifying a union, did not either 
depart from or abuse its jurisdiction, the 
decision of the Board should not be quashed 
on procedural grounds. 

In Ontario, the High Court ruled that the 
Jurisdictional Disputes Commission under 
the Labour Relations Act had no jurisdic- 
tion to deal with a compaint regarding the 



assignment of work coming from a union 
that had no members in the company's 
employ. 

British Columbia Court of Appeal . . . 

. . . holds that Trade- unions Act does not prohibit 
information picketing, upholds limitations in Act 

On August 17, 1961, the British Colum- 
bia Court of Appeal dismissed an appeal 
from the judgment of Mr. Justice Lord of 
the B.C. Supreme Court (L.G., Aug. 1961, 
p. 821) and held, with one judge dissenting, 
that Section 3 of the Trade-unions Act does 
not prohibit picketing or communication of 
information entirely; it does, however, 
prohibit picketing with the object of 
persuading somebody to refrain from doing 
the things specifically mentioned in Sec- 
tion 3(2), except when there is a legal strike 
or lockout. Further, the Court held that 
the true object of the restrictions on the 
right to picket under Section 3(2) of the 
Act was the protection of the liberty of a 
person to carry on his legitimate business 
and to use his premises without interference, 
except in case of a legal strike or lockout. 

Mr. Justice Tysoe, rendering the majority 
judgment, recalled that a building contractor 
who was engaged in constructing a service 
station in Vancouver was approached by a 
man claiming to be a representative of the 
carpenters' union who told him that all 
carpenters employed on the construction 
work would have to join the carpenters' 
union or that members of that union would 
have to be employed on the work. The 
constructor told the man that the men 
working for him did not want to join the 
union. 

Some days later, the person in question 
appeared at the site of construction with 
a placard that read "non-union men are 



This section, prepared by the Legislation Branch, reviews labour laws as they are 
enacted by Parliament and the provincial legislatures, regulations under these laws, and 
selected court decisions affecting labour. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



working on this job." Sometimes he was 
accompanied by another man. Some sup- 
pliers of materials for the construction 
refused to cross this picket line, resulting 
in delay in the work, and damage. Apart 
from the alleged breach of Section 3 of 
the B.C. Trade-unions Act, there was no 
wrongful conduct. 

The picketing was stopped when the 
contractor obtained, first, an ex parte in- 
junction restraining picketing for four days. 
Later, on May 2, Mr. Justice Lord gave 
judgment to continue injunction until the 
trial. From the latter judgment, appeal was 
made on the grounds that the judge erred 
in holding that Section 3(2) of the Trade- 
unions Act rendered unlawful the picket- 
ing conducted in the case under review 
and that Section 3(2) of the Act infringed 
freedom of speech and the exercise of that 
freedom by the citizens of Canada, and was 
therefore ultra vires the Legislature of the 
province of British Columbia. 

Section 3 of the Trade-unions Act reads 
as follows: 

S. 3 (1) Where there is a strike that is not 
illegal under the Labour Relations Act or a 
lockout, a trade-union, members of which are 
on strike or locked out, and anyone authorized 
by the trade-union may, at the employer's place 
of business, operations or employment, and 
without acts that are otherwise unlawful, per- 
suade or endeavour to persuade anyone not to 

(a) enter the employer's place of business, 
operations, or employment; or 

(b) deal in or handle the products of the 
employer; or 

(c) do business with the employer. 

(2) Except as provided in subsection (1), 
no trade-union or other person shall persuade 
or endeavour to persuade not to 

(a) enter an employer's place of business, 
operations, or employment; or 

(b) deal in or handle the products of any 
person; or 

(c) do business with any person. 

Mr. Justice Tysoe concurred with the 
opinion of the Court below that Section 
3 does not prohibit picketing or the dis- 
semination or communication of informa- 
tion entirely. But, in his opinion, it does 
prohibit picketing or the dissemination or 
communication of information in an effort 
to persuade anybody to refrain from doing 
the things specifically mentioned in sub- 
section (2), except as provided in sub- 
section (1). 

It is the purpose with which the picket- 
ing or communication of information is 
done that determines whether it is illegal 
under Section 3(2). In determining that 
purpose, Mr. Justice Tysoe added, regard 
has to be given to the results that were or 
must have been known to be likely to 
follow. 



In the case under review, there was no 
strike or lockout. It was argued that the 
person accused of the breach of the Act did 
not "persuade or endeavour to persuade" 
anyone to do any of the things set out in 
(a), (b) or (c) of Section 3(2), but that he 
was doing no more than giving out informa- 
tion or "carrying on information picketing." 
The alleged purpose of picketing was simply 
to let interested persons know the facts so 
that they could do as they wished. 

In Mr. Justice Tysoe's opinion, persuasion 
takes many forms. It may be by words or 
conduct, or both, and conduct can be as 
powerful a means of persuasion as words. 
He could not accept the contention that the 
man who was picketing was doing no more 
than giving out information to persons who 
might be in or about the business premises 
of the contractor that "non-union men are 
working on this job." No doubt, information 
was being given out, but the walking up 
and down in front of the premises carrying 
a sign, accompanied at times by someone 
else — picketing as such conduct is called — 
was more than informing. It was a means 
of persuading or endeavouring to persuade 
persons to do any or some of the things 
set out in (a), (b), (c) of subsection 2 
of Section 3 of the Trade-unions Act. 

The question whether a person is persuad- 
ing or endeavouring to persuade someone 
else to do some particular things depends in 
great measure on the purpose and intention 
behind certain acts. The man who was 
picketing in the case under review was not, 
in Mr. Justice Tysoe's opinion, giving out 
information in the abstract; he must have 
hoped for some result from his conduct, 
and his hope, his intention and his purpose 
were to persuade persons not to do any or 
some of the things set out in Section 3(2). 
This hope and purpose was, in fact, realized, 
in that some suppliers of materials for the 
construction work refused to cross the picket 
line. 

Having found that the man in question 
was giving out information, one cannot stop 
there; but one must go on and determine 
what purpose was behind the giving out of 
information in the manner in which it was 
being given out. Picketing, which was the 
manner employed, is a well-known method 
used by labour to induce persons not to deal 
with the person or company whose premises 
are being picketed, and not to enter those 
premises. In Mr. Justice Tysoe's opinion, 
under the conditions and in the circum- 
stances of the dispute under review, the 
picketing constituted an endeavour to per- 
suade within the meaning of Section 3(2) 
of the Act. 



70 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY T962 



An argument was advanced that those 
persons who refused to cross the picket line 
made the decision for themselves. In Mr. 
Justice Tysoe's opinion, they did so because 
they were 'persuaded" by the man who was 
picketing. 

Next, Mr. Justice Tysoe dealt with the 
submission that Section 3, subsection (2) of 
the Trade-unions Act infringes freedom of 
speech and the exercise thereof by citizens 
of Canada and is therefore ultra vires the 
Legislature of the Province of British 
Columbia. 

In this respect, it was submitted to the 
Court that freedom of speech is one of the 
foundations of the Canadian Constitution. 
It extends not only to the political affairs 
of the nation and the provinces, but to every 
kind of economic and social activity. Free- 
dom of speech is exercisable in relation to 
industrial disputes, and peaceful picketing 
is a legitimate expression of that freedom. 
The provinces cannot pass legislation that 
infringes freedom of speech; therefore, the 
provinces cannot pass legislation curtailing 
the right to picket peacefully. Nobody was 
denying that the legislation in question was 
relating to property and civil rights in the 
province, but the contention was that sub- 
section 2 encroached upon the right of every 
Canadian citizen to engage in free speech, 
and no province can, by legislation, en- 
croach upon that right. Therefore, subsec- 
tion (2) is outside the scope of Section 92 
of the B.N. A. Act. 

Mr. Justice Tysoe said he was not aware 
of any judicial decision that would hold 
that a provincial Legislature, when legisla- 
ting in relation to a matter coming within 
the classes of subjects enumerated in Sec- 
tion 92 of the B.N. A. Act, could not, under 
any circumstances nor to any extent, in- 
cidentally infringe upon what is called free- 
dom of speech. In fact, some eminent judges 
recognized this right of the provinces. 

When the past judgments speak of free- 
dom of speech, they experss only an opinion 
that provinces have no power to enact legis- 
lation that, in its true nature and character, 
relates to freedom of expression concerning 
any policy or activity of government or poli- 
tical parties or public men, or concerning 
public affairs or religious subjects or bodies. 
They are speaking in terms of the political 
institutions or religious practices of this 
country, subject matters that, in the opinion 
of Mr. Justice Tysoe, are outside the scope 
of the case at bar. 

Moreover, freedom of speech is not un- 
limited. In Reference re Alberta Bills 
(1938), S.C.R. 100, Chief Justice Duff said: 
The right of public discussion is, of course, 
subject to legal restrictions; those based upon 
consideration of decency and public order, and 



others conceived for the protection of various 
private and public interests with which, for 
example, the laws of defamation and sedition 
are concerned. 

In James v. Commonwealth (1938) A.C. 
578, Lord Wright stated: 

"Free" in itself is vague and indeterminate . . . 
Free speech does not mean free speech; it 
means speech hedged in by all the laws against 
defamation, blasphemy, sedition and so forth; 
it means "freedom governed by law". 

Prof. W. R. Lederman, in his article 
entitled "The Nature and Problems of a 
Bill of Rights" (37 Can. Bar Review) said: 

We depend on the law to define the outside 
limits of the respective areas of freedom or 
liberty in the total realm of actual or possible 
human activity . . . Freedom of expression is the 
residual area of natural liberty remaining after 
the makers of the common law and the statute 
law have encroached a little by creating incon- 
sistent duties. 

To these quotations, Mr. Justice Tysoe 
added that "freedom cannot be unlimited, if 
only because the interests of the whole com- 
munity of citizens require that some limita- 
tions and restrictions be placed upon it." 

Returning to the consideration of the 
"pith and substance" of subsection (2) of 
Section 3, Mr. Justice Tysoe noted that 
the subsection was, in essence, a prohibi- 
tion against persuading or endeavouring 
to persuade anyone not to have business 
dealings with a person. But this prohibition 
is subject to an exception contained in 
subsection (1). Where there is a legal 
strike or a lockout, a trade union, members 
of which are on strike or locked out, and 
anyone authorized by the trade union, may, 
at the employer's place of business, opera- 
tions or employment and without acts that 
are otherwise unlawful, persuade or 
endeavour to persuade anyone not to have 
business dealings with the employer. The 
two subsections must be read together as 
expressing a single legislative purpose. 

The true object, purpose, nature or char- 
acter of subsection (2) is, Mr. Justice 
Tysoe added, protection of the liberty of a 
person to carry on his legitimate business 
in the province and to the use of his 
premises without interference, except when 
he is an employer who is himself involved 
in a legal strike or a lockout. The purpose 
of subsection (2) is to prevent interference 
with the lawful business and operations of 
a person who is not himself involved as 
an employer in a legal strike or a lockout. 
The subsection is in no way directed to the 
suppression of free speech, albeit it may 
have the incidental affect of limiting what 
one person may say of or about another or 
his business. This incidental effect does not 
place it outside the legislative competence 
of the province. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE ♦ JANUARY 7962 



71 



In conclusion, Mr. Justice Tysoe held 
that Section 3 of the Trade unions Act is 
legislation which, in its true nature and 
character, relates to property and civil rights 
within the province and, therefore, is 
intra vires the legislature of British 
Columbia. 

Mr. Justice Norris, in his dissenting 
opinion, held that the Trade-unions Act of 
1959 did not prohibit information picketing. 
The distinction between information picket- 
ing and persuasive picketing has always 
been recognized in the court decisions. In 
the case at bar, the picketing that took 
place was information picketing and the 
refusal of suppliers to carry out their con- 
tracts was the result of their decisions and 
the contractor's remedy, if any, was 
against the suppliers. While admitting that 
there can be forms of persuasion by pas- 
sive means, Mr. Justice Norris held that 
the word "persuade" in Section 3(2) 
requires definite action, i.e., active persuasion 
which, in his opinion, did not take place 
in the case at bar. 

The Court of Appeal, with Mr. Justice 
Norris dissenting, dismissed the appeal and 
upheld the judgment of Mr. Justice Lord 
of the British Columbia Supreme Court 
Koss v. Konn et al (1961), 36 W.W.R.. 
Part 3, p. 100. 

British Columbia Court of Appeal. . . 

. . . rules that writ of certiorari not applicable 
to arbitrators set up by collective agreement 

On May 19, 1961, British Columbia 
Court of Appeal held that prerogative writs 
of certiorari and prohibition are not 
applicable to ordinary private arbitrators 
set up by agreement of the parties under a 
collective agreement. Such writs are 
applicable only in case of a statutory 
arbitrator or arbitration board to whom, by 
statute, the parties must resort. 

The court was considering an appeal by 
the International Union of Mine, Mill and 
Smelter Works of Canada, Local 663, from 
the judgment of Mr. Justice Mclnnes of 
November 29, 1960, in which upon an 
application by Howe Sound Co., certiorari 
was applied to quash an award of a board 
of arbitration appointed under the provi- 
sions of a collective agreement between 
the Company and Local 663. 

Counsel for the union submitted that the 
Company's application for a writ of 
certiorari was misconceived in that 
certiorari does not lie against the decision 
of the arbitration board in the case under 
review. 



Section 22 of the B.C. Labour Relations 
Act (before 1961 amendments), which was 
in force at all relevant times, is as follows: 

S. 22(1) Every collective agreement entered 
into after the commencement of this Act shall 
contain a provision for final and conclusive 
settlement without stoppage of work, by arbi- 
tration or otherwise*, of all differences between 
the persons bound by the agreement concerning 
its interpretation, application, operation, or any 
alleged violation thereof. 

(2) Where a collective agreement, whether 
entered into before or after the commencement 
of this Act, does not contain a provision as 
required by this section, the Minister shall by 
order prescribe a provision for such purpose, 
and a provision so prescribed shall be deemed 
to be a term of the collective agreement and 
binding on all persons bound by the agreement. 

The collective agreement in force between 
the Company and the Union, dated Novem- 
ber 27, 1958 and effective December 1, 
1958, provided in Art. 16 for grievance 
procedure. In the case of any local dispute 
that could not be settled between the 
employee and the shiftboss or foreman, 
the matter was to be submitted in writing 
to the Plant Grievance Committee and to 
the Superintendent. If they failed to settle 
the dispute, the matter was to be submitted 
in writing to the Manager and the repre- 
sentative of the International Union of 
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers on the 
General Grievance Committee of the local 
union. In the event of their failure to 
agree, they would endeavour to select 
an arbitration board of three, in accordance 
with a procedure set out in the agreement. 

The grievance procedure provisions also 
provided that pending the settlement of the 
dispute the employees involved must con- 
tinue to work until final decision has been 
reached. 

Under Art. 16 of the collective agreement, 
the arbitration board was set up and, on 
November 28, 1960, a decision was 
rendered, which later was challenged and 
quashed on certiorari proceedings. 

Mr. Justice Tysoe, who rendered the judg- 
ment of the Court of Appeal, noted that 
certiorari does not lie against an arbitrator 
or arbitration board unless the arbitrator or 
board is a statutory arbitrator or statutory 
board, that is, a person or a board to whom, 
by statute, the parties must resort. Preroga- 
tive writs of certiorari and prohibition, he 
added, do not go to ordinary private arbitra- 
tion boards set up by agreement of parties. 
Consequently, the issue at bar was to decide 
whether the arbitration board, in the case 
under review, was a private arbitration body 
set up by agreement or a statutory board. 



*In the 1961 amendment, the word "otherwise" 
was replaced by "such other method as may be 
agreed to by the parties." 



72 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



In the opinion of Mr. Justice Tysoe, only 
by reason of the provisions of Section 22 of 
the Labour Relations Act could the arbitra- 
tion board qualify as a statutory board. The 
question was, therefore, did Section 22 
create a statutory arbitration board to which 
the parties to the collective agreement have 
agreed to refer for the final settlement of 
their differences? 

His answer to this question was in the 
negative. In his view, Section 22 did not 
create an arbitral tribunal or any other 
tribunal or body. It merely requires the 
parties to a collective agreement to agree 
between themselves on a method for finally 
and conclusively settling any differences 
without stoppage of work, and to embody 
their agreement in the collective agreement. 
If they do not do this, the Minister is to do 
it for them and his method becomes em- 
bodied in and forms part of the collective 
agreement. The method may be "by arbitra- 
tion or otherwise." The parties may select 
and provide their own method and the only 
condition is that it shall achieve the desired 
result, namely, the final and conclusive set- 
tlement of differences without stoppage of 
work. 

Further, Mr. Justice Tysoe added that 
the Legislature had not said that the parties 
must report to an arbitration board or to 
any particular person or body of persons. 
It has left the parties complete freedom of 
choice in this respect. All the Legislature 
has said was that there must be a method 
by which disputes will be finally and con- 
clusively determined without stoppage of 
work. To find the method, one turns to the 
collective agreement. 

In the case at bar the parties have agreed 
that all differences should be settled by an 
arbitration board of three, one to be selected 
by the Union, one by the Company, and a 
third, who would be the chairman, by the 
other two, and failing their agreement, by 
the Labour Relations Board of British 
Columbia. This, in Mr. Justice Tysoe's 
opinion, was a private arbitration board set 
up by the parties themselves and not by the 
Legislature. It was not a statutory body, 
therefore certiorari was not applicable. 

Mr. Justice Tysoe distinguished the situa- 
tion under the B.C. Labour Relations Act 
in the case under review from that in the 
case Re International Nickel Co. of Canada 
Ltd. and Rivando (L.G., Sept. 1956, 
p. 1155) in which the Court of Appeal of 
Ontario dealt with Ontario legislation which 
made it compulsory for parties to a collec- 
tive agreement to resort to arbitration for 
settlement of differences and where cer- 
tiorari was held to be applicable to such 
arbitration. On the other hand, the B.C. 



Labour Relations Act does not have that 
effect because it provides that settlement 
may be by arbitration or otherwise, and it 
leaves the parties free to agree upon the 
method. 

Mr. Justice Tysoe relied also on the judg- 
ment of Chief Justice McNair who, when 
delivering the judgment of the appeal divi- 
sion of the Supreme Court of New Bruns- 
wick in Re Atlantic Sugar Refineries Ltd., 
and Bakery and Confectionery Workers In- 
ternational Union of America, Local No. 
443 (L.G., July 1961, p. 689), said: 

There is little resemblance between the pro- 
visions of the Ontario legislation involved in 
the Rivando case and those found in S. 18 of 
our Labour Relations Act. The latter do not 
compel resort to arbitration nor to a tribunal 
created by statute. They require the inclusion 
in every collective agreement of a provision for 
the final settlement without stoppage of work 
of differences concerning the meaning of viola- 
tion of the agreement by arbitration or other- 
wise, and further provide that, in the event of 
failure of the parties to so provide, the Labour 
Relations Board shall, upon application by 
either party to the agreement, by order prescribe 
a provision for such purpose and a provision 
so prescribed shall be deemed to be a term of 
the collective agreement and binding on the 
parties and others mentioned. 

In the New Brunswick case, the Court 
had before it legislation resembling in form 
Section 22 of the British Columbia Labour 
Relations Act. 

Mr. Justice Tysoe reserved for future con- 
sideration the question of what the situation 
would be should the parties to a collective 
agreement fail to include in the agreement 
a provision for final and conclusive settle- 
ment without stoppage of work so as to 
bring into operation the provisions of sub- 
section (2) of Section 22 of the Labour 
Relations Act. 

In conclusion, Mr. Justice Tysoe held that 
the union's appeal should be allowed and 
the arbitration board's decision restored on 
the ground that the decision in question was 
not subject to certiorari. Howe Sound Com- 
pany v. International Union of Mine, Mill 
and Smelter Workers {Canada) Local 663, 
(1961), 36 W.W.R., Part 4, p. 181. 

British Columbia Supreme Court. . . 

. . .holds Labour Relations Boards may make order in 
nature of an injunction but can not award damages 

On May 23, 1961, Mr. Justice Wilson of 
the British Columbia Supreme Court, on a 
motion to dissolve an ex parte labour injunc- 
tion obtained previously by a trade union 
from Mr. Justice Munroe of the same court, 
ruled that the right of the union to seek 
a cease and desist order from the Labour 
Relations Board under Section 7 of the 
Labour Relations Act for violation by the 
employer of specified provisions of the Act 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

52905-7—6 



• JANUARY 7962 



73 



does not prevent the union from resorting 
instead to an action for damages under 
Section 4 of the Trade-unions Act for 
violation of the Labour Relations Act; then 
the union may claim also an injunction as 
an ancillary right and need not resort, under 
Section 7 of the Labour Relations Act, to 
the Labour Relations Board, in duplicate 
proceedings, for a restraining order. 

Local 535 of the Retail, Wholesale and 
Department Store Union obtained an 
ex parte injunction restraining McLennan, 
McFeely and Prior Ltd., from doing cer- 
tain acts prohibited by the Labour Relations 
Act. The union had alleged, without being 
contradicted, breaches by the company of 
Sections 4 and 6 of the Labour Relations 
Act (the sections deal with the employers' 
unfair labour practices in connection with 
employees' union activities) and conse- 
quential irreparable or incalculable damage 
to the Union resulting from the company's 
behaviour. 

In presenting the motion to dissolve this 
injunction, the company claimed that 
Section 7 of the Labour Relations Act 
established a code or method for dealing 
with the complaints under Sections 4, 5, or 
6 of the Labour Relations Act leading to 
a cease and desist order of the Labour 
Relations Board, and that the Union should 
resort to the procedure and not be allowed 
to maintain the injunction. 

Mr. Justice Wilson did not accept this 
submission. In his opinion, the union can 
recover damages, and can recover damages 
for breaches of Sections 4 and 6 of the 
Labour Relations Act only by resorting to 
Section 4 of the Trade-unions Act, which 
reads as follows: 

4 (1) An employers' organization, trade- 
union, or other person who 

(a) does, authorizes, or concurs in anything 
prohibited by the Labour Relations Act; 
or 

(b) fails to do anything required by the 
Labour Relations Act; or 

(c) does, authorizes, or concurs in anything 
that is contrary to Section 3 of this Act 

is liable in damages to anyone injured thereby. 

(2) The act of any member of an employers' 
organization or trade-union is presumed, unless 
the contrary is shown, to be done, authorized 
or concurred in by the employers' organization 
or trade-union. 

Further, Mr. Justice Wilson added that 
Section 7 of the Labour Relations Act does 
not empower the Labour Relations Board 
to award damages; it does, however, permit 
the Labour Relations Board to make an 
order in the nature of an injunction. How- 
ever, the power to grant an injunction is a 



usual and ancillary right arising under 
proper circumstances in an action for 
damages. 

The company, in Mr. Justice Wilson's 
opinion, could not argue that the Union 
might not, under Section 4 of the Trade- 
unions Act, sue for damages. And, if this 
is so, the Union may also enforce the ancil- 
lary right to an injunction and need not 
resort to the Labour Relations Board in 
duplicate proceedings under Section 7 of 
the Labour Relations Act to obtain a 
restraining order. 

The application to dissolve injunction was 
dismissed. Retail, Wholesale and Department 
Store Union, Local 535, v. McLennan, 
McFeely and Prior Ltd., (1961), 29 D.L.R. 
(2d), Parts 2 and 3, p. 191. 

British Columbia Supreme Court. . . 

. . . rules that union not prevented from picketing 
other places of business of the same employer 

On September 7, 1961, Mr. Justice 
Collins of the British Columbia Supreme 
Court ruled that Section 3(1) of the Trade- 
unions Act does not prevent a trade union 
that was certified as bargaining agent in 
respect of some of an employer's places of 
business from picketing, in the course of a 
legal strike, other places of business of the 
same employer for which the union was not 
bargaining agent. 

Taylor, Pearson & Carson (B.C.) Limited 
carries on business as a wholesale auto- 
motive, industrial and electronic supplier 
at 13 or more different locations in British 
Columbia. Local 535 of the Retail, Whole- 
sale and Department Store Union was the 
certified bargaining agent for certain units 
of the company's employees at eight only 
of the locations and had a collective agree- 
ment which did not cover the employees in 
the remaining locations and which expired 
on May 31, 1960. An entirely different 
union had a collective agreement with the 
company's employees at three locations for 
which Local 535 was not certified. 

Negotiations followed without settle- 
ment and later conciliation proceedings took 
place, also without settlement. On July 17, 
1961, the company's employees, at five of 
the eight locations for which Local 535 was 
certified, went on strike. In the course of 
the strike, Local 535 also picketed five of 
the company's locations in respect of which 
it was not certified as to any unit and where 
there was no strike. 

The company claimed that picketing of 
these five locations caused a falling off in 
business and breaches of contract that the 
company had with cartage contractors. 



74 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



The Union had publicly stated the inten- 
tion of picketing all of the company's 
operations in the province. The placards 
carried by the pickets read as follows: 
"Members of Retail Wholesale Union A.F. 
of L.— C.I.O. Employed by Taylor, Pear- 
son & Carson (B.C.) Ltd. Elsewhere on 
Strike." The company argued that although 
the statement on the placards was true, 
nevertheless they misled members of the 
public and customers into believing that 
a strike was in existence at those five 
premises. The company conceded that the 
strike in which Local 535 was involved was 
legal and the union conceded that the 
pickets were endeavouring to persuade the 
persons who approached the five locations 
in question not to perform any of the 
actions referred to in Section 3(1) of the 
Trade-unions Act. Further, the union 
claimed that the prohibition contained in 
subsection (2) did not apply to the pickets. 

Mr. Justice Collins summed up the com- 
pany's argument as follows: The status of 
a trade union in relation to an employer is 
determined by the Labour Relations Act in 
relation to units of employees appropriate 
for collective bargaining; that under the Act 
and regulations certification of a trade 
union is made with respect to one or more 
units; that collective agreements are made 
with respect to one or more units; that pro- 
posed strikes are voted on by units separately 
and strikes are declared with respect to 
individual units; that the mutual rights and 
duties as between employer and employee 
in the Labour Relations Act are dealt with 
by the Legislature on a unit basis and 
therefore it was logical to assume that when 
other rights and duties as between 
employees and trade unions were made the 
subject of the further legislation found 
in the Trade-unions Act, the Legislature 
intended it to apply on a unit basis. Con- 
sequently, if Section 3(1) be applied on a 
uniit basis, the permission thereby given 
to a trade union applies only to locations 
where its members are on strike in units 
for which the union is certified. Further, the 
company argued that, if the permission 
given by Section 3 to persuade or endeavour 
to persuade anyone not to perform any of 
the acts listed under (a), (b), (c) of 
Section 3(1) be not interpreted so as to 
apply on a unit basis, it could very well 
result in permissible picketing of locations 
containing only units of the union's own 
members which were not on strike, as well 
as locations containing only employee units 
for whom another trade union was certified 
and in respect of which there was a sub- 
sisting collective agreement and no strike. 



The Union, relying on Mr. Justice Rand's 
statement in Aristocratic Restaurants Ltd. v. 
Williams (L.G. 1951, p. 1553), argued that 
strikes and peaceful picketing have long 
been recognized as a lawful and proper 
method of bringing economic pressure 
against the whole undertaking of an 
employer. In the Aristocratic Restaurants 
case, Mr. Justice Rand said: 

The fact that two of the restaurants were 
not within the unit of employees for which 
the union was authorized to act does not affect 
the question; the owner's economic strength 
is derived from his total business; and it is 
against that that the influence of information 
is being exerted. 

Mr. Justice Collins, in reaching his de- 
cision, referred to the so-called golden rule 
of interpretation to be found in Maxwell 
on Interpretation of Statutes (10th ed., 
P. 7): 

The golden rule is that the words of a statute 
must prima facie be given their ordinary 
meaning . . . Judges are not called upon to 
apply their opinions of sound policy so as to 
modify the plain meaning of statutory words. . . 

Mr. Justice Collins did not find any pro- 
vision of Section 3 of the Trade-unions Act, 
when interpreted in accordance with the 
above rule, to be repugnant to any provision 
in the Labour Relations Act. 

Counsel for the company suggested that 
the opening words of subsection ( 1 ) of Sec- 
tion 3 "where there is a strike" could 
properly be interpreted as meaning or 
designating "a place at which a strike is in 
existence." Mr. Justice Collins noted that 
the meanings given for the word "where" 
by the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary 
make it clear that the word "where" may 
refer to either "place" or "circumstances". 
In his view, as used at the beginning of sub- 
section (1) of Section 3, the words "where 
there is a strike" means "in circumstances 
in which there is a strike." 

Referring to the dispute at bar, Mr. Jus- 
tice Collins noted that there was a strike 
which was not illegal under the Labour 
Relations Act. The members of Local 535 
for which the union was certified were on 
strike. Pickets in not improper numbers 
authorized by the union were present at 
several of the places of business, operations 
or employment of the company and, without 
acts that were otherwise unlawful, by means 
of their presence and placards containing 
true statements were persuading or en- 
deavouring to persuade persons not to per- 
form the acts set out in clauses (a), (b) and 
(c) of subsection (1) of section 3. In Mr. 
Justice Collin's view, this was exactly what 
Section 3(1) said in clear terms and with- 
out any ambiguity may lawfully be done. 
Nowhere in the Trade-unions Act could he 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 

52905-7—61 



75 



find any indication that the Legislature in- 
tended subsection (1) of Section 3 to be 
interpreted on the basis of whether a place 
of business, operations, or employment did 
or did not contain in whole or in part a unit 
of employees which was on strike or for 
which a given trade union was currently 
certified. 

The company's motion for an injunction 
to restrain Local 535 from picketing five of 
the company's business premises was dis- 
missed. Taylor, Pearson & Carson (B.C.) 
Limited v. Retail, Wholesale and Depart- 
ment Store Union, Local 535, (1961), 36 
W.W.R., Part 4, p. 175. 

British Columbia Supreme Court. . . 

. . refuses to quash certification order when 
complaint based mainly on procedural grounds 

On March 10, 1961, Mr. Justice Brown 
of the British Columbia Supreme Court, on 
certiorari motion, refused to quash a cer- 
tification order of the Labour Relations 
Board when the substantial complaint was 
as to procedural matters and when there was 
no departure from jurisdiction or an abuse 
of jurisdiction. 

In July 1952, the Fruit and Vegetable 
Workers' Union, Locals Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 
6, 8, 9 and 11, were certified for a unit 
employed by 23 employers in 30 packing- 
houses in the Okanagan Valley. Later, each 
of the said unions changed their name to 
B.C. Interior Fruit and Vegetable Workers' 
Union, Local No. 1572. Then the Board 
was requested to change the name of the 
unions in the certification order. The Board, 
being satisfied that the employees in the unit 
desired the requested change, issued, in May 
1959, pursuant to Section 65(2) of the 
Labour Relations Act, a "Variation of Cer- 
tificate" order by which the certification 
order of July 1952 was varied by deleting 
the names Fruit and Vegetable Workers' 
Unions, Locals Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 
and 11, and inserting in their place the name 
B.C. Interior Fruit and Vegetable Workers' 
Union, Local No. 1572. 

The Board's order was challenged, in 
certiorari proceedings, mainly on the point 
that although the order purported to be 
only a variation of a bargaining agent's 
name, in reality it created a bargaining 
certificate for a new entity. 

On the evidence presented, Mr. Justice 
Brown noted that there was more than a 
mere change of name involved. Actually, 
the new certified union was a different union 
from the agent originally certified. However, 
the Board and Local No. 1572 maintained 
that Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Unions, 
Locals Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 11, 



merged with B.C. Interior Fruit and Vege- 
table Workers' Union, Local No. 1572, and 
that substantially the same personnel were 
involved. Mr. Justice Brown had some 
doubts whether the procedure applied by 
the Board was strictly in accordance with 
legal niceties, but he noted that all parties 
were before the Board and the proceedings 
were not suggested to be irregular. No 
minority was overwhelmed by lack of notice 
or otherwise. In effect, Mr. Justice Brown 
added, the Board has compressed the some- 
what lengthy procedure that a lawyer might 
think necessary to perfect the metamor- 
phosis arising from the merger. 

Dealing with the matter of applicability 
of certiorari to the Labour Relations Board's 
decision, Mr. Justice Brown was of the 
opinion that, although there was no specific 
provision in the Labour Relations Act re- 
moving certiorari, the words "final and con- 
clusive" in Section 65(1) seemed to have 
the same effect. Also, he was in agreement 
with Mr. Justice Clyne who, in Re Alcazar 
Hotel Employees' Mutual Benefit Associa- 
tion (1954), 1 D.L.R. 722, held that, under 
the British Columbia Act, the right of the 
Court was as follows: 

... the Court . . . has the right, in spite of the 
prohibiting section of the Statute, to examine 
the decision of the Board to determine if it 
has departed from the provisions of the statute 
in such a way as to decline jurisdiction, or to 
exceed jurisdiction, or so as to act without 
jurisdiction or to abuse jurisdiction by denying 
substantial justice. 

In the same Alcazar Hotel decision, Mr. 
Justice Clyne dealt with the situation 
analogous to the short-cut taken by the 
Board in the case under review. Then Mr. 
Justice Clyne said: 

In granting certification to the Mutual Bene- 
fit Ass'n in respect of the employees of the 
Alcazar Hotel, the Board in effect varied its 
previous order whereby it had included those 
employees in the same unit with those em- 
ployed in the other thirty hotels. The Board 
has the power under S. 58 (2) to vary its 
decision of February 27, 1952, by eliminating 
the Alcazar employees from the unit created 
by the order of that date and it had jurisdic- 
tion under Ss. 10 and 12 of the Act to deter- 
mine that the employees of the Alcazar Hotel 
were in themselves in a unit appropriate for 
collective bargaining and that the Mutual Bene- 
fit Ass'n should be the bargaining agent. It 
may be that an order should have issued 
under S. 58 (2) varying the composition of the 
unit under the bargaining authority of Local 
28, but what the Board was doing was clear 
and any irregularity in taking what amounted 
to a short-cut cannot amount to lack of juris- 
diction, especially in view of S. 65, which 
provides that no proceeding under the Act 
shall be deemed invalid by reason of defect in 
form or technical irregularity. 



76 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



Section 65 referred to by Mr. Justice 
Clyne is now Section 70 and reads as 
follows: 

S. 70. No proceeding under this Act shall 
be deemed invalid by reason of any defect in 
form or any technical irregularity. 

In the result, Mr. Justice Clyne refused to 
quash the order. 

Mr. Justice Brown referred also to two 
cases, each entitled Banks et al. v. Can. 
Labour Relations Bd. (L.G., Dec. 1959, p. 
1313 and L.G., Feb. 1960, p. 176). In the 
second case, Mr. Justice Hughes refused to 
quash an order of the Canada Labour 
Relations Board where there was no 
failure to accord natural justice and where 
the Board did not deprive itself of jurisdic- 
tion or refuse or exceed jurisdiction. He 
referred to the words of the Chief Justice of 
the High Court in Re Jackson et al. v. 
Ontario Labour Relations Board (L.G., 
March 1955, p. 326), where he said: 

It is not for me to review either the findings 
of fact or the wisdom of the Board in coming 
to its conclusions. It is merely for me to 
consider: Did the Board do or omit to do any 
act that in law is sufficient to base a finding 
that it either deprived itself of jurisdiction or 
refused jurisdiction? . . . The Board has, in my 
view, acted in good faith and has fairly con- 
sidered the position of all parties to the appli- 
cation before it before issuing its order of 
June 11th, and this order should not be 
quashed. 

Mr. Justice Brown refused to quash the 
decision of the Board when the substantial 
complaint was as to procedural matters only. 
Re Okanagan Federated Shippers Associa- 
tion and British Columbia Interior Fruit 
and Vegetable Workers Union, Local 1572, 
(1961), 27 D.L.R. (2d), Part 9, p. 685. 

Ontario High Court... 

. . . quashes decision of Jurisdictional Disputes 
Commission as it had no power to hear complaint 

On May 19, 1961, Chief Justice McRuer 
of the Ontario High Court, in certiorari 
proceedings, quashed a decision of the 
Jurisdictional Disputes Commission on the 
ground that the Commission had no power 
to entertain an application coming from a 
union which had no members in the com- 
pany's employ. 

On January 24, 1961, a complaint was 
lodged under Section 66 of the Ontario 
Labour Relations Act by the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America against Canadian Pittsburgh 
Industries Limited that the company 
wrongly assigned the installation of window 
sash and frames to members of the Brother- 
hood of Painters, Decorators and Paper- 
hangers of America, Local 1783. 



The Jurisdictional Disputes Commission, 
in its interim order, found that the installa- 
tion of aluminum windows by virtue of an 
agreement of 1957 between the Brotherhood 
of Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers 
on one hand and the International Associa- 
tion of Bridge, Structural and Ornamental 
Iron Workers on the other, belonged to the 
latter. Further, the Commission found that, 
under another agreement of 1957 between 
the Iron Workers Union and the United 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of 
America, such installation was to be done 
by a composite crew composed equally of 
iron workers and carpenters. Consequently, 
the Commission ruled that the assignment 
of work belonged to and should be done 
by a composite crew of iron workers and 
carpenters. The company, who had no 
employees in either the iron workers' or 
carpenters' union, applied to have the order 
quashed. 

The relevant part of Section 66 of the 
Ontario Labour Relations Act reads as 
follows: 

S. 66 (1) Upon complaint to the Board [the 
Ontario Labour Relations Board] . . . that an 
employer was or is assigning particular work 
to employees in a particular trade union rather 
than to employees in another trade union, a 
jurisdictional disputes commission may, after 
consulting any person, employers' organization, 
trade union or council of trade unions that in 
its opinion may be affected by the complaint, 
make such interim order with respect to the 
assignment of the work as it in its discretion 
deems proper in the circumstances, and the 
employer, employers' organization, trade union, 
council of trade unions and the officers, offi- 
cials or agents of any of them shall comply 
with the interim order. 

The sole question in dispute before Chief 
Justice McRuer was whether Section 66 of 
the Act applied to the facts of the case 
under consideration. 

On the evidence submitted, the Chief 
Justice noted that the company had a col- 
lective agreement with the International 
Chemical Workers Union, Local 172. By 
an agreement between this union and the 
Brotherhood of Painters, it was agreed that 
the latter union would become part of the 
existing agreement with the International 
Chemical Workers Union, Local 172. 

It was contended before the Commission 
that certain work, which was done by the 
company's employees belonging to the 
Brotherhood of Painters, should be done 
by the members of the International 
Association of Bridge, Structural and 
Ornamental Iron Workers following the 
1957 agreement between the Painters and 
the Iron Workers, and that the Commission 
could decide accordingly. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



77 



Chief Justice McRuer disagreed with this 
contention. In his view, Section 66 contem- 
plates only those disputes that arise with 
respect to the assignment of work by an 
employer among his employees. The section 
does not apply where a trade union that 
has no members employed under the direc- 
tion of the employer complains that work 
is assigned to employees that, in the opinion 
of that trade union, should be done by the 
members of the complaining union. Other- 
wise, the Commission could compel an 
employer to engage workers to do work 
that his employees were perfectly willing 
to do. If it was the intention of the legisla- 
ture to give the Commission such wide 
powers to interfere with the peaceful rela- 
tions between the employer and his 



employees concerning which neither had 
made any complaint, much clearer language 
would be necessary than that used in Sec- 
tion 66(1), Chief Justice McRuer added. 

Also, the Chief Justice ruled, that as the 
Commission had no power to hear the 
complaint, the Labour Relations Board 
could have no power to review it. The 
Commission, by a wrong exercise of its 
jurisdiction, could not give the Labour 
Relations Board jurisdiction to review the 
Commission's order. Consequently, the 
proper remedy in the case at bar was 
certiorari and the ruling of the Court was 
to quash the Commission's interim order. 
Canadian Pittsburgh Industries Limited v. 
H. Orliffe et ah, Canadian Labour Law 
Reports, November 21, 1961, Para. 15, 373. 



Recent Regulations under Provincial Legislation 

B.C. adopts new regulations governing welding on boilers and pressure vessels, 
issues new rules for gas fitters and revises safety code for logging industry 



In British Columbia, new regulations 
under the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act 
governing welding and the qualifications of 
welders require contractors to be licensed, 
place new responsibilities upon welders and 
provide for three types of welders' certifi- 
cates. Revised regulations under the Gas 
Protection Act provide for two types of 
gas fitter's licence in place of the former 
general licence. The new special regulations 
for the logging industry issued by the Work- 
men's Compensation Board lay down more 
stringent requirements with respect to yard- 
ing equipment and signalling. 

Other recent regulations dealt with rules 
of procedure of the New Brunswick Labour 
Relations Board, safety committees in 
Alberta and gas appliances subject to the 
Alberta Gas Protection Act. 

Alberta Gas Protection Act 

Alberta has amended its regulations 
governing gas installations, issuing Alta. 
Reg. 331/61 under the Gas Protection Act. 
Gazetted November 15, it revises Alta. 
Reg. 637/57, as amended (L.G. 1959, p. 
1084). 

The new regulations, as previously, 
specify that appliances, apparatus and 
equipment approved or certified by the 
Canadian Gas Association, Canadian 
Standards Association, or Underwriters' 
Laboratories of Canada will be accepted, 
with the new proviso that they meet the 
requirements of authorized specifications or 



laboratory test requirements and any sup- 
plemental requirements adopted under the 
Gas Protection Act. 

The regulations now also provide that 
appliances, apparatus or equipment, or 
assemblies of certified equipment for which 
it is not feasible or practical to obtain 
certification from recognized laboratories 
are subject to special inspection and test by 
the Gas Protection Branch. On approval, 
the Branch will so mark or label these items. 

Alberta Workmen's Compensation Act 

Alberta has issued, under the Workmen's 
Compensation Act, Alta. Reg. 329/61 relat- 
ing to safety committees. Gazetted Novem- 
ber 15, it amends Alta. Reg. 780/57. 

The new regulation provides that every 
employer who employs ten or more work- 
men, but usually fewer than ten at any 
one place, must ascertain from the Board 
what type of safety supervision his opera- 
tions require in lieu of safety committees. 
The employer is obligated to carry out the 
safety measures prescribed by the Board 
and to submit monthly reports to the 
Board in connection with these require- 
ments. 

As before, the general requirement apply- 
ing to any employer of ten or more work- 
men is that a safety committee of not fewer 
than two members must be established. 



78 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



British Columbia Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act 

British Columbia has issued under the 
Boiler and Pressure Vessel Act compre- 
hensive new regulations governing welding 
and the qualifications of welders. Gazetted 
on September 21 as B.C. Reg. 145/61, they 
supplement the more general provisions 
dealing with welding in B.C. Reg. 1/60 
(L.G. 1960, p. 612). 

The new regulations apply to all welding 
in connection with the construction, altera- 
tion, or repair of any boiler, pressure vessel 
or pressure piping subject to inspection, 
approval or registration under the Act. 

They provide that no boiler, pressure ves- 
sel, or pressure piping to be used in the 
province may be constructed by welding 
unless its design has been approved and 
registered by the Chief Inspector. Pressure 
piping constructed, fabricated, or installed 
by welding in the province must comply 
with the requirements of these regulations. 

A new licensing system has been intro- 
duced requiring the licensing of contractors 
(including self-employed welders) who weld 
boilers, pressure vessels or pressure piping. 
The Chief Inspector may grant a con- 
tractor's licence if an inspector reports that 
the applicant's premises are equipped and 
adequate, that he employs sufficient quali- 
fied welders and that his records and 
procedures are in order. The Chief Inspector 
may impose such limitations on the con- 
tractor's licence as he deems necessary and 
also may suspend or cancel a licence if the 
contractor fails to comply with the Act or 
regulations or with an inspector's order. He 
may not suspend a licence for more than 
one month, however, nor may he revoke a 
licence until he has given the contractor a 
hearing. If a licence has been revoked, the 
approval or consent of the Advisory Board 
is necessary before a new one may be 
granted. 

The regulations now specifically state 
that the responsibility for the quality of the 
welding, the application of the correct 
procedure and the nature of the work done 
by his welder lies with the fabricator, that 
is, the contractor, manufacturer or other 
person who employs a welder or does weld- 
ing on his own account. 

A fabricator must arrange for a welding 
procedure qualification test and, if the 
inspector is satisfied that the procedure 
will produce sound welds that will meet the 
requirements of the A.S.M.E. or A.S.A. 
Codes, he must then arrange to have his 
welders tested using the approved procedure. 

He is now permitted to accept, without a 
new test, a welder who has been qualified 
by another employer using the same or an 



equivalent welding procedure provided 
the essential variables are within the limits 
laid down in Section IX of the A.S.M.E. 
Code. The employer must, however, return 
the welder's certificate to the Chief In- 
spector and give the procedure number 
of the work that the welder will do. If the 
Chief Inspector considers the transfer 
satisfactory, he may issue a new certificate 
to the welder. 

A fabricator may be granted authority to 
use one of four procedures, applicable to 
certain carbon steels, prescribed by the 
Department of Public Works and set out in 
appendices to the regulations. 

The employer is now required to assign 
to each welder an identification number, 
letter or symbol to identify that welder's 
work, and to show this identification mark 
in a record which, as formerly, must con- 
tain information pertaining to his qualifica- 
tion tests. The employer is also obligated 
now to provide his welders with such 
equipment and assistance as may be required 
to comply with the new safety rules. 

Additional obligations are now placed 
upon the welder. He must, as previously, be 
the holder of an unexpired welder's certif- 
icate. A welder is now expressly forbidden to 
do any welding by a process or in any posi- 
tion or with any classification of base metal 
or filler metal for which he has not been 
qualified. He also is required to conform 
strictly to the welding procedure provided 
by the fabricator. No self-employed 
welder may do any welding on any boiler, 
pressure vessel or pressure piping until 
such work has been authorized by an 
inspector and unless he holds a valid con- 
tractor's licence. 

The new regulations contain specific pro- 
visions authorizing an inspector to inspect 
and test any boiler, pressure vessel, or 
pressure piping that has been welded, and 
to reject or condemn unsatisfactory work. 
He may also refuse to issue a certificate of 
inspection permitting operation and the 
Chief Inspector may cancel any certificate 
already issued if the welding has not been 
done properly or the welder is unqualified. 

Provision is made for the issue of three 
types of certificate, Grade A, Grade P and 
provisional. A Grade A certificate permits 
the holder to do all types of welding under 
the Act, subject to whatever limitations are 
endorsed on the certificate. The holder of 
a Grade P certificate may weld pipe lines, 
distribution mains, gas mains, as well as 
pressure piping in gas compression stations, 
gas metering and regulating stations when- 
ever the downhill welding technique can 
be used. A provisional certificate permits 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



79 



the holder to weld on one specific job or 
type of work for the period and within the 
area stated on the certificate. An applicant 
for a provisional certificate may be required 
to take whatever qualification tests the Chief 
Inspector considers proper. 

The holder of an existing welder's certif- 
icate may continue to do welding until his 
certificate expires, after which time he 
must apply for a retest. 

The regulations set out offences in con- 
nection with welders' certificates. They also 
provide that the Chief Inspector may 
suspend, mark or cancel a welder's certifi- 
cate as a result of the finding of a Coroner's 
inquest or for specified causes, including 
incapacity or negligence and several that 
involve failure to comply with the regula- 
tions. 

The Chief Inspector may not revoke a 
welder's certificate until he has held a hear- 
ing, nor may he suspend it for more than 
30 days. A welder whose certificate has been 
revoked may not be issued a new one 
unless the Advisory Board approves. 

The regulations contain requirements with 
respect to welder's qualification tests. It is 
compulsory, as formerly, for a welder to 
apply annually to the Chief Inspector for a 
retest. He may, however, have his certif- 
icate renewed by the Chief Inspector, 
without a retest, for a further 12 months, if 
he submits documentary proof that he has 
been engaged in the installation and repair 
of boilers, pressure vessels and pressure 
piping for nine of the twelve months 
immediately preceding his application. Such 
a welder may not go longer than 24 months 
without a retest, however. On the recom- 
mendation of an inspector, the Chief In- 
spector may also waive the annual test if a 
welder has been engaged continuously in 
the manufacture of boilers and pressure ves- 
sels and his proficiency and quality of work 
are superior. 

Tests may also be arranged on the job- 
site at the employee's request. In addition, 
an inspector may request a welder to per- 
form a test before a repair is made. 

Where a welder fails a qualification test, 
he may take an immediate retest by making 
two test welds of each type for each posi- 
tion on which he has failed, all of which 
must pass the test requirements. If he fails 
the retest, he may take another test after 
he has had additional training or experience 
satisfactory to the Chief Inspector. 

A new candidate for a Grade A welder's 
certificate or a person whose certificate has 
lapsed for three years must pass a written 
examination before he may take the practical 
test. The regulations specify the subject 



matter on which the written test will be 
based. The welder may select his practical 
test from those shown in the appendices 
to these regulations, or he may be tested in 
accordance with a fabricator's procedure 
that has been approved by the Chief In- 
spector. The test for a Grade P certificate 
must be in accordance with the A.S.A. 
Code B31-8-1958. 

As well as taking the prescribed pre- 
cautions against fire, the welder and the 
fabricator are required to see that electrical 
connections and cables are in good order. 

Any defects are to be reported to the 
supervisor, who must have them remedied 
at once. 

British Columbia Factories Act 

December 26 was declared a public holi- 
day for purposes of the British Columbia 
Factories Act by a proclamation gazetted 
November 16. This meant that, with cer- 
tain exceptions, factories had to remain 
closed on that day and no persons could 
be employed on the premises except with 
the permission of an inspector. 

British Columbia Gas Act 

British Columbia has issued new regula- 
tions under the Gas Act respecting gas 
fitters, contractors and dealers. Gazetted 
as B.C. Reg. 164/61 on November 2, they 
supersede B.C. Reg. 142/58. The regula- 
tions, as previously, set out requirements 
relating to the licensing of gas fitters, con- 
trol of contractors, dealer's records, and 
certificates of competency for inspectors. 

There are two main changes in the new 
regulations. They now provide for a Grade 
One and a Grade Two licence for gas fitters, 
instead of the former general licence. They 
also set out the Advisory Board's responsi- 
bilities in recommending persons for a gas 
fitter's licence, specifying requirements to 
which the Board must adhere in assessing 
the qualifications of applicants. 

Formerly, the holder of a general gas 
fitter's licence, working for a licensed con- 
tractor, could perform any of the duties of 
a gas fitter. Now, however, only the holder 
of a Grade Two licence is permitted to per- 
form all the functions of a gas fitter. 

The holder of a Grade One gas fitter's 
licence may install or repair appliances 
where the hourly input is less than 750,000 
British thermal units or where the gas pres- 
sure in the piping to which the appliance is 
connected does not exceed five pounds per 
square inch, gauge. He may also install or 
repair any piping or appliance under the 



80 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



supervision of a gas fitter who holds a 
Grade Two licence or with the written per- 
mission of the Chief Inspector. 

The regulations now state that the 
Advisory Board must not recommend any 
person for a Grade One gas fitter's licence 
without proof that he has four years 
experience as a gas fitter, plumber, or pipe 
fitter, including his period of apprenticeship, 
and has passed the examination prescribed 
by the Board. (These requirements are 
similar to those previously applicable to 
candidates for the general gas fitter's 
licence.) 

The Board must not recommend any 
person for a Grade Two gas fitter's licence 
unless he has held a Grade One licence for 
two years or is a professional engineer with 
two years' experience in the installation of 
appliances and has passed the prescribed 
examination. 

The Board is now given control over the 
issue without examination of provisional gas 
fitters' licences entitling the holder to per- 
form the functions endorsed on the licence. 
Previously, these licences could be issued 
at the discretion of the Chief Inspector. 

Provisions in the new regulations 
requiring the registration of contractors are 
similar in purpose to the licensing require- 
ments previously in effect. No contractor 
may install or repair gas equipment unless 
he has been issued a certificate of registra- 
tion by the Chief Inspector. The contractor, 
as before, must furnish a guarantee bond 
for $2,000. If the contractor fails to comply 
with an inspector's order, the Chief Inspec- 
tor may suspend his certificate of 
registration. 

Requirements in connection with dealers' 
records are similar to former provisions. 
The dealer must keep a record of appliances 
sold, which must show the name and 
address of the purchaser, the place of 
installation and the type and model number. 
He must forward to the Chief Inspector, at 
the beginning of each quarter, records per- 
taining to the preceding three months' sales. 
The new regulations do not contain the 
former provision that prohibited a dealer 
from selling or offering for sale an 
appliance without the seal of a testing 
agency. The Gas Code, however, requires 
all appliances to have such a seal, and for- 
bids their installation without it. 

Most of the requirements relating to 
certificates of competency are similar to 
those which they replace, providing, as 
before, for the issue of Grade A, Grade B, 
and Grade T certificates. The holder of a 
Grade A certificate may be appointed an 
inspector or local inspector; of a Grade B 



certificate, a local inspector; and of a Grade 
T certificate, a local inspector only for the 
municipality where he was so employed 
before April 1, 1956, The annual renewal 
of certificates of competency is no longer 
required. 

British Columbia Hours of Work Act 

The British Columbia Board of Industrial 
Relations issued its usual Christmas exemp- 
tion order for the mercantile industry, per- 
mitting employees in retail stores to work 
two hours in excess of the daily limit fixed 
by the Hours of Work Act on any two days 
during the two-week period ending Decem- 
ber 23, 1961. The order was gazetted 
November 30 as B.C. Reg. 176/61. 

British Columbia Workmen's Compensation Act 

The Logging Regulations under the 
British Columbia Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Act, which constitute the safety code 
for the logging industry in that province, 
have been revised and re-issued as special 
regulations (B.C. Reg. 157/61), replacing 
Sections 800 to 908 in the General Accident 
Prevention Regulations (B.C. Reg. 394/59). 

The new regulations contain ten main 
divisions: general rules, mobile yarding 
equipment, anchors, guys, rigging, falling 
and bucking, yarding and loading, signalling, 
transportation, and codes of signals. 

Major changes have been made in provi- 
sions relating to yarding equipment and sig- 
nalling. Several important requirements are 
now set out for a mobile yarder, defined as 
a portable device mounted upon wheels, 
tracks, or skids, and utilizing a vertical or 
generally vertical spar or tower to move 
logs by winch and lines. It is now necessary 
to affix to the base of the vertical spar or 
tower of each yarder a permanent notation 
stating: (1) the maximum diameter of main- 
line cables for which the unit is designed, 
the minimum size and number and place- 
ment of guylines, if required, and the place- 
ment and number of out-riggers, if required, 
which must be rigged to sustain the struc- 
ture at the breaking strength of the main 
line or upon failure of any one guy-line or 
any one out-rigger; (2) the limits of the 
angle of yarding; (3) the limits of any 
auxiliary equipment which may be safely 
affixed to the mobile yarder; (4) the name, 
address, and qualification of the person or 
firm who provided the foregoing data. 

The regulations also provide that unless 
a yarder bears the permanent notation 
referred to above, and is rigged to conform 
to the manufacturer's specifications, it must 
not be used. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



81 



A further provision requires that over- 
head protection and other appropriate barri- 
cades, so designed as to provide minimum 
interference with the operator's view, must 
be installed to protect the operator and con- 
trols of mobile yarders. 

In addition, the regulations specify that, 
during movement of the mobile yarder, the 
spar or tower must be lowered or supported 
so that stability of the machine is not 
impaired. 

With respect to signalling, the regulations 
now require that when signals are used to 
direct the operation of equipment, signal 
codes approved by the Workmen's Com- 
pensation Board must be used. All workmen 
who direct, operate, or are endangered by 
the movement of equipment must know the 
meaning of these signals. 

Each movement of equipment must be 
preceded by signals that are clear to the 
operator of the equipment and to all work- 
men who might be endangered by it; if an 
operator does not clearly understand a 
signal he must act as though it was a stop 
signal. Audible signals must be audible to 
all workmen who might be endangered by 
the movement of equipment. If voice signals 
are used, the operator, before movement of 
the equipment, must repeat the signal so that 
it is clear to all persons who might be 
endangered. 

The regulations provide that only a 
designated person may cause a signal to be 
given for the movement of equipment. He 
must ensure that no workman is endangered, 
not be otherwise occupied while he is direct- 
ing the movement, and be prepared to signal 
to stop. Any person may cause a stop signal 
to be given. 

The use of any signalling device that is 
defective or hazardous must be discon- 
tinued until it is properly repaired. All 
repairs ^Iterations, or other adjustments to 
a signalling device must be made by a 
competent person. 

The regulations further require that when 
a signalling device uses frequency tone or 
tones as part of the signal, their audio fre- 
quency must be marked on the outside of 
the case of the transmitter and receiver. An 
employer whose signalling device uses radio 
frequency transmission must, before using 
the equipment, ensure that it will not affect, 
or be affected by, any other signalling 
device already installed within a radius of 
ten miles. 



The new regulations contain revised codes 
of signals for high-lead logging and for 
skidder operations, together with a new 
code of signals for vehicle operations. 

A number of other new provisions have 
been incorporated into the regulations. One 
of these requires that, if it is impracticable 
to fell trees and snags within reach of 
landings, spars, or logging machines before 
yarding operations begin, a competent 
supervisor must direct other effective 
measures to protect the workmen. Pass 
lines must now be inspected before each 
use. 

Fallers and buckers must, if possible, be 
so located as to be able to assist each other 
in case of injury, and have an appropriate 
means of signalling. Also, fallers and 
buckers are now required to stop the chain 
of power-saws when moving from cut to 
cut. 

Another new provision obligates the 
faller to notify his immediate superior if a 
tree is not completely felled. The supervisor, 
in turn, must inform all workmen who might 
be endangered, and ensure that the tree is 
safely felled. 

New Brunswick Labour Relations Act 

An amendment to the rules of procedure 
of the New Brunswick Labour Relations 
Board dealing with the application of a 
union to replace another as bargaining 
agent before the normal time limits pre- 
scribed in the Act, approved by O.C. 
61-1099, was gazetted November 8 to take 
effect from date of publication. 

The Act provides that, except with the 
permission of the Board, a rival union may 
not apply for certification until 12 months 
after the date of certification of the bar- 
gaining agent if no collective agreement 
exists and, where a collective agreement is 
in force, not until 10 months of the term of 
the agreement have elapsed. 

The new regulation sets out the procedure 
to be followed when such permission is 
desired and prescribes the form to be used. 
Besides stating the claim that it has as 
members a majority of the employees in 
the bargaining unit, the applicant must state 
the reasons why consent to apply should be 
granted. Any intervener in replying must 
specifically admit or deny each statement 
made by the applicant. 



82 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE 



In a comparison of current unemployment 
insurance statistics with those for a previous 
period, consideration should be given to 
relevant factors other than numbers, such as 
the opening and closing of seasonal indus- 
tries, increase in area population, influence 
of weather conditions, and the general em- 
ployment situation. 

Claimants should not be interpreted either 
as "total number of beneficiaries" or "total 
job applicants". 



Monthly Report on Operation of 

the Unemployment Insurance Act 

Number of claimants for unemployment insurance benefit on October 31 up 17.2 
per cent from end of September figure but down 1 8.6 per cent from total at end 
of October 1960. Month's rise in initial claims somewhat greater than in 1960* 

Claimants t for unemployment insurance 
benefit on October 31 numbered 268,700. 
This number represented an increase of 
39,500, or 17.2 per cent, over the 229,200 
on September 29 but a decrease of 61,500, 
or 18.6 per cent, from the total of 330,200 
at the corresponding date last year. 

Eight out of ten of the additional claim- 
ants on October 31 were males. 

Initial and renewal claims for benefit dur- 
ing October amounted to 158,100, compared 
with 122,000 in September and 178,200 in 
October 1960. The proportion of initial 
claims rose slightly to 61 per cent during 
October from 57 per cent in September. In 
October 1960 it was 58 per cent. 

A rise in claims is usually associated with 
a more than proportionate increase in initial 
claims, but the increase in initial claims 
from September to October this year was 
somewhat greater than last year. 

The average weekly number of bene- 
ficiaries was estimated at 173,300 for 
October, unchanged from September but 
almost 53,000 below the 225,900 estimated 
for October 1960. 

Benefit payments totalled $17 million dur- 
ing October, $16 million in September, and 
$21 million in October 1960. 

The average weekly benefit payment was 
$23.52 in October, $23.22 in September and 
$22.86 in October 1960. 



At October 31, employers registered num- 
bered 344,505, an increase of 1,124 since 
September 30. 

Enforcement Statistics 

During October, 10,041 investigations 
were conducted by enforcement officers 
across Canada. Of these, 6,750 were spot 
checks of postal and counter claims to verify 
the fulfilment of statutory conditions and 
139 were miscellaneous investigations. The 
remaining 3,152 were investigations in con- 
nection with claimants suspected of making 
false statements to obtain benefits. 

Prosecutions were begun in 162 cases, 43 
against employers and 119 against claim- 
ants.* Punitive disqualifications as a result 
of claimants' making false statements or 
misrepresentations numbered 1,277.* 



Insurance Registrations 

Reports received from local offices of the 
Unemployment Insurance Commission for 
October show that insurance books or con- 
tribution cards had been issued to 4,750,845 
employees who had made contributions to 
the Unemployment Insurance Fund since 
April 1, 1961. 

•See Tables E-l to E-4 at back of this issue. 

t A claimant's unemployment register is placed in 
the "live file" at the local office as soon as the claim 
is forwarded for computation. As a result, the count 
of claimants at any given time inevitably includes 
some whose claims are in process. 



Unemployment Insurance Fund 

Revenue received in October totalled 
$29,356,750.29 compared with $27,731,- 
622.92 in September and $30,246,976.09 in 
October 1960. 

Benefits paid in October totalled $17,115,- 
047.91 compared with $16,082,314.72 in 
September and $20,650,922.40 in October 
1960. 

The balance in the Fund on October 31 
was $154,737,081.07; on September 30 it 
was $142,495,378.69; and on October 31, 
1960, it was $329,072,495.46. 

♦These do not necessarily relate to the investiga- 
tions conducted during this period. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



83 



Decisions of the Umpire under 

the Unemployment Insurance Act 



Decision CUB-1891, October 5, 1961 

{Translation) 

Summary of the Main Facts: The claim- 
ant, a married woman with two young 
children, filed an initial application for 
benefit at the local office of the Unemploy- 
ment Insurance Commission in Roberval, 
Que., on December 12, 1960, and was 
registered for employment as a salesclerk. 
She stated that she had worked as a secre- 
tary, at a salary of $18 a week, for the X. . . 
Co-operative, in Ste. Hedwidge, Que., from 
May 2 to December 10, 1960, when the 
cheese factory was closed. She added 
that she was available for work and that 
her mother could look after the children. 

On April 12, 1961, the local office noti- 
fied the claimant of employment as a 
domestic servant in a private home, in 
Roberval, Que. It was a daytime job, at 
a salary of $18 for a week of about 54 
hours. The distance from the place of 
employment to the claimant's home was 
eight miles and the cost of transportation by 
taxi was $2. The prevailing rate of pay in 
the district for this type of work was $15 a 
week. 

The claimant refused this employment for 
the following reasons: "I refuse the employ- 
ment that you have offered me. Servant in 
a private home, this work I have never 
done. My last job was secretary for the 
X . . . Cooperative." 

The local office's comment was: "Other 
chances of employment unlikely." 

On April 20, 1961, the insurance officer 
disqualified the claimant from receipt of 
benefit for the period from April 9, 1961 to 
May 20, 1961, under section 59(1) of the 
Unemployment Insurance Act, for having 
refused, without good cause, to apply for 
a situation in suitable employment after 
having been informed that such situation 
was vacant or was about to become vacant. 

On April 27, 1961, the claimant appealed 
to a board of referees in a letter, which 
reads as follows: 

I appeal to the board of referees against 
the disqualification from receipt of unemploy- 
ment insurance benefit. My reasons: first of all, 
I was offered employment as a servant in a 
private home, which work I have never done 
other than in my own home. I have worked 
as a secretary, grocery clerk and bakery 
assistant. In addition, this employment is 
situated outside of my locality and having two 
children I have to be at home in the evenings. 
Moreover, I believe that a servant's pay is 



about the same as I would have to give to 
have someone look after my children. It seems 
to me that I had a perfect right to receive 
unemployment insurance benefit. 

The claimant was not present when the 
board of referees met at Alma on May 31, 
1961. The majority of the board dismissed 
the appeal for the reasons that "the employ- 
ment offered on April 12, 1961, as a 
domestic servant was at the same rate of 
pay as she had earned previously and that 
the place of work was only a distance of 
eight miles from her home, so, therefore, 
she should have at least given this work a 
trial and should have accepted it in view 
of the aforementioned circumstances, and 
perhaps the real reason for her refusal is 
that she is the mother of two children and 
that she could only be available by leaving 
her locality with difficulty." 

The dissenting member of the board ex- 
pressed the following opinion: 

The job offered on April 12, 1961, was not 
suitable for the following reasons: 

The claimant has never been a domestic 
servant, but she has worked as a secretary, 
as a grocery clerk, and as a baker's assistant. 

As this claimant resides in the vicinity of 
a large town in the region, Roberval, where 
she could obtain employment in her own line 
of work and as she would be able to return 
to her own home each evening to attend to 
her household work, as is mentioned in Ex- 
hibit 5, I am of the opinion that, for all of 
these reasons, the employment offered was not 
suitable and that the claimant had a good 
reason to refuse it. 

The claimant filed an appeal with the 
Umpire on lune 20, 1961, for the same 
reasons as she had given in her appeal to 
the board of referees and on the same 
grounds as contained in the statement of 
the dissenting member of the board of 
referees. 

Considerations and Conclusions: Section 
59(3) of the Act provides that after a lapse 
of a reasonable interval from the date on 
which an insured person becomes unem- 
ployed, employment other than that in his 
usual occupation is suitable "if it is 
employment at a rate of earnings not 
lower and on conditions not less favourable 
than those observed by agreement between 
employees and employers or, in the absence 
of any such agreement, than those recog- 
nized by good employers." 

The claimant had been unemployed for 
four months when the local office notified 
her of the employment in question. That, 
in my opinion, is "a reasonable interval" 



84 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



within the meaning of the above quoted 
section. As to the rate of pay, it was, accord- 
ing to the evidence on file, slightly higher 
than the prevailing rate in the district for 
that type of work. 

The cost of transportation and the engag- 
ing of someone to look after the children 
were circumstances to which, according to 
the established jurisprudence, it was incum- 
bent upon the claimant to find a solution 
which would conform with the conditions of 
the labour market in her district. 

For these reasons, I decide to dismiss 
the claimant's appeal. 

Decision CUB-1894, October 5, 1961 

Summary of the Main Facts: The claim- 
ant, who resides at Reserve Mines, N.S., 
filed an initial application for benefit at 
the National Employment Office at Glace 
Bay, N.S., on April 25, 1960, and was 
registered for employment as a miner. 
According to the applicant, he had worked 
for the E . . . Coal Company, Glace Bay, 
N.S., from 1922 to April 23, 1960, when 
he became separated from his employment 
because of a mass layoff. He was employed 
as a miner at Colliery No. 20 and his rate 
of pay was $11.54 a day. 

According to the claimant's "Unemploy- 
ment Register," he worked intermittently 
after he filed his application for benefit on 
April 25, 1960. 

In a Report of Possible Disqualification 
dated May 3, 1961, addressed to the 
insurance officer, the manager of the Com- 
mission's office in Glace Bay, stated: 

. . . During the week of 26 March, No. 20 
Colliery did not work on Monday, 27 March, 
because of a snow storm which blocked all 
roads. The Colliery worked on 28, 29, 30 
March, however, but the claimant did not 
report for work because, as he stated, he was 
snowed in. 

In payment interview on 7 April, 1961, [the 
claimant] was deducted 3 days, amounting to 
$15 for the days he did not report for work. 
This deduction he now questions, as can be 
seen by letter of 2 May . . . 

The insurance officer notified the claimant 
by letter on May 4, 1961, that he was dis- 
qualified and that the benefit was suspended 
for the three days, March 28, 29 and 30, 
1961, because he had not proved that he was 
unable to find suitable employment, as 
required by section 54(2) (b) of the Act, 
in that he did not report for work when 
work was available. 

The claimant appealed to a board of 
referees and contended that he was unable 
to obtain transportation from his home 
to the colliery during the week of March 
26 to April 1, 1961. According to the 
record, the claimant resides about six miles 
from the colliery. 



A board of referees heard the case in 
Sydney, N.S., on May 24, 1961. The claim- 
ant was represented at the hearing by D. J. 
Mclsaac, Sub-District Board Member, 
United Mine Workers of America. The 
board, by a unanimous decision, dismissed 
the appeal. The decision reads: 

... It is quite clear that the employer, because 
of weather conditions referred to above, did 
not expect the employees to report for work 
on 28, 29 & 30 March. It also follows that 
since he did not report for work, naturally 
he was not paid for those days. By the same 
reasoning, it would appear that on 28, 29 & 
30 March, due to weather conditions in the 
area, the claimant would not be in a position 
to be available for any work that was offered 
to him. After reviewing the submissions and 
upon hearing Mr. Mclsaac, the Board is of 
the opinion that the claimant has failed to 
prove that he was unable to obtain suitable 
employment on 28, 29 & 30 March, 1961. In 
other words, on the days in question there was 
work available for the claimant but due to 
circumstances over which he had no control, 
he was unable to accept the said employment . . . 

District 26, United Mine Workers of 
America, of which the claimant is a mem- 
ber, appealed to the Umpire and stated: 

...During the weekend of March 25, 1961, 
the Glace Bay area was subjected to series of 
severe snow storms and on Sunday evening, 
March 26, another snow storm completely 
paralyzed all transportation and forced the 
mine operators to announce all of their mines 
would be unable to operate on Monday, 
March 27. 

On Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 
March 28, 29 and 30, No. 20 Colliery, where 
[the claimant] is employed, worked with a 
reduced work force comprised mainly of work- 
men living adjacent to the colliery who walked 
to their work, and in other cases, workmen 
who were able to get transportation if living 
alon» the main town streets. 

[The claimant], living some six miles from 
his place of work, had no opportunity of 
getting transportation as the bus line conveying 
him and others in his community to and from 
work was rendered useless as the snow re- 
moval equipment was unable to cope with the 
snow problem from March 27th to March 
31st, 1961 ... 

We are of the opinion [the claimant] was 
unemployed within the meaning of the Act 
as he made every reasonable attempt to present 
himself for employment on the dates men- 
tioned. 

On behalf of the insurance officer, the 
Chief of the Adjudication Division of the 
Unemployment Insurance Commission sub- 
mitted a statement of observations for con- 
sideration by the Umpire, which reads: 

1. When the insurance officer made his 
decision on 4 May, 1961, the evidence that the 
claimant was not able to get to work consisted 
only of his own statement that he was snowed 
in and could not get transportation. The insur- 
ance officer was not impressed by this statement, 
particularly as the mine was operated on the 
three days involved and the other employees 
appeared to be at work. He, therefore, declared 
that the claimant was disqualified under Section 
54 (2) of the Act because he had failed to 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



85 



prove that he was unable to obtain suitable 
employment as required by paragraph (b) of 
this Section. 

2. On the more detailed information given 
by the union representative at the hearing 
before the board of referees, the board was 
satisfied that the claimant was, in fact, unable 
to accept work on these three days. It could 
be argued that he was consequently unable to 
obtain suitable employment within the meaning 
of paragraph (b) of Section 54 (2) of the Act. 
However, as a consequence of this finding of 
fact, the board also found that the claimant 
was, in fact, not available for work as required 
by paragraph (a) of Section 54(2) of the Act. 

3. This finding of the Board that the claimant 
was not available for work is in accordance 
with the jurisprudence established, as a claimant 
is not available for work if he is not able 
to avail himself immediately of any oppor- 
tunity of suitable employment. The board of 
referees, having accepted the fact that the 
claimant was prevented from immediately 
accepting work, necessarily found as a con- 
sequence that he was not available for work. 

4. On the facts in this case, it is clear that 
the claimant was not entitled to benefit for 
the three days in question, as he failed to 
meet the requirements of either paragraph (a) 
or paragraph (b) of Section 54 (2) of the Act. 

In a letter dated August 25, 1961, 
addressed to the Manager of the National 
Employment Office, Glace Bay, N.S., D. J. 
Mclsaac, Board Member of the United 
Mine Workers of America, stated: 

... In the material a letter signed by Mr. 
G. I. Shearer [Chief of the Adjudication Divi- 
sion of the Commission] indicated any addi- 
tional material the Union would like to submit 
would be included in the submission to the 
Umpire. We would like to make two additional 
observations that were not set out in detail in 
the original submission: 

During the week in question, March 27 to 
March 30, No. 20 Colliery had a working force 
on the following basis ... On Monday, March 
27 the Colliery was completely idle due to the 
storm. On Tuesday, March 28, on the three 



shifts — namely 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 4 p.m. to 
12 midnight; and 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. — the total 
shifts were 692. On Wednesday, March 29, 
the total for the same cycle was 826; and on 
Thursday, March 30, the total amount of 
shifts was 821. The normal number of shifts 
on the same schedule would be approximately 
1,150 shifts for the complete cycle. 

We are using these figures to show the storm 
blocked roads were responsible for the reduced 
work force at No. 20 Colliery where [the 
claimant] is employed. 

We are enclosing a statement from Mr. 

G , who operates a bus service in the 

area. 

The statement from Mr. G reads 

as follows: 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

THIS IS TO CERTIFY that I, G , run 

a regular bus service for the miners employed 

in No. 20 and No. 26 Collieries, [E Coal 

Co. Ltd.], Glace Bay, and that from March 27, 
1961 to March 30, 1961, I was unable to 
operate due to a heavy storm and the roads 
in the area being impassable. 

Considerations and Conclusions: The ques- 
tion at issue in the present case is not 
whether the claimant has proved that the 
weather conditions were such as to have 
prevented him from reporting at his regular 
place of employment on March 28, 29 and 
30, 1961, but whether he has proved that 
those conditions were not so severe as to 
have precluded him from going to work 
elsewhere on those days. 

As the evidence adduced by the claimant 
shows that the weather conditions were so 
severe, I consider that he has failed to 
prove that he was available for work within 
the meaning of section 54 (2) (a) of the 
Act on the days in question. 

I consequently decide to dismiss the 
union's appeal. 



Industrial Fafalife 

{Continued from page 41) 

of this year resulted in 42 deaths: 27 in 
metal mining, 8 in coal mining and 7 in 
non-metallic mineral mining. 

The 20 fatalities in logging represented 
a decrease of 5 from the 25 recorded dur- 
ing the same period last year and an increase 
of 5 from the 15 listed during the second 
quarter of this year. 

An analysis of the 231 fatalities during 
the third quarter (see chart page 42) shows 
that 69 (30 per cent) were caused by being 
"struck by" different objects: 50 were in 
the category "other" objects, 13 were caused 
by "moving vehicles" and 6 were the result 
of being struck by "tools, machinery, cranes, 
etc.". Forty-eight fatalities were caused by 
"falls and slips"; all but five were caused 
by falls to different levels. 



Thirty-five fatalities were under the head- 
ing "collisions, wrecks, derailments, etc."; 
19 involved automobiles and trucks, eight 
involved aircraft and four involved tractors 
and loadmobiles. Twenty-eight fatalities 
were the result of being "caught in, on or 
between". Of these, ten involved tractors 
and loadmobiles, machinery and hoisting 
and conveying apparatus were involved in 
five each and automobiles and trucks in 
four. 

By province of occurrence, the largest 
number of fatalities was in Ontario, where 
there were 88. In British Columbia, there 
were 44; in Quebec, 30, and in Alberta, 24. 

During the quarter, there were 77 fatali- 
ties in July, 86 in August and 68 in 
September. 



86 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



LABOUR CONDITIONS IN FEDERAL 
GOVERNMENT CONTRACTS 



Wage Schedules Prepared and Contracts Awarded during November 
Works of Construction, Remodelling, Repair or Demolition 

During November the Department of Labour prepared 247 wage schedules for inclusion 
in contracts proposed to be undertaken by departments of the federal Government and its 
Crown corporations in various areas of Canada, for works of construction, remodelling, 
repair or demolition. In the same period, a total of 125 contracts in these categories was 
awarded. Particulars of these contracts appear below. In addition 129 contracts not listed 
in this report and which contained the General Fair Wages Clause were awarded by 
Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation and the Departments of Defence Production, 
Northern Affairs and National Resources and Public Works. 

A copy of the wage schedule issued for each contract is available on request to trade 
unions concerned or to others who have a bona fide interest in the execution of the contract. 

(The labour conditions included in each of the contracts listed under the heading provide 
that: 

(a) the wage rate for each classification of labour shown in the wage schedule included 
in the contract is a minimum rate only and contractors and subcontractors are not exempted 
from the payment of higher wages in any instance where, during the continuation of the work, 
wage rates in excess of those shown in the wage schedule have been fixed by provincial 
legislation, by collective agreements in the district, or by current practice; 

(b) hours of work shall not exceed eight in the day and 44 in the week, except in 
emergency conditions approved by the Minister of Labour; 

(c) overtime rates of pay may be established by the Minister of Labour for all hours 
worked in excess of eight per day and 44 per week; 

(d) no person shall be discriminated against in regard to employment because of his 
race, national origin, colour or religion, nor because he has made a complaint with respect 
to alleged discrimination.) 

Contracts for the Manufacture of Supplies and Equipment 

Contracts awarded in November for the manufacture of supplies and equipment were 
as follows: 

Department No. of Contracts Aggregate Amount 

Central Mortgage & Housing Corporation 1 $ 817.70 

Defence Production 176 1,427,550.00 

Post Office 5 200,731.00 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 3 29,768.25 



The Fair Wages and Hours of Labour These wage schedules are thereupon in- 
legislation of the federal Government has eluded with other relevant labour condi- 
the purpose of insuring that all Government tions as terms of such contracts to be 
contracts for works of construction and for observed by the contractors, 
the manufacture of supplies and equipment Wage schedules are not included in con- 
contain provisions to secure the payment of tracts for the manufacture of supplies and 
wages generally accepted as fair and reason- equipment because it is not possible to 
able in each trade or classification employed determine in advance the classification to 
in the district where the work is being per- be employed in the execution of a contract, 
formed. A statement of the labour conditions which 

The practice of Government departments must be observed in every such contract 

and those Crown corporations to which the is however, included therein and is of the 

legislation applies, before entering into con- same nature and effect as those which apply 

tracts for any work of construction, re- in works of construction, 

modelling, repair or demolition, is to obtain Copies of the federal Government's Fair 

wage schedules from the Department of Wages and Hours of Labour legislation 

Labour showing the applicable wage rate may be had upon request to the Industrial 

for each classification of workmen deemed Relations Branch of the Department of 

to be required in the execution of the work. Labour, Ottawa. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 87 



(The labour conditions included in contracts for the manufacture of supplies and equip- 
ment provide that: 

(a) all persons who perform labour on such contracts shall be paid such wages as are 
currently paid in the district to competent workmen; and if there is no current rate, then 
a fair and reasonable rate; but in no event shall the wages paid be less than those established 
by the laws of the province in which the work is being performed; 

(b) the working hours shall be those fixed by the custom of the trade in the district, 
or if there be no such custom, then fair and reasonable hours; 

(c) overtime rates of pay may be established by the Minister of Labour for all hours 
worked in excess of those fixed by custom of the trade in the district, or in excess of fair 
and reasonable hours; 

(d) no person shall be discriminated against in regard to employment because of his 
race, national origin, colour or religion, nor because he has made a complaint with respect 
to alleged discrimination.) 

Wage Claims Received and Payments Made during November 

During November the sum of $2,557.66 was collected from nine contractors for wage 
arrears due their employees as a result of the failure of the contractors, or their sub- 
contractors, to apply the wage rates and other conditions of employment required by the 
schedule of labour conditions forming part of their contract. This amount is for distribution 
to the 23 workers concerned. 

Contracts Containing Fair Wage Schedules Awarded during November 

(The labour conditions of the contracts marked (*) contain the General Fair Wages 
Clause providing for the observance of current or fair and reasonable rates of wages and 
hours of labour not in excess of eight per day and 44 per week, and also empower the 
Minister of Labour to deal with any question which may arise with regard thereto.) 

Department of Agriculture 

near Elbow Sask: Sanderson & Elgert, construction of highway from Tichfield to 
No 15 Highway, South Saskatchewan River Project, near Outlook Sask: Peter Kiewit Sons 
Co of Canada Ltd, Al Johnson Construction Co of Canada Ltd, Poole Construction Co 
Ltd, construction of control shaft substructure for tunnels for South Saskatchewan River 
Dam. 

Atomic Energy of Canada Limited 

Chalk River Ont: F Sanzo & Co, masonry work, extension to library, Bldg 432. 

Department of Citizenship and Immigration 

Bruce Indian Agency Ont: Everett Brown, construction of three houses, Cape Croker 
IR. Clandeboye Indian Agency Man: Lome W Lester, road construction, Brokenhead 
Indian Reserve. Hobbema Indian Agency Alta: Wetaska Construction Co Ltd, installation 
of public washrooms & renovations to Agency Office Bldg. 

Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation 

Gander Nfld: J A MacQuarrie, changes to electrical wiring of 110 housing units. 
Summerside P E I: Eastern Landscaping Co Ltd, site improvement for school extension 
(DND 4/59 & DND 5/60). Greenwood N S: M F Schurman Co Ltd, construction of 
school (DND 11/60) & school extension (DND 13/61). Deep River Ont: Flordia Land- 
scaping Co, site improvement for staff hotel cafeteria (AECL 28/59). North Bay Ont: 
Bell City Contracting Co, clearing underbrush & small trees, urban Military Housing 
Project. Shilo Man: Inter-City Gas Ltd, relocation of gas lines at housing units (DND 
4/61). 

In addition, the Corporation awarded six contracts containing the General Fair Wages 
Clause. 

Defence Construction (1951) Limited 

Bagotville Que: North Shore Builders Ltd, extension of runway, RCAF Station. 
Arnprior Ont: Delphis Cote Ltd, reroofing of hangar, Airport. Trenton Ont: Power Line 
Construction Ltd, rehabilitation of electrical distribution system, No 6 Repair Depot. 
Cold Lake Alta: Fraser & Rice Construction Ltd. extension & modification to synthetic 
trainer bldg, RCAF Station. Royal Roads B C: Farmer Construction Ltd, alterations to 
Bldg No 6. Whitehorse Y T: Dawson & Hall Ltd, construction of three bldgs & alterations 
& addition to garage, Camp Takhini. Various locations: Eight contracts in the restricted 
category. 

88 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



Building and Maintenance 

Quebec City Que: Nordbec Construction Inc, warning siren installation. Barriefield 
Ont: H J Gascoigne Ltd, reroofing of Bldg B-38, RCEME School. Niagara Falls, Port 
Colborne, Welland, Fort Erie, Chippawa, Ridgeway, Crystal Beach & Fonthill Ont: Nager 
Electric (Canada) Ltd, warning siren installations. Oakville, Georgetown, Bronte, Burling- 
ton & Milton Ont: Black & McDonald Ltd, warning siren installations. Fort Churchill Man: 
Silverline Mfg Co Ltd, construction of two steel water tanks. Victoria, Oak Bay, Esquimalt, 
Saanich, Sidney, Colwood, Shawnigan Lake, Sooke & Duncan B C: Hume & Rumble Ltd, 
warning siren installations. 

Department of Defence Production 

Cornwallis N S: Victor Carter, replacement of windows, Bldgs 28, 55 & 56. HMCS 
Cornwallis: Chas Dargie & Son Ltd, repairs to floors of Bldgs Nos 12 & 41-1, HMCS 
Cornwallis; Hazelwood Bros, interior painting of Bldg 39-1, HMCS Cornwallis; Rodney 
Contractors Ltd, furring & cladding exterior walls of Bldgs #34-5 & 34-6, HMCS Cornwallis. 
Shearwater N S: Twin City Steeplejack & Building Maintenance Co, interior painting of 
Bldg #4, RCN Air Station. Sydney N S: Chappell's Ltd, roof repairs, Bldg No 6-1, Point 
Edward Naval Base; Eastern Co-Op Services Ltd, roof repairs, Bldg No 6-2, Point Edward 
Naval Base. Camp Gagetown N B: Richards-Wilcox Canadian Co Ltd, supply & installation 
of eight super-way doors, etc. Dorval Que: Eagle Paving Co Ltd, asphalt paving, Airport. 
Valcartier Que: Cara Development Corp Ltd, interior painting, Camp. Esquimalt B C.- 
Pacific Sheet Metal Works Ltd, supply & installation of heating & ventilating systems in 
Bldg No 86A, Tri-Service Band School, HMCS Naden. Royal Roads B C: G H Wheaton 
Ltd, supply & installation of fire doors, etc. 

In addition, this Department awarded 64 contracts containing the General Fair Wages 
Clause. 

Department of Justice 

Joyceville Ont: Leslie Stratford Cut Stone & Construction Co Ltd, construction of 
canning plant bldg #50, Joyceville Institution; Frost Steel & Wire Co Ltd, supply & installa- 
tion of chain link security fence, Joyceville Institution. 

National Harbours Board 

Montreal Que: J G Fitzpatrick Ltd, construction of abutment & piers for additional 
ramp from St Helen's Island to Jacques Cartier Bridge; Standard Electric Co Inc, conduit 
installation, Section 3, Champlain Bridge. Three Rivers Harbour Que: Williams Construc- 
tion Co Ltd, construction of extension, Shed No 10. 

Department of Northern Affairs and National Resources 

Cape Breton Highlands National Park N S: Delta Electric Co Ltd, construction of 
power distribution system including trailer outlets & street lighting, Broad Cove Camp- 
ground. Kootenay National Park B C: C J Oliver Ltd, construction of administration bldg. 

In addition, this Department awarded five contracts containing the General Fair 
Wages Clause. 

Department of Public Works 

St. John's Nfld: E Miller, alterations & addition, Marshall Bldg. Ellerslie P E I: 
Edmond A Arsenault, construction of marine railway. Bailey's Brook N S: Colin R Mac- 
Donald Ltd, wharf repairs. Bedford Basin N S: T C Gorman (Nova Scotia) Ltd, installa- 
tion of rubber tired floating fenders, Bedford Institute of Oceanography. Broad Cove 
Marsh N S: Albert MacDonald, breakwater repairs. Cape Breton Highlands National 
Park N S: Trynor Construction Co Ltd, resurfacing of road, Effie's Brook to Neil's Harbour. 
Halifax & area N S: Streakless Window Services Ltd, cleaning windows of federal bldgs. 
Halifax N S: Mathews Conveyor Co Ltd, supply & installation of mechanical mail handling 
equipment, federal bldg. La Have N S: Mosher & Rawding Ltd, wharf reconstruction. 
Malagash N S: Colin R MacDonald Ltd, wharf improvements. Parker's Cove N S: Hamp- 
ton Construction Co, breakwater repairs. Pictou N S: Ferguson Industries Ltd, replacement 
of boiler & boiler house. West Arichat N S: Gerald Forgeron, breakwater repairs. Yar- 
mouth N S: Kenney Construction Co Ltd, harbour improvements. Centreville N B: G R 
Wort, construction of post office bldg. Lameque N B: Comeau & Savoie Construction Ltd, 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 89 



repairs to North approach. St George N B: Clumac Construction Ltd, construction of 
RCMP detachment quarters. West Saint John N B: Maritime Waterproofing & Contract- 
ing Co Ltd, alterations & repairs, Customs & Immigration Bldg. Grande Vallee Que: Eloie 
Boulay, jetty reconstruction. Lac Maurier Que: G A Crowe Construction, construction of 
wharf. Marieville Que: Boulais & Freres, alterations & addition to federal bldg. Montreal 
Que: J R Robillard Ltd, construction of canteen, Customs & Immigration Bldg, 400 
Youville Square. Portneuf Que: Construction Mauriceienne Inc, wharf improvements. 
Quebec City Que: Alfred Maron, Enr, disembarkment & tunnel exit waterproofing, Cham- 
plain Harbour Station platform. Cobourg Ont: Ruliff Grass Construction Co Ltd, construc- 
tion of water gauge station. Collingwood Ont: Bermingham Construction Ltd, construction 
of mooring stations. Innisfil Park Ont: Con-Bridge Ltd, wharf repairs. Kingston Ont: 
Friendship Construction Co Ltd, replacement of windows, UIC Bldg. Leamington Ont: 
J S Thornton, renovations & alterations, old Federal Bldg. Ottawa Ont: Doran Construction 
Co (1960) Ltd, alterations to Blackburn Bldg; Proulx Electric, improvements to lighting 
system in certain areas of No 2 Temporary Bldg, Wellington St; Thos Fuller Con- 
struction (1958) Co Ltd, supply & installation of system of underground mains & 
hydrants, Eldorado Mining & Refining Ltd, Tunney's Pasture; A Bruce Benson Ltd, altera- 
tions to 4th floor, "C" wing, RCMP Headquarters. Port Burwell Ont: Dean Construction 
Co Ltd, construction of fishermen's wharf. Toronto Ont: Casmer J Dubiel, removal of 
ashes, garbage & waste paper from federal bldgs. Jack River Man: Kraft Construction Co 
Ltd, construction of school with Arts & Home Economics rooms (Norway House Indian 
Agency). Blaine Lake Sask: H P Friedrich, construction of post office bldg. Choiceland 
Sask: C M Miners Construction Co Ltd, construction of post office bldg. Delisle Sask: 
Horosko Construction Co Ltd, construction of post office bldg. Duck Lake Sask: Maguire 
Construction Ltd, construction of school & family residences, Duck Lake Agency. Jansen 
Sask: Holterman Construction, construction of post office bldg. Lloydminster Sask: Lloyd 
Construction Co Ltd, alterations to federal bldg. Meadow Lake Agency Sask: HDP 
Construction Ltd, construction of school with gymnasium & duplex residence, Beauval IRS. 
North Portal Sask: N J Kuster, construction of quarantine station for Department of 
Agriculture. Regina Sask: Beattie Ramsay Construction Co Ltd, renewal of water mains 
& affiliated works, RCMP barracks; McDiarmid Construction Ltd, alterations to Mother- 
well Bldg. Saskatoon Sask: Modern Building Cleaning Service of Canada Ltd, cleaning 
interior of federal bldg. Theodore Sask: Kowalishen Construction, construction of post 
office bldg. Jasper Alta: Lance Construction Ltd, alterations & repairs to RCMP detach- 
ment quarters. Jasper National Park Alta: Crawley & Mohr Ltd, construction of Athabasca 
River Bridge & approaches, Mile 139.2, Banff-Jasper Highway. Lesser Slave Lake Agency 
Alta: St Laurent Construction Ltd, construction of school, Namew Lake. Campbell River 
B C: Franklin Electric Ltd, installation of light & power system on floats. North Vancouver 
B C: Coronation Construction Co Ltd, replacement of wood sash with aluminum sash, 
federal bldg. Oliver B C: Alexander Faulds, cleaning interior of federal bldg. Prince George 
B C: Thompson Construction Co Ltd, alterations to federal bldg. Secret Cove B C: 
Greenlees Piledriving Co Ltd, float renewal. Surge Narrows B C: L K Creelman Co Ltd, 
float reconstruction. Vancouver B C: McKenzie Barge & Derrick Co Ltd, improvements 
& repairs to North Arm Jetty, mouth of Fraser River. 

In addition, this Department awarded 54 contracts containing the General Fair Wages 
Clause. 

The St. Lawrence Seaway Authority 

Beauharnois Que: Pentagon Construction Co Ltd, extension to upper south entrance 
wall, Upper Beauharnois lock, Central District, St Lawrence Seaway. St Catharines Ont: 
Duo-Temp (Niagara) Ltd, supply & installation of aluminum awnings for linesmen's bldgs, 
Welland Canal; Beamer-Lathrop Ltd, repair & modifiction of segmental & track girders 
of rolling lift bridges across Welland Canal; Drope Paving & Construction Co Ltd, paving, 
west canal road, Welland Canal. 

Department of Transport 

Bonavista Nfld: Davis Construction Ltd, improvements to station bldgs. Egg Esland 
N S: Graeme A Stuart, erection of steel lighthouse tower. Halifax N S: Steen Mechanical 
Contractors Ltd, provision of water supply main, sewage disposal main, steam main, 
extensions for TCA hangar & associated work, International Airport. Alma Que: Airport 
Installations Co, construction of lighting facilities, Airport. LaPasse Dangereuse Que: The 

(Continued on page 96) 
90 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



PRICES AND THE COST OF LIVING 



Consumer Price Index, December 1961 

The consumer price index (1949 = 100) 
rose 0.1 per cent to 129.8 from 129.7 
between November and December 1961.*. 

Increases in the component indexes for 
food, housing, and health and personal care 
offset decreases in the clothing and trans- 
portation indexes. The recreation and read- 
ing, and tobacco and alcohol indexes were 
unchanged. 

For the year 1961, the index averaged 
129.2, up by 0.9 per cent from the 1960 
average of 128.0. 

The food index rose 0.7 per cent to 
124.5 from 123.6, as price increases 
occurred for beef, chicken, turkey and 
most fresh fruits and vegetables. Lower 
prices were reported for eggs, grapefruit, 
pork and powdered skim milk. 

The housing index increased 0.1 per cent 
to 133.8 from 133.7 as both the shelter and 
household operation components were at 
slightly higher levels. In shelter, the rent 
index was unchanged and the home-owner- 
ship index was up 0.3 per cent. In household 
operation, the increase of 0.1 per cent 
reflected higher prices for furniture, floor 
coverings and textiles. 

The clothing index declined 0.3 per cent to 
113.7 from 114.0 as a result of lower 
prices for some items of men's, women's 
and children's wear, footwear and clothing 
services. 

The transportation index declined 0.3 per 
cent to 141.1 from 141.5 as a result of lower 
gasoline prices in several cities. 

The health and personal care index 
increased 0.1 per cent to 156.8 from 156.7; 
the health care component was up but the 
personal care component was unchanged. 
In health care, higher premiums in one 
province for pre-paid medical care were 
responsible for the upward movement. 

The recreation and reading, and tobacco 
and alcohol indexes were unchanged at 
146.3 and 117.3, respectively. 

City Consumer Price Indexes, November 1961 

Between October and November con- 
sumer price indexes (1949 = 100) for the 
ten regional cities experienced mixed move- 
ments: four increased, five decreased, and 

•See Table F-l at back of book. 



the other remained unchanged.* Increases 
ranged from 0.2 per cent in Winnipeg to 
0.4 per cent in Halifax and Vancouver; 
decreases ranged from 0.1 per cent in St. 
John's to 0.5 per cent in Toronto. The index 
for Saint John was unchanged. 

Food indexes declined in all cities except 
Halifax and Montreal where increases of 
0.7 per cent and 0.5 per cent respectively 
occurred. Decreases ranged from 0.1 per 
cent in Vancouver to 1.6 per cent in 
Ottawa. Shelter indexes were higher in 
seven cities, lower in two, and unchanged 
in the remaining one. Clothing indexes rose 
in six cities while remaining constant in 
four. Household operation indexes were 
higher in five cities, lower in one, and 
unchanged in the other four. There were 
eight higher indexes and two indexes 
unchanged in the other commodities and 
services group. 

Regional consumer price index point 
changes between October and November 
were as follows: Toronto —0.6 to 131.9; 
Saskatoon-Regina —0.4 to 126.4; Ottawa 
-0.3 to 131.8; Edmonton-Calgary -0.3 to 
125.7; St. John's —0.1 to 116.4t; Halifax 
+0.5 to 129.7; Vancouver +0.5 to 130.1; 
Montreal +0.4 to 130.8; Winnipeg +0.2 to 
128.9. Saint John remained unchanged at 
130.8. 

Wholesale Price Indexes, November 1961 

The general wholesale price index (1935- 
39 = 100) remained unchanged at 235.3 
between October and November 1961 as five 
group indexes rose slightly and three de- 
clined. In November 1960 the index was 
229.9. 

Group indexes that increased were: 
vegetable products, from 205.2 to 205.3; 
textile products, from 235.8 to 236.0; wood 
products, from 307.4 to 308.4; non-metallic 
minerals, from 185.5 to 185.8; and chemical 
products, from 189.8 to 190.0. 

Indexes that decreased were: animal 
products, from 256.6 to 256.5; iron 
products, from 258.8 to 257.9; and non- 
ferrous metals, from 186.9 to 186.2. 

The non-residential building materials 
price index (1949 = 100) moved up from 
130.5 to 130.6 between October and Novem- 
ber. The residential building materials price 



*See Table F-2 at back of book. 
tOn base June 1951=100. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



91 



CONSUMER PRICE INDEX 



Index 1949=100 



Index 1949=100 




index (1935-39: 
to 292.4; on the 
128.2. 



:100) rose from 291.4 
1949 base, from 127.8 to 



U.S. Consumer Price Index, November 1961 

The United States consumer price index 
(1947-49=100) declined slightly between 
mid-October and mid-November 1961, mov- 
ing from a record 128.4 to 128.3. In Novem- 
ber 1960 it was 127.4. The most important 
factor in the decline during the month was 
a half -point drop in food prices. 

The U.S. Bureau of Labour Statistics has 
announced that it would shift the index from 
the present 1947-49 base to a 1957-59 base, 



beginning with the report on the mid- 
January index. 

U.K. Index of Retail Prices, October 1961 

The United Kingdom index of retail 
prices (Jan. 17, 1956=100) rose from 
115.5 to 115.7 between mid-September and 
mid-October; the month before it had 
declined from 115.7 to 115.5. In October 
1960 it was 111.4. 

During the month, increases in prices of 
housing, many goods, and services — 
transportation, theatre admissions, hair- 
dressing, laundering — outweighed declines 
in food prices; the food index dropped 
almost 0.5 per cent. 



Collective Bargaining Review 

(Continued from page 26) 

negotiations with the Brotherhood of Loco- 
motive Engineers, and that the boards' 
recommendations would be implemented 
January 1, 1962. The board reports sug- 
gested an increase of 6+ per cent in 
engineers' wages over a three-year period 
and reductions in arbitrary allowances for 
duties made obsolete by diesel engines. The 
union committee, which had been seeking 
a 15-per-cent increase in basic rates, 
arbitraries and special allowances, did not 
accept the majority reports and went for- 
ward with a strike vote, which was expected 
to be completed late in January. 



On December 21, the 15 unions represent- 
ing 110,000 non-operating railway employees 
presented their demands to the C.N.R. and 
C.P.R. They were seeking a two-year con- 
tract with a wage increase of approxi- 
mately 22 cents an hour and a job security 
formula that would limit any reduction in 
the number of employees with five or more 
years' seniority to 1 per cent a year. For 
employees with less seniority, the unions 
proposed an S.U.B. plan. 

During the month, Canada Cement signed 
a two-year contract with the Cement 
Workers, thus ending a strike against four 
plants in Ontario and Quebec. 



92 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



Publications Recently Received 

in Department of Labour Library 



The publications listed below are not for 
sale by the Department of Labour. Persons 
wishing to purchase them should com- 
municate with the publishers. Publications 
listed may be borrowed by making applica- 
tion to the Librarian, Department of 
Labour, Ottawa. Students may apply 
through the library of their institution. 
Applications for loans should give the num- 
ber (numeral) of the publication desired 
and the month in which it was listed in the 
Labour Gazette. 

List No. 159 

Automation 

1. Bright, James Rieser. Myths and Fal- 
lacies of Automation. New York, Society of 
Automotive Engineers, 1957. Pp. 21. 

Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of 
the Society of Automotive Engineers, Detroit, 
January 14-18, 1957. 

The author studied the experiences of "13 
highly automatic production systems in a 
variety of industries." Examines eight state- 
ments that are often made about automation 
and points out that the statements are not 
wholly true. 

2. Governor's Conference on Auto- 
mation, Harvard University, 1960. Gover- 
nor's Conference on Automation, Graduate 
School of Business Administration, Harvard 
University, June 2 and 3, 1960. [Boston? 
1960] Pp. 40. 

Conference was called by Governor Foster 
Furcolo of Massachusetts. Speakers represented 
management, labour and government. 

Business 

3. National Industrial Conference 
Board. Chartbook of Current Business 
Trends. 1961 ed. rev. New York, 1961. 
Pp. 28. 

4. National Industrial Conference 
Board. Managing Company Cash, by Nor- 
man E. Pflomm. New York, 1961. Pp. 123. 

Describes several tested ways of using cash 
more efficiently and thus reducing operating 
costs and working capital requirements. 

Canada at Work Broadcasts 

The following nine talks were spon- 
sored and published by the Federal 
Department of Labour in Ottawa in 
1961. 

5. Blackburn, George G. Education and 
Employment. 5 parts. 

The speaker, Director of Information of the 
Federal Department of Labour, emphasized the 
need for students to acquire as much education 
as possible to secure a satisfactory position 
upon graduation. 



6. Campbell, Ian. Barriers can dis- 
appear. Pp. 5. 

The speaker, National Co-ordinator of Civi- 
lian Rehabilitation, Federal Department of 
Labour, and Chairman of the Interdepartmental 
Committee on Older Workers, talked about 
the older worker in industry. 

7. Canada. Department of Labour. 
Education and training. Pp. 4. 

A talk by the Prime Minister, Mr. Diefen- 
baker, on the important place of education 
and training today and in the future, followed 
by a talk by G. G. Blackburn. 

8. Canada. Department of Labour. A 
Matter of Progress. [A Dramatized Play on 
Discrimination]. Pp. 7. 

9. Douse, H. L. Let's eliminate Age Bar- 
riers in hiring. Pp. 5. 

The speaker, who is Chief of the Division on 
Older Workers of the Federal Department of 
Labour and Secretary of the Interdepartmental 
Committee on Older Workers, suggested how 
age barriers in hiring might be eliminated. 

10. Ford, I. W. // pays to graduate. 
Pp. 4. 

A talk about the importance of high school 
students' getting all the education and training 
they can. 

11. Murchison, C. A. L. National Em- 
ployment Service and the Older Worker. 
Pp. 4. 

The speaker, a Commissioner of the Unem- 
ployment Insurance Commission in Ottawa, 
told what the National Employment Service 
is doing to place older workers in jobs. 

12. Sutherland, W. L. // pays to 
graduate. Pp. 4. 

The speaker, who is general personnel 
manager of Massey-Ferguson Ltd., told why 
a high school student should graduate. 

13. Thrasher, Richard Devere. Com- 
monwealth Technical Training Week. Pp. 4. 

The speaker, who is Parliamentary Secretary 
to the Minister of Labour, talked about the 
objectives of Commonwealth Technical Train- 
ing Week, which publicizes the need of young 
people to get as much education as possible 
before leaving school. 

Economic Conditions 

14. British Columbia. Bureau of Eco- 
nomics and Statistics. The Kamloops 
Region; an Economic Survey, May, 1961. 
Victoria, 1961. Pp. 68. 

Contents: Synopsis of Major Economic 
Opportunities in the Kamloops Region. Trans- 
portation. Retail and Wholesale Trade. Electric 
Power. Recreation. Agriculture. Oil and Natural 
Gas Development. Mining. Forestry. Manu- 
facturing. 

15. Regina. Industrial Development 
Department. A Report of the Economic 
Development of the City of Regina. Regina, 
1961. Pp. 13. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



93 



Partial Contents: Population. Industrial 
Growth. Construction. Income Distribution. 
Cultural, Educational and Social Centre. Geo- 
graphical Area served by Regina. 

Employees' Benefit Plans 

16. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Health and Insurance Plans under Collec- 
tive Bargaining; Life Insurance and Acci- 
dental Death and Dismemberment Benefits, 
Early Summer 1960. Washington, GPO, 
1961. Pp. 23. 

17. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Health and Insurance Plans under Collective 
Bargaining; Major Medical Expense Bene- 
fits, Fall 1960. Washington, GPO, 1961. 
Pp. 80. 

"This study of major medical benefit features 
of health and insurance plans under collective 
bargaining, based on an analysis of 300 selected 
plans . . ." 

Industrial Disputes 

18. Crook, Wilfrid Harris. Communism 
and the General Strike. Hamden, Conn., 
Shoe String Press, 1960. Pp. 483. 

Discusses many general strikes, economic, 
political and revolutionary, such as the Seattle 
and Winnipeg Strikes of 1919, the British 
General Strike of 1926, the San Francisco 
Longshoremen's Strike of 1934, and others. 
Also shows how the Communist Party has used 
the general strike for its own purposes. 

19. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
The Dimensions of Major Work Stoppages, 
1947-59. Washington, GPO, 1961. Pp. 41. 

A study of work stoppages involving 10,000 
or more workers during the period 1947 to 
1959. 

Job Analysis and Specification 

20. Currie, Russel Mackenzie. Work 
Study. With a foreword by Ewart Smith. 
London, Pitman [1960, cl959] Pp. 232. 

This book is based on the author's experience 
and knowledge gained as Head of the Central 
Work Study Department of Imperial Chemical 
Industries Limited of Great Britain. This book 
is intended as a basic book on the subject 
covering all aspects of work study techniques. 

21. Roff, H. E. Job Analysis, by H. E. 
Roff and T. E. Watson. London, Institute of 
Personnel Management, 1961. Pp. 40. 

This booklet attempts "to give a brief sum- 
mary indicating where further information can 
be found; to indicate the importance of job 
analysis as a tool of personnel management; 
and to include some comments on practical 
points that are not easily found elsewhere." 

Labour Laws and Legislation 

22. International Association of Gov- 
ernmetal Labor Officials. Labor Laws 
and their Administration. Proceedings of the 
43rd Convention of the International As- 
sociation of Governmental Labor Officials, 
held in Detroit, Mich., Aug. 29-Sept. 1, 
1960. Washington, GPO, 1961. Pp. 182. 



23. Spielman, Lester. The Taft-Hartley 
Law: its Effect on the Growth of the Labor 
Movement. New York, International Ladies' 
Garment Workers' Union, 1961. Pp. 27. 

The author claims that labour union growth 
has been slower in the U.S. than in Canada in 
recent years. He blames the Taft-Hartley law 
for this slowdown in the U.S. 

24. U.S. Women's Bureau. State Hour 
Laws for Women. Rev. ed. Washington, 
GPO, 1961. Pp. 105. 

Covers the provisions of State hour laws 
for women as of October 1, 1960. Contains 
an analysis of the laws regulating daily and 
weekly hours of work, day of rest, meal and 
rest periods, and nightwork. 

Labour Supply 

25. Interstate Conference of Em- 
ployment Security Agencies. Proceedings 
of the Twenty-Fourth Annual Meeting, 
October 2-5, 1960, Las Vegas, Nevada. 
[Washington, Dept. of Labor, 1961?] 
Pp. 144. 

26. U.S. Bureau of Employment Secu- 
rity. Handbook on defining Labor Market 
Areas. Washington, GPO, 1960. Pp. 33. 

27. U.S. Department of Labor. Our 
Manpower Future, 1955-65; Population 
Trends, Their Manpower Implications. 
Washington, GPO, 1957. Pp. [32]. 

Pensions 

28. Ontario. Committee on Portable 
Pensions. Second Report. August, 1961. 
[Toronto, Department of Economics? 1961] 
Pp. 146. 

Reviews many phases of the Committee's 
inquiry into pensions and their portability. 
Gives the background information used by the 
Committee in making its report. 

29. Pilch, Michael. Pension Schemes, by 
Michael Pilch and Victor Wood. With a 
foreword by Lord Beveridge. London, Hut- 
chinson, 1960. Pp. 222. 

Covers both insured and non-insured pension 
schemes. Tells how to start a new pension 
scheme or how to alter an existing one. Dis- 
cusses industrial and British civil service pen- 
sion plans. 

Professional Workers 

30. Armsby, Henry Horton. Trends in 
Engineering Education, 1949 to 1959. Wash- 
ington, GPO, 1961. Pp. 67. 

An attempt to sum up the more important 
changes in engineering education over a ten- 
year period, and in some cases to look ahead 
for two years. This study is based on replies 
to a questionnaire supplied by 175 institutions. 

31. Conference on Scientific Man- 
power. 9th, New York, 1960. Scientific 
Manpower, 1960; Papers of the Ninth Con- 
ference on Scientific Manpower. Symposium 
on Sociology and Psychology of Scientists. 
Washington, GPO, 1961. Pp. 52. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



Two topics are considered: Developing 
Student Interest in Science and Engineering; 
Sociology and Psychology of Scientists. 

32. Engineering Institute of Canada. 
Engineering Careers in Canada. 1960-61 
Edition. Montreal, 1961. Pp. 90. 

Wages and Hours 

33. Alberta. Bureau of Statistics. 
Salary and Wage Rate Survey, Alberta. 
1 May 1961. Range of Wages, Weighted 
Averages and Medians by Size and Type of 
Firm, Alberta and Four Major Cities. Ed- 
monton, 1961. Pp. 104. 

34. British Columbia. Bureau of Eco- 
nomics and Statistics. Salary and Wage 
Rate Survey, July 1961. A Study of Salary 
and Wage Rates in Selected Clerical, Pro- 
fessional and Trade Occupations in Business 
and Industrial Establishments in Four 
Regions: Metropolitan Vancouver, Metro- 
politan Victoria, Southern Interior, Northern 
Centres. Victoria, 1961. Pp. 34. 

35. Segal, Martin. Wages in the Metrop- 
olis: Their Influence on the Location of 
Industries in the New York Region. Cam- 
bridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 
1960. Pp. 211. 

Contents: Wages and Skills as Locational 
Factors. Skill, Productivity, and Unionization. 
Wages and Fringe Benefits. Postwar Trends in 
Wages. Pressure from within the Region. The 
Wage Factor and the Region's Future. 

36. Stajner, R. Distribution of Income 
in Enterprises. Belgrade, Editorial Office of 
the Yugoslav Trade Unions, 1961. Pp. 54. 

Describes how income is distributed in 
Yugoslavia. 

37. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Salary Trends: City Public School Teachers, 
1925-59. Washington, GPO, 1961. Pp. 25. 

38. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Salary Trends: Federal Classified Em- 
ployees, 1939-60. Washington, GPO, 1961. 
Pp. 38. 

39. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Wage Structure: Cotton Textiles, August 
1960. Washington, GPO, 1961. Pp. 62. 

40. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Wage Structure: Synthetic Textiles, August 
1960. Washington, GPO, 1961. Pp. 50. 

Women 

41. National Council of Women of 
Canada. Year Book, 1961. Ottawa, 1961. 
Pp. 135. 

42. U.S. Women's Bureau. Careers for 
Women in the Biological Sciences. Washing- 
ton, GPO, 1961. Pp. 86. 

Partial Contents: Who are the Employers? 
Types of Work Activity. Nature of the Jobs. 
Preparation for a Career. Earnings and Other 
Work Factors. Finding Employment. 



43. U.S. Women's Bureau. Life Insur- 
ance Selling; Careers for Women as Life 
Underwriters. Washington, GPO, 1961. 
Pp. 35. 

Contents: The Life Insurance Industry. 
Women in Life Insurance. Some Facts about 
Life Underwriters. Requisites for Success in the 
Field. Income and Methods of Compensation. 
Hours of Work. Place of Employment and 
Working Arrangements. Outlook and How to 
get started. Training Opportunities and Ad- 
vancement. Life Underwriters Organizations. 

Miscellaneous 

44. Bureau of Railway Economics, 
Washington, D.C. Railroad Transportation, 
a Statistical Record, 1921-1959. Washington, 

1960. Pp. 39. 

45. Great Britain. Central Office of 
Information. Reference Division. Social 
Work in Britain. London, 1961. Pp. [98] 

Discusses social work as it applies to people 
at home, people at work, the sick and disabled, 
children and adolescents, the aged, delinquents, 
and recruitment and training of social workers. 

46. Great Britain. Ministry of Educa- 
tion. Handbook of Workshop Calculations. 
[Rev. ed.] London, HMSO, 1942 (Reprinted 
1960). Pp. 53. 

47. Grizzle, Stanley G. Discrimination; 
our Achilles Heel? Ottawa, Queen's Printer, 

1961. Pp. 7. 

Text of a broadcast given on the Federal 
Department of Labour's radio series, "Canada 
at Work." Mr. Grizzle is Secretary-Treasurer 
of the Toronto C.P.R. Division, Brotherhood of 
Sleeping Car Porters, and has worked actively 
for equal rights for people of all races and 
creeds. 

48. U.S. Interdepartmental Commit- 
tee on Children and Youth. Programs of 
the Federal Government affecting Children 
and Youth; a Summary. [Rev. ed.] Wash- 
ington, GPO, 1961. Pp. 95. 

The U.S. Interdepartmental Committee on 
Children and Youth includes representatives of 
Federal agencies conducting programs that 
affect the well-being of children. This book 
contains descriptions of the various depart- 
mental and agency programs. 

49. U.S. President's Committee on 
Employment of the Physically Handi- 
capped. Minutes, Annual Meeting, April 27 
and 28, 1961, Washington, D.C. Washing- 
ton, GPO, 1961. Pp. 126. 

50. Workshop on Aging, Toronto, 
1961. Community Councils and Committees 
on Aging. [Proceedings] Toronto, Ontario 
Society on Aging, 1961. 1 volume (various 
pagings). Workshop held March 25, 1961. 

The Workshop studied the role of the com- 
munity council or committee having to do 
with aging and "the role of the older person 
as planner and as effective participant in serv- 
ices and projects designed for his age group." 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



95 



Women's Bureau Issues Publication on Vocational Training for Girls 



In today's changing world, "new types of 
work that require special knowledge and 
skills are opening up," states the foreword 
to a new publication of the Women's 
Bureau, Department of Labour. 

"The world of work holds challenge and 
opportunity for girls who are ready to get 
the necessary education and training." 

The new publication, Vocational and 
Technical Training for Girls, lists and 
describes the various courses of vocational 
and technical training suitable for girls that 
are offered by Canadian educational insti- 
tutions at the high school, post high school 
and trade school levels of education. 



"The information brought together in 
this publication," the foreword says, "may 
help to open some new doors and encourage 
further searching for kinds of instruction 
that will meet individual needs and interests. 
At the same time in a broader context the 
publication may be a reminder that adequate 
vocational preparation is a prerequisite for 
all other action aimed at bettering the 
condition and status of women workers." 

Copies of the booklet may be obtained 
free from the Women's Bureau, Department 
of Labour, or from the Queen's Printer, 
Ottawa (Catalogue No. L38-1661). 



Labour Conditions in Government Contracts 

(Continued from page 90) 

Tower Co (1961) Ltd, construction of NDB Bldg & related work. Quebec Que: Alphonse 
Morency & Fils Ltee, revisions to heating system, Air Terminal Bldg, Airport. Ste-Ann-de- 
Bellevue Que: Presure Concrete Services Ltd, repair of lower guide pier, Ste Anne Canal. 
Balmoral Man: Surety Construction Co Ltd, construction of non-directional beacon bldg. 
Winnipeg Man: Tallman Construction Co Ltd, construction of storm drainage, Air Terminal 
Bldg, International Airport; Commonwealth Construction Co Ltd, construction of road, 
International Airport. Saskatoon Sash: Modern Building Cleaning Service of Canada Ltd, 
cleaning of Air Terminal Bldg, Airport. Cape St James B C: D Robinson Construction 
(1952) Ltd, construction of two double dwellings, power house, pumphouse, fresh water 
supply system, etc. 



ILO Governing Body 

{Continued from page //8) 
evidence in support of it. These particulars 
will be communicated to the Liberian 
Government as soon as received along with 
a request that it make its observations avail- 



able to the ILO by February 10 at the latest. 
The two Governments will be represented 
at the next session of the Governing Body, 
during which the Governing Body will 
decide whether the matter should be referred 
to a Commission of Inquiry. 



Report of Board 

(Continued from page 68) 

These proposals were put forward and 
both parties preferred that a formal report 
be submitted in order to comply with the 
Act and that they then deal directly with 
each other. 

We are, therefore, making no specific 
recommendations other than to suggest that 
this report be distributed to the parties 
forthwith and that they resume direct 
negotiations. 



Dated at Hamilton this 25th day of 
October, 1961. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

(Sgd.) H. C. Arrell, 

Chairman. 

(Sgd.) M. O'Brien, 

Member. 

(Sgd.) Paul Siren, 

Member. 



96 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



LABOUR STATISTICS 



Page 

Tables A-l and A-2— Labour Force 97 

Table B-l — Labour Income 98 

Tables C-l to G-6 — Employment, Hours and Earnings 99 

Tables D-l to D-4— Employment Service Statistics 104 

Tables E-l to E-4 — Unemployment Insurance 107 

Tables F-l and F-2— Prices 110 

Tables G-l to G-4— Strikes and Lockouts Ill 

Tables H-l and H-2— Industrial Fatalities 115 



A — Labour Force 

TABLE A-l— REGIONAL DISTRIBUTION, WEEK ENDED NOVEMBER 11, 1961 

(Estimates in thousands) 
Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 



The Labour Force 

Men 

Women 

14 — 19 years 

20— 24 years 

25—44 years. 

45—64 years 

65 years and over 

Employed 

Men 

Women 

Agricultural 

Non-Agricultural 

Paid Workers 

Men 

Women 

Unemployed 

Men 

Women 

Persons Not in the Labour Force 

Men 

Women 



Canada 


Atlantic 
Region 


Quebec 


Ontario 


Prairie 
Region 


6,504 
4,745 
1,759 


589 
444 
145 


1,810 

1,343 

467 


2,393 

1,697 

696 


1,131 
829 
302 


588 

810 

2,975 

1,912 

219 


65 
84 
246 
171 
23 


194 
267 
831 
472 
46 


185 

262 

1,121 

737 

88 


104 
136 
503 
344 
44 


6,155 


538 


1,698 


2,294 


1,082 


4,454 
1,701 


397 
141 


1,248 
450 


1,619 
675 


788 
294 


629 
5,526 


53 
485 


130 

1,568 


153 

2,141 


272 
810 


5,037 


436 


1,422 


1,979 


734 


3,504 
1,533 


311 
125 


1,009 
413 


1,359 
620 


485 
249 


349 


51 


112 


99 


49 


291 

58 


47 
4 


95 

17 


78 
21 


41 
8 


5,585 


631 


1,637 


1,843 


934 


1,273 
4,312 


165 
466 


359 
1,278 


393 
1,450 


219 

715 



British 
Columbia 



581 
432 
149 

40 

61 

274 

188 

18 

543 

402 
141 

21 
522 

466 

340 
126 

38 

30 



540 
137 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

52905-7—7 



• JANUARY 1962 



TABLE A-2— UNEMPLOYED 

(Estimates in thousands) 
Source: DBS Labour Force Survey 



November 
1961 



October 
1961 



November 



Total unemployed 

On temporary layoff up to 30 days 
Without work and seeking work. . . 

Seeking full-time work 

Seeking part-time work 

Seeking under 1 month 

Seeking 1 — 3 months 

Seeking 4 — 6 months 

Seeking more than 6 months. . 



349 



18 
331 



307 

24 



106 
122 



58 



318 



13 

305 



25 

95 

102 
47 
61 



429 

28 
401 

380 
21 

127 
158 
62 
54 



B — Labour Income 

TABLE B-l— ESTIMATES OF LABOUR INCOME 

Note: All figures in this table except those for 1956 have been revised. Monthly and quarterly figures may not add 
to annual totals because of rounding. 

(5 Millions) 

Source: Dominion Bureau of Statistics 





Monthly Total 


Quarterly Totals*') 






Year and 
Month 


Mining 


Manu- 
facturing 


Trans- 
portation, 
Storage 
and 
Communi- 
cation ( 2 ) 


Forestry 


Construc- 
tion 


Public 
utilities 


Trade 


Finance 
Services 
(including 
Govern- 
ment) 


Supple- 
men- 
tary 
Labour 
income 


Totals 

(3) 


1956— Total. . . . 
1957— Total.... 
1958— Total.... 
1959— Total.... 
1960— Total. . . . 

1960— 


498 
535 
527 
552 
551 

45.7 
45.4 
44.3 

44.2 
44.4 
44.5 
43.2 
45.7 
46.2 
46.2 
46.3 
46.3 
46.3 


4,586 
4,838 
4,828 
5,103 
5,200 

437.5 
432.3 
422.6 

420.0 
424.4 
427.1 
431.5 
443.1 
458.1 
451.7 
460.0 
465.2 
463.6 


1,560 
1,661 
1,677 
1,773 
1,779 

151.2 
148.5 
144.7 

140. 5 
142.0 
142.5 
145.4 
151.1 
162.9 
164.6 
160.2 
160.0 
157.3 


371 
336 
270 
288 
326 


1,210 
1,311 
1,329 
1,472 
1,472 


239 
277 
298 
316 
327 


2,069 
2,265 
2,359 
2,528 
2,641 


3,546 
3,920 
4,295 
4,705 
5,095 


617 
683 
739 
819 
916 


14,890 
16,018 
16,524 
17,761 
18,514 

1,599.8 


November. . . 


91.6 


369.9 


82.6 


685.4 


1,319.2 


235.5 


1,573.7 
1,529.4 


1961— 

January 

February 














1,494.3 


62.1 


278.7 


81.8 


656.5 


1,327.4 


235.7 


1,502.3 
1,510.1 
















1,536.2 


May 


62.4 


356.0 


84.6 


679.2 


1,382.0 


242.3 


1,592.7 




1,659.2 


July 














1,651.5 


August 

September*.. 
October! 


75.4* 


439.1* 


87.6* 


691.0* 


1,393.7* 


248.2* 


1,667.7 
1,693.0 














1,680.7 

















U> Quarterly figures are entered opposite the middle month of the quarter but represent quarterly totals. 
( 2 ) Includes post office wages and salaries. 

( J > Figures in this column are for total labour income, Canada, but are not totals of the figures in the remaining 
columns of this table, as figures for labour income in Agriculture, Fishing and Trapping are not shown. 
* Revised, 
t Preliminary. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



C — Employment, Hours and Earnings 

Tables C-l to C-3 are based on reports from employers having 15 or more employces-at 
October 1961 employers in the principal non-agricultural industries reported a total employ- 
ment of 2,920,984. Tables C-4 and C-5 are based on reports from a somewhat smaller number of 
firms than Tables C-l to C-3. They relate only to wage earners for whom statistics of hours 
of work are also available whereas Tables C-l to C-3 relate to salaried employees as well as to all 
wage earners in the reporting firms. 

TABLE C-l— EMPLOYMENT, PAYROLLS AND WEEKLY WAGES AND SALARIES 

(1949-100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 
Source: Employment and Payrolls, D.B.S. 





Industrial Composite 


Manufacturing 


Year and Month 


Index Numbers 
(1949-100)0) 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 


Index Numbers 
(1949-100) 


Average 


Employ- 
ment 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 

and 
Salaries 


Employ- 
K ment 


Average 

Weekly 

wages 

and 

Salaries 


Weekly 

Wages 

and 

Salaries 


Averages 

1955 


112.9 
120.7 
122.6 
117.9 
119.7 

121.5 
119.7 
114.8 

111.0 
111.0 

111.1 
112.6 
117.2 
121.3 
122.5 
123.9 
123.3 
122.8 


142.1 
150.0 
158.1 
163.9 
171.0 

178.3 
177.9 
175.0 

179.2 
181.1 
180.7 
181.8 
181.6 
182.8 
182.1 
182.2 
183.3 
184.0 


$ 

61.05 
64.44 
67.93 
70.43 
73.47 

76.60 
76.43 
75.18 

77.00 

77.80 
77.64 
78.12 
78.00 
78.55 
78.24 
78.27 
78.75 
79.06 


109.8 
115.8 
115.8 
109.8 
111.1 

109.6 
108.1 
104.1 

104.3 
104.6 
104.9 
105.4 
108.4 
111.2 
110.9 
113.1 
112.8 
112.1 


144.4 
151.7 
159.1 
165.3 
172.5 

179.6 
180.0 
177.2 

181.1 

182.5 
182.8 
184.1 
183.6 
184.6 
1S2.7 
182.9 
184.6 
186.0 


$ 
63.48 


1956 


66.71 


1957 


69.94 


1958 


72.67 


1959 


75.84 


1960 


78.95 




79.16 




77.92 


19C1 


79.65 




80.24 


March 


80.36 




80.95 




80.72 




81.17 


July 


80.34 




80.42 




81.15 




81.77 







(''Includes (1) Forestry (chiefly logging), (2) Mining (including milling), quarrying and oil wells, (3) Manufacturing, 
(4) Construction, (5) Transportation, storage and communication, (6) Public utility operation, (7) Trade, (8) Finance, 
insurance and real estate and (9) Service, (mainly hotels, restaurants, laundries, dry cleaning plants, business and 
recreational service). 

♦Revised. 

tPreliminary. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



99 



TABLE C-2— AREA SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT AND AVERAGE WEEKLY WAGES 

AND SALARIES 

(1949 = 100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 
Source: Employment and Payrolls D.B.S. 



Area 


Employment Index 
Numbers 


Average Weekly Wages 
and Salaries, in Dollars 


Sept. 
1961 


Aug. 
1961 


Sept. 
1960 


Sept. 
1961 


Aug. 
1961 


Sept. 
1960 


Provinces 


147.1 
147.5 
98.2 
111.1 
124.0 
122.2 
115.2 
131.9 
163.3 
117.8 

123.2 

150.8 

80.9 
124.6 
108.7 
110.1 
113.3 
120.0 
111.7 
107.5 
115.6 

83.3 
126.2 
133.6 
119.0 

90.8 
119.3 
134.6 
110.2 
112.5 
113.8 

80.7 
124.2 
106.6 
125.2 
147.7 

90.8 
134.0 
131.8 

74.2 
146.7 
112.3 
113.6 
141.9 
145.6 
198.9 
176.9 
114.1 
113.3 


142.8 
149.7 
99.1 
112.5 
124.7 
122.7 
116.2 
132.8 
166.0 
118.9 

123.9 

145.2 

76.1 
123.6 
109.3 
108.9 
116.0 
120.1 
109.7 
109.5 
116.6 

80.4 
125.8 
135.5 
122.2 

90.5 
158.3 
134.9 
110.3 
109.8 
108.7 

82.5 
125.2 
108.9 
124.1 
150.1 

93.4 
132.6 
134.9 

73.4 
148.8 
116.9 
114.2 
143.1 
145.2 
201.1 
178.2 
116.6 
113.3 


151.4 

144.8 
97.9 
108.1 
124.2 
121.8 
115.9 
134.0 
159.8 
118.9 

123.1 

143.8 

96.0 
117.9 
101.9 
107.0 
120.7 
112.6 
104.6 
109.9 
113.2 

78.4 
125.5 
127.0 
112.9 

93.6 
165.4 
131.4 
111.4 
111.6 
113.3 

79.3 
122.7 
119.7 
124.5 
147.8 

94.3 
126.4 
126.9 

76.4 
145.1 
115.4 
115.0 
135.6 
147.1 
192.1 
176.9 
115.0 
113.0 


$ 

69.91 
56.56 
64.29 
63.00 
75.85 
81.46 
74.46 
75.14 
82.67 
86.02 

78.73 

57.17 
74.58 
65.72 
61.36 
63.28 
96.15 
68.05 
66.31 
83.66 
74.76 
62.31 
77.95 
73.76 
77.39 
87.29 
87.05 
82.49 
88.02 
87.70 
78.08 
72.73 
74.08 
71.22 
75.00 
92.60 
71.87 
76.61 
101.89 
88.57 
99.07 
81.16 
71.22 
73.14 
70.09 
76.57 
77.46 
84.22 
75.94 


$ 

71.11 
55.79 
64.13 
62.35 
75.15 
81.82 
73.99 
74.50 
81.66 
84.08 

78.27 

58.11 
75.79 
66.23 
60.74 
62.77 
95.96 
67.35 
65.17 
86.44 
73.49 
63.22 
77.23 
73.28 
77.89 
85.41 
92.85 
82.51 
87.57 
89.49 
77.17 
73.35 
74.33 
70.77 
74.77 
92.41 
71.38 
75.77 

101.81 
86.95 

104.91 
81.86 
70.92 
71.80 
69.12 
76.20 
77.35 
83.25 
76.52 


% 

69.41 




53.73 




63.33 




62.67 




73.71 




79.58 




72.76 




73.42 




78.18 




83.63 




76.55 


Urban Areas 


55.12 




76.71 




62.28 




60.41 




63.72 




95.62 




65.20 




64.04 




83.12 




72.69 




61.42 




75.32 


Ottawa — Hull 


71.93 




74.92 




85.27 




90.14 




80.08 




85.06 




85.91 
76.38 




71.68 




71.35 


Gait 


69.22 




72.01 




89.52 




68.93 




73.54 




99.61 




84.42 




95.49 




80.45 




69.31 




71.23 




68.76 




73.94 




74.34 




81.53 




74.45 







100 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



TABLE C-3— INDUSTRY SUMMARY OF EMPLOYMENT AND AVERAGE WEEKLY 

WAGES AND SALARIES 

(1949 = 100) (The latest figures are subject to revision) 

Source: Employment and Payrolls D.B.S. 



Industry 



Employment Index 
Numbers 



Sept. 
1961 



Aug. 
1961 



Sept. 
1960 



Average Weekly Wages 
and Salaries, in Dollars 



Sept. 
1961 



Aug. 
1961 



Sept. 



Mining 

Metal mining 

Gold 

Other metal 

Fuels 

Coal 

Oil and natural gas 

Non-metal 

Manufacturing 

Durable goods 

Non-durable goods 

Food and beverages 

Meat products 

Canned and preserved fruits and vegetables 

Grain mill products 

Bread and other bakery products 

Distilled and malt liquors 

Tobacco and tobacco products 

Rubber products 

Leather products 

Boots and shoes (except rubber) 

Textile products (except clothing) 

Cotton yarn and broad woven goods 

Woollen goods 

Synthetic textiles and silk 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Men's clothing 

Women's clothing 

Knit goods 

Wood products 

Saw and planing mills 

Furniture 

Other wood products 

Paper products 

Pulp and paper mills 

Other paper products 

Printing, publishing and allied industries 

Iron and steel products 

Agricultural implements 

Fabricated and structural steel 

Hardware and tools 

Heating and cooking appliances 

Iron castings 

Machinery industrial 

Primary iron and steel 

Sheet metal products 

Wire and wire products 

Transportation equipment 

Aircraft and parts 

Motor vehicles 

Motor vehicles parts and accessories 

Railroad and rolling stock equipment 

Shipbuilding and repairing 

Non-ferrous metal products 

Aluminum products 

Brass and copper products 

Smelting and refining 

Electrical apparatus and supplies 

Heavy electrical machinery 

Telecommunication equipment 

Non-metallic mineral products 

Clay products 

Glass and glass products 

Products of petroleum and coal 

Petroleum refining and products 

Chemical products 

Medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. 

Acids, alkalis and salts 

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 

Construction 

Building and general engineering 

Highways, bridges and streets 

Electric and motor transportation 

Service 

Hotels and restaurants 

Laundries and dry cleaning plants 

Industrial composite 



118.4 

132.7 
70.0 

191.3 
85.4 
42.9 

268.4 

149.6 

113.7 

112.5 
112.9 
129.4 
139.9 
198.7 
104.5 
112.4 
100.5 
80.9 
102.6 
88.9 
94.7 
80.1 
74.8 
62.4 
85.1 
93.8 
94.5 
104.5 
73.8 
108.5 
111.8 
113.6 
82.7 
127.4 
128.2 
125.5 
125.3 
104.5 
47.1 
152.9 
102.2 
103.0 
95.4 
117.8 
121.4 
106.9 
111.8 
100.5 
254.1 
79.7 
102.0 
56.6 
131.7 
127.1 
145.2 
106.0 
143.5 
138.7 
102.4 
241.8 
147.6 
93.3 
159.7 
136.8 
139.7 
132.6 
120.6 
155.9 
144.7 

140.1 

133.2 
151.6 
140.2 

155. 
135. 



120.2 

136.0 
72.4 

195.3 
82.4 
39.2 

268.0 

159.5 

113.1 

113.7 
112.6 
129.6 
140.8 
177.9 
104.2 
113.6 
103.4 
80.2 
99.9 
89.6 
96.3 
79.3 
73.1 
62.9 
85.1 
92.6 
93.0 
103.5 
72.8 
111.5 
116.9 
113.6 



81.4 
128.5 
130.2 
124.4 
123.9 
105.6 

62.3 
153.2 
101.0 
101.8 

92.3 
116.5 
120.4 
110.1 
111.9 
104.2 
255.9 

92.0 
103.5 

58.3 
129.5 
124.5 
144.9 
104.8 
140.4 
135.1 



3 
5 
126.1 



123.2 



100. 
235. 
148. 
93. 
158. 
138. 
141. 
132. 
119. 
158. 
142. 

145.5 

137.8 
158.4 
139.7 

162.3 
141.3 
125.2 

12?. 9 



123.2 

138.0 
73.4 

198.1 
91.9 
50.9 

268.3 

147.8 

111.6 

111.6 

111.7 

129.9 

139.4 

207.9 

105.0 

113.4 

105.3 

78.8 

102.7 

85.8 

93.5 

77.4 

67.7 

64.0 

83.9 

92.5 

92.2 

100.7 

75.7 

106.0 

107.3 

114.0 

84.6 

127.5 

128.9 

124.1 

124.5 

102.7 

53.5 

136.3 

98.5 

96.8 

89.9 

113.6 

117.3 

111.8 

115.8 

103.4 

244.7 

98.2 

100.6 

60.3 

119.8 

130.4 

146.7 

102.3 

153.5 

133.0 

103.9 

217.2 

144.3 

89.7 

151.7 

140 

143.1 

133.4 

116.6 

160.7 

132.8 

114.3 

139.5 
152.2 
135.1 

147.6 
135.0 
115.7 

123.1 



$ 
95.97 

98.02 
80.18 

104.11 
97.10 
72.62 

113.89 
85.87 

81.14 

88.20 
75.24 
68.88 
81.17 
54.21 
81.20 
68.13 
98.08 
81.73 
86.01 
55.92 
53.13 
65.54 
63.22 
61.75 
71.22 
51.84 
50.83 
53.15 
51.07 
71.49 
73.36 
70.26 
62.47 
95.46 

102.90 
77.65 
88.74 
93.26 
95.89 
94.25 
82.77 
81.12 
90.59 
88.52 

106.13 
91.83 
95.58 
92.66 
96.09 

107.04 
89.00 
84.70 
84.83 
93.66 
90.37 
90.96 

101.33 
89.32 
96.22 
86.32 
86.49 
78.16 
82.96 

115.63 

116.19 
96.16 
83.98 

107.03 
71.85 

84.81 
92.42 
73.60 
83.10 

55.25 
42.26 
48.72 

78.73 



$ 
95.00 

97.36 
79.28 

103.61 
97.21 
72.86 

112.50 
82.61 

80.42 

87.18 
74.70 
68.07 
80.65 
49.71 
79.28 
67.88 
99.05 
84.16 
85.22 
55.83 
53.38 
64.88 
62.68 
61.08 
70.56 
51.62 
49.79 
53.92 
50.88 
69.46 
70.39 
70.04 
61.38 
94.96 

101.95 
77.80 
87.68 
93.08 
90.89 
92.01 
81.66 
80.64 
89.90 
88.08 

109.50 
91.14 
93.62 
90.96 
92.86 

102.80 
89.99 
84.02 
82.60 
93.90 
90.63 
90.74 

101.92 
87.99 
94.59 
86.14 
86.01 
77.36 
82.01 

116.21 

116.93 
95.02 
83.51 

105.50 
71.01 

84.57 

92.35 
73.23 
83.89 

54.84 
41.53 

48.18 

78.27 



% 
93.62 

95.85 
76.53 

102.52 
93.48 
73.95 

109.43 
84.45 

78.37 
85.09 
72.75 
66.57 
78.12 
52.17 
77.45 
66.01 
93.28 
82.25 
80.83 
52.90 
50.41 
63.02 
59.30 
59.32 
69.56 
49.00 
47.31 
49.91 
49.63 
60.07 
71.01 
67.27 
62.09 
93.30 

100. 83 
74.89 
85.75 
89.68 
89.04 
89.99 
80.05 
77.98 
84.42 
86.66 

102.66 
91.31 
87.55 
89.77 
94.73 

100.73 
86.62 
79.89 
82.34 
90.65 
87.23 
85.56 
98.15 
85.34 
93.59 
84.01 
82.65 
74.55 
79.15 

116.24 

117.09 
91.46 
81.03 

102.10 
69.87 

84.27 
92.06 
72.53 
81.20 

53.29 
41.53 
47.26 

76.55 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

52905-7—8 



JANUARY 7962 



101 



Tables C-4 and C-5 are based on reports from a somewhat smaller number of firms than 
Tables C-l to C-3. They relate only to wage-earners for whom statistics of hours of work are 
also available whereas Tables C-l to C-3 relate to salaried employees as well as to all wage-earners 
of the co-operative firms. 

TABLE C-4— HOURS AND EARNINGS IN MANUFACTURING BY PROVINCES 

(Hourly-Rated Wage-Earners) Source: Man-hours and Hourly Earnings (Dominion Bureau of Statistics) 
(The latest figures are subject to revision) 



Newfoundland 

Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

AlbertaO) 

British Columbia( 2 ) 



Average Hours Worked 



September 
1961 


August 
1961 


38.0 


40.2 


40.1 


40.8 


40.6 


40.0 


42.4 


42.0 


41.4 


41.0 


40.1 


40.1 


39.2 


38.2 


39.8 


40.1 


38.0 


36.9 



September 



39.0 
40.8 
41.7 
41.8 
40.9 
40.2 
38.9 
39.0 
37.7 



Average Hourly Earnings 
(in cents) 



September 
1961 



1.66 
1.58 
1.57 
1.65 
1.90 
1.73 
1.94 
1.98 
2.22 



August 
1961 



1.66 
1.54 
1.50 
1.64 
1.92 
1.72 
1.94 
1.95 
2.18 



September 
1960 



1.61 
1.55 
1.52 
1.61 
1.86 
1.65 
1.88 
1.87 
2.17 



f 1 ) Includes Northwest Territories. 
( 2 ) Includes Yukon Territory. 

Note:— Information on hours and earnings by cities is obtainable from Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings (Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics). 



TABLE C-6— EARNINGS AND HOURS OF HOURLY-RATED 
WAGE EARNERS IN MANUFACTURING 

Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, D.B.S. 



Period 


Hours 
Worked 
Per week 


Average 
Hourly 
Earnings 


Average 
Weekly 
Wages 


Index Number of 
Average U'eekly 
\Miges (1949-10u) 




Current 
Dollars 


1949 
Dollars 




No. 

41.0 
41.0 
40.4 
40.2 
■ 40.7 

40.6 
40.6 
38.7 

40.1 
40.4 
40.3 
40.6 
40.5 
41.0 
40.6 
40.9 
41.3 
41.2 


$ 

1.45 

1.52 
1.61 
1.66 
1.72 

1.78 
1.79 
1.82 

1.81 
1.82 
1.83 
1.84 
1.84 
1.83 
1.82 
1.82 
1.81 
1.84 


$ 

59 45 
62. 4 J 
64 96 
66.77 
70.16 

72.66 
72.82 
70.60 

72.76 
72.40 
73.64 
74.56 
74.44 
75. 12 
73.95 
74.26 
75.00 
75.67 


No. 

142.4 
149 5 
155.6 
160.0 
168.1 

174.1 
174.5 
169.1 

174.3 
175.9 
176.4 
178.6 
178.3 
179.7 
177.2 
177.9 
179.7 
181.3 


122.4 




126.3 




127 4 




127.7 




132.8 


Last Pay Period in: 

1960 October 


134 3 




134.6 




13U.9 




135.2 




136.2 




136.7 




138.5 


May 


138.3 




139.3 


July 


137.3 




137.8 




139.1 




139.8 







Note: The index of average weekly wages in 1949 dollars is computed by dividing the index of average weekly 
wages in current dollars by the Consumer Price Index. For a more complete statement of uses and limitations of the 
adjusted figures see Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, D.B.S. page ii. 

* Revised. 

t Latest figures subject to revision. 



102 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



TABLE C-5— HOURS AND EARNINGS BY INDUSTRY 

(Hourly-Rated Wage-Earners) 

Source: Man-Hours and Hourly Earnings, D.B.S. 

(The latest figures are subject to revision) 



Industry 



Milling 

Metal mining 

Gold 

Other metal 

Fuels 

Coal 

Oil and natural gas 

Non-metal 

Manufacturing 

Durable goods 

Non-durable goods 

Food and beverages 

Meat products 

Canned and preserved fruits and vegetables 

Grain mill products 

Bread and other bakery products 

Distilled liquors 

Malt liquors 

Tobacco and tobacco products 

Rubber products 

Leather products 

Boots and shoes (except rubber) 

Other leather products 

Textile products (except clothing) 

Cotton yarn and broad woven goods 

Woollen goods 

Synthetic textiles and silk 

Clothing (textile and fur) 

Men's clothing 

Women's clothing 

Knit goods 

*Wood products 

Saw and planing mills 

Furniture 

Other wood products 

Paper products 

Pulp and paper mills 

Other paper products 

Printing, publishing and allied industries 

*Iron and steel products 

Agricultural implements . 

Fabricated and structural steel 

Hardware and tools 

Heating and cooking appliances 

Iron castings 

Machinery, industrial 

Primary iron and steel 

Sheet metal products 

Wire and wire products 

•Transportation equipment. 

Aircraft and parts '.'.' 

Motor vehicles 

Motor vehicle parts and accessories 

Railroad and rolling stock equipment 

Shipbuilding and repairing 

•Non-ferrous metal products 

Aluminum products 

Brass and copper products 

Smelting and refining 

•Electrical apparatus and supplies 

Heavy electrical machinery and equipment. 

Telecommunication equipment 

Refrigerators, vacuum cleaners and 

appliances 

Wire and cable 

Miscellaneous electrical products 

•Non-metallic mineral products 

Clay products 

Glass and glass products 

Products of petroleum and coal 

Chemical products 

Medicinal and pharmaceutical preparations. . 

Acids, alkalis and salts 

Miscellaneous manufacturing industries 

Construction 

Building and general engineering '. 

Highways, bridges and streets 

Electric and motor transportation 

Service 

Hotels and restaurants 

Laundries and dry cleaning plants 



Average Weekly 
Hours 



Sept. Aug. Sept. 
1961 1961 1960 



41.9 

42.1 
42.6 
41.9 
39.5 
38.9 
40.6 
44.0 
41.3 
41.6 
41.0 
40.7 
40.9 
43.9 
42.8 
41.2 
40.9 
39.0 
39.8 
42.8 
41.7 
41.4 
42.1 
42.9 
42.0 
43.6 
44.0 
39.5 
39.3 
38.1 
41.9 
42.3 
41.5 
44.2 
42.6 
41.5 
41.5 
41.7 
39.5 
41.5 
39.2 
41.0 
42.6 
42.3 
42.7 
41.7 
40.1 
42.3 
42.5 
40.7 
41.7 
42.0 
39.7 
39.7 
40.3 
41.0 
42.7 
42.6 
39.8 
42.0 
41.8 
41.7 

40.9 
43.3 
42.3 
43.6 
43.1 
41.4 
40.4 
41.2 
40.3 
40.6 
42.1 
42.5 
42.1 
43.2 
43.6 
38.6 
38.4 
40.1 



no. 
42.1 

42.2 
42.6 
42.1 
40.9 
41.1 
40.6 
43.1 
40.9 
41.2 
40.6 
39.7 
40.6 
37.1 
42.6 
41.7 
40.2 
40.9 
40.7 
42.4 
41.7 
41.8 
41.5 
42.6 
41.6 
43.3 
43.4 
39.3 
38.5 
38.4 
41.9 
41.5 
40.4 
44.2 
41.9 
41.5 
41.3 
41.9 
39.2 
41.3 
37.7 
40.4 
41.9 
41.7 
42.4 
41.4 
41.4 
41.7 
41.8 
40.1 
40.8 
40.4 
40.3 
39.5 
39.5 
41.0 
43.2 
42.3 
40.8 
41.1 



40.0 
44.4 
40.9 
43.5 
42.8 
40.6 
41.1 
40.6 
39.8 
40.0 
41.3 
42.6 
42.1 
43.4 
44.3 
38.9 
.39.2 



no. 
42.1 

42.3 

43.0 

42.0 

40.7 

41.4 

39.5 

43.5 

40.9 

41.1 

40.6 

41.0 

40.6 

43.2 

42.7 

41.9 

40.4 

39. C 

41.9 

41.5 

40.3 

40.1 

40.8 

42.1 

40.3 

43.6 

43.5 

38.2 

37.4 

36.6 

41.4 

41.8 

40.7 

43.4 

43.5 

41.8 

42.0 

41.5 

39.3 

40.8 

38.8 

41.4 

41.6 

40.9 

40.6 

41.6 

39. 

42. 



40. 

42. 

41. 

40.1 

39.5 

40.3 

40.8 

43.4 

40.0 

40.3 

40.7 

41.0 

40.6 



39.8 
40.9 
42.9 
42.0 
40.9 
40.8 
40.6 
39.5 
40.4 
41.9 
43.1 
42.7 
43.7 
43.6 
39.0 
39.2 
39.7 



Average Hourly 
Earnings 



Sept. Aug. Sept. 
1961 1961 



$ 
2.13 

2.21 
1.75 
2.38 
2.01 
1.78 
2.37 
1.94 
1.82 
1.99 
1.66 
1.53 
1.88 
1.14 
1.81 
1.49 
2.07 
2.34 
1.91 
1.89 
1.24 
1.19 
1.35 
1.38 
1.41 
1.30 
1.45 
1.19 
1.19 
1.27 
1.11 
1.62 
1.72 
1.49 
1.35 
2.17 
2.34 
1.71 
2.25 
2.14 
2.14 
2.10 
1.79 
1.81 
2.04 
2.00 
2.54 
2.08 
2.13 
2.12 
2.11 
2.35 
2.08 
2.08 
2.07 
2.14 
1.88 
2.03 
2.39 
1.89 
2.09 
1.73 

1.91 
2.12 
1.82 
1.87 
1.70 
1.88 
2.56 
2.04 
1.56 
2.37 
1.49 
1.96 
2.15 
1,65 
1.90 
1 07 
1.04 
1.04 



$ 
2.10 

2.19 
1.72 
2.36 
1.97 
1.75 
2.33 
1.91 
1.82 
1.98 
1.67 
1.55 
1.88 
1.20 
1.77 
1.49 
2.05 
2.33 
1.95 
1.87 
1.24 
1.18 
1.35 
1.38 
1.41 
1.29 
1.45 
1.19 
1.18 
1.28 
1.10 
1.60 
1.69 
1.49 
1.34 
2.16 
2.33 
1.71 
2.22 
2.15 
2.16 
2.10 
1.79 
1.81 
2.04 
1.98 
2.55 
2.09 
2.11 
2.12 
2.08 
2.35 
2.09 
2.08 
2.04 
2.14 
1.89 
2.03 
2.38 
1.88 
2.07 
1.73 

1.89 
2.12 
1.79 
1.87 
1.68 
1.91 
2.56 
2.04 
1.56 
2.36 
1.50 
1.96 
2.15 
1.64 
1.90 
1.04 
1.01 
1.03 



$ 
2.07 

2.16 
1.65 
2.36 
1.94 
1.76 
2.31 
1.87 
1.77 
1.94 
1.62 
1.50 
1.81 
1.14 
1.73 
1.45 
1.99 
2.23 
1.85 
1.82 
1.20 
1.16 
1.31 
1.34 
1.36 
1.25 
1.43 
1.15 
1.15 
1.21 
1.08 
1.58 
1.69 
1.45 
1.32 
2.10 
2.26 
1.65 
2.18 
2.09 
2.01 
2.01 
1.78 
1.78 
1.96 
1.95 
2.49 
2.07 
2.02 
2.06 
2.07 
2.26 
2.01 
1.96 
2.00 
2.08 
1.82 
1.98 
2.30 
1.85 
2.06 
1.68 

1.88 
2.06 
1.73 
1.81 
1.63 
1.83 
2.55 
1.99 
1.53 
2.28 
1.45 
1.94 
2.12 
1.63 
1.85 
1.05 
1.02 
1.01 



Average Weekly 
Wages 



Sept. Aug. Sept. 
1961 1961 1960 



$ 
89.30 

93.08 
74.62 
99.79 
79.59 
69.22 
96.09 
85.10 
74.97 
82.75 
68.23 
62.48 
76.80 
50.18 
77.43 
61.58 
84.70 
91.29 
76.19 
81.03 
51.67 
49.15 
57.08 
59.39 
59.44 
56.64 
63.87 
47.17 
46.70 
48.39 
46.28 
68.49 
71.38 
65.82 
57.33 
90.11 
97.05 
71.50 
89.00 
88.80 
83.69 
86.24 
76.36 
76.43 
86.97 
83.30 
102.15 
87.95 
90.34 
86.46 
88.01 
98.53 
82.61 
82.62 
83.35 
87.68 
80.23 
86.24 
95.20 
79.56 
87.31 
72.11 

77.92 
91.70 
76.87 
81.75 
73.28 
77.60 
103.32 
84.28 
63.09 
96.36 
62.63 
83.40 
90.44 
71.44 
82.69 
41.28 
39.78 
41.70 



I 

88.66 

92.34 
73.04 
99.55 
80.76 
71.90 
94.61 
82.31 
74.26 
81.76 
67.65 
61.70 
76.35 
44.45 
75.47 
62.21 
82.45 
95.23 
79.37 
79.36 
51.58 
49.49 
56.20 
58.58 
58.76 
56.02 
63.05 
46.75 
45.30 
49.14 
46.13 
66.38 
68.10 
65.89 
56.21 
89.70 
96.32 
71.53 
87.25 
88.72 
81.38 
84.62 
74.97 
75.61 
86.45 
81.94 
105. 65 
87.12 
88.31 
85.17 
84.84 
95.00 
84.19 
81.95 
80.81 
87.64 
81.49 
85.99 
95.40 
77.35 
84.84 
70.28 

75.65 
94.05 
73. 13 
81.48 
71.91 
77.72 
105.27 
82.92 
62.11 
94.62 
61.89 
83.46 
90.55 
71.20 
84.20 
40.67 
39.38 
40.82 



$ 
87.35 

91.32 
71.15 
98.95 
79.19 
72.84 
91.45 
81.29 
72.37 
79.63 
66.05 
61.35 
73.70 
49.01 
73.98 
60.93 
80.54 
86.81 
77.37 
75.27 
48.51 
46.38 
53.48 
56.6a 
54.77 
54. 3* 
62.10. 
43.86- 
43.08 
44.25 
44.91 
65.99< 
68.82- 
63.02* 
57.30* 
87.93: 
94.99- 
68.65 
85.56 
85.18 
78.24 
83.15 
73.95 
72.68 
79.87 
81.02 
98.91 
87.50 
81.70 
83.78 
87.01 
93.26 
80.59 
77.35 
80.72 
85.01 
78.82 
79. ; 42 
92.52 
75.02 
84.71 
68.23 

74.93 
82.04 
70.89 
77.81 
68.62 
74.70 
103.89 
80.96 
60.58 
92.08 
60.73 
83.56 
90.69 
71.17 
80.60- 
40.91 
39.90' 
40.29 



'Durable manufactured goods industries. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

52905-7— 8i 



• JANUARY 7962 



T03 



D — National Employment Service Statistics 

Statistics presented in the following tables relate to registrations for employment and 
vacancies notified by employers at NES offices. These data are derived from reports 
prepared in National Employment Service offices and processed in the Unemployment 
Insurance Section, D.B.S. 

TABLE D-l— UNFILLED VACANCIES AND REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Period 



Unfilled Vacancies* 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Registrations for Employment 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Date Nearest: 

January 1, 1956... 

January 1, 1957... 

January 1, 1958... 

January 1, 1959... 

January 1, 1960... 

January 1,1961... 

February 1,1961... 

March 1,1961... 

April 1,1961... 

May 1,1961... 

June 1,1961... 

July 1,1961... 

August 1,1961... 

Seprember 1, 1961... 

October 1,1961... 

November 1, 1961... 

December 1, 1961< l > 

January 1, 19620 



17,986 
19,784 
7,450 
8,643 
9,097 

9,859 

8,866 
8,786 
9,927 
14,098 
17,078 
15,103 
15,880 
14,963 
14,645 
12,936 
17,462 

11.402 



12,111 
13,440 
7,270 
8,549 
9,779 



8,377 
9,513 
11,387 
13,802 
17,208 
16,445 
14,732 
17,850 
17,066 
14,979 
15,940 

10,866 



30,097 
33,224 
14,720 
17,192 
18,876 

17,855 

17,243 
18,299 
21,314 
27,900 
34,286 
31,548 
30,612 
32,813 
31,711 
27,915 
33,402 

22,268 



312,066 
343,956 
596,104 
562.257 
522,206 

570,789 

668,766 
691,351 
683,034 
594,904 
418,218 
268,284 
246,016 
216,245 
216,358 
249,228 
329,331 

478,734 



S4.815 
92,207 
147,349 
158,163 
157,962 

163,893 

185,972 
186,991 
180,982 
172,884 
151,611 
125,447 
117,993 
104,695 
101,260 
107,697 
125,001 

136,654 



396,881 
436,163 
743,453 
720,420 
680,168 

734,682 

854,738 
878,342 
864,016 
767,788 
569,829 
393,731 
364,009 
320,940 
317,618 
356,925 
454,332 

615,388 



( l > Latest figures subject to revision. 

* Current Vacancies only. Deferred Vacancies are excluded. 



TABLE D-2— UNFILLED VACANCIES BY INDUSTRY AND BY SEX AS AT 
NOVEMBER 30, 1961 (') 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Industry 



Agriculture, Fishing, Trapping 

Forestry 

Mining, Quarrying and Oil Wells 

Manufacturing 

Construction 

Transportation, Storage and Communication 

Public Utility Operation 

Trade 

Finance, Insurance and Real Estate 

Service 

GRAND TOTAL, 



Male 



278 
564 
310 

2,738 

1,061 

529 

82 

2,010 
695 

9,409 



17,676 



Female 



37 

1,723 

52 

195 

17 

2,581 

483 

10,866 



16,028 



Total 



343 

573 

347 

4,461 

1,113 

724 

99 

4,591 

1,178 

20,275 



33,704 



Change 
from 



November 



+ 99 
28 
10 
+ 1,364 
+ 275 
+ 185 
+ 30 
+ 1,376 
+ 411 
+ 2,847 
+ 6,549 



<!> Preliminary— subject to revision. 

Current vacancies only. Deferred vacancies are excluded. 



104 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



TABLE D-3— UNFILLED VACANCEES AND REGISTRATIONS FOR EMPLOYMENT 
BY OCCUPATION AND BY SEX AS AT NOVEMBER 30, 1961 (0 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Occupational Group 



Professional and Managerial Workers. 
Clerical Workers 



Sales Workers 

Personal and Domestic Service Workers. 



Seaman. 



Agriculture, Fishing, Forestry (Ex. log.) 



Skilled and Semi-Skilled Workers 

Food and kindred products (incl 

tobacco) 

Textiles, clothing, etc 

Lumber and lumber products 

Pulp, paper (incl. printing) 

Leather and leather products 

Stone, clay and glass products 

Metalworking 

Electrical 

Transportation equipment 

Mining 

Construction 

Transportation (except seamen) 

Communications and public utility. . 

Trade and service 

Other skilled and semi-skilled 

Foremen 

Apprentices 



Unskilled Workers 

Food and tobacco 

Lumber and lumber products. 

Metalworking 

Construction 

Other unskilled workers 



GRAND TOTAL 



Unfilled Vacancies' 2 ) 



Male 



1,736 
4,527 

1,397 

702 

2 

264 

4,218 

58 
110 
602 

55 

43 

8 

648 

185 

9 

23 
510 
750 

49 
149 
854 

68 

97 

4,616 

138 

74 

29 

3,127 

1,248 



Female 



17,462 



1,525 
5,461 



1,514 
5,650 



35 
1,114 



10 

769 



110 

34 

11 

1 

641 

130 

14 

13 



484 



15,940 



Total 



3,261 
9,988 

2,911 

6,352 

2 

299 

5,332 



879 

610 

78 

130 



210 
9 

23 
510 
765 

49 
259 
888 

79 

98 

5,257 

268 

88 

42 

3,127 

1,732 



33,402 



Registrations for Employment 



Male 



7,040 
16,182 

7,286 

33,727 

1,633 

5,304 

144,225 

1,347 

2,602 

13,593 

1,063 

857 

481 

15,045 

2,612 

500 

1,813 

40,488 

27,927 

690 

5,165 

21,854 

3,207 

4,981 

113,934 

4,403 

12,363 

6,319 

59,537 

31,312 



329,331 



Female 



1,892 
45,839 

13,972 

25,700 

15 

445 

17,028 

435 
10,712 
124 
439 
792 

34 
746 
741 

30 



113 

3 

1,842 

725 

277 



20,110 

5,691 

417 

439 

1 

13,562 



125,001 



Total 



8,932 
62,021 

21,258 

59,427 

1,648 

5,749 

161,253 

1,782 
13,314 
13,717 

1,502 

1,649 

515 

15,791 

3,353 
530 

1,813 

40,497 

28,040 

693 

7,007 
22,579 

3,484 

4.987 

134,044 

10,094 
12,780 
6,758 
59,538 
44,874 



454,332 



<>) Preliminary— subject to revision. 

M Current vacancies only. Deferred vacancies are excluded. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



105 



TABLE D-4— REGISTRATIONS AT NOV. 30, 1961 AND DEC. 1, 1960 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Office 



Newfoundland 

Corner Brook .. 

Grand Falls >. 

St. John's '. 

Prince Edward Island. 

Charlottetown . 

Summerside 

No?a Scotia 

Amherst 

Bridgewater 

Halifax..... 

Inverness 

Kentville.... '.. 

Liverpool 

New Glasgow 

Springhill 

Sydney 

Sydney Mines* 

Truro 

Yarmouth 

New Brunswick 

Bathurst 

Campbellton 

Edmundston 

Fredericton 

Minto 

Moncton 

Newcastle 

Saint John 

St. Stephen 

Sussex 

Woodstock 

Quebec 

Alma 

Asbestos 

Baie Comeau 

Beauharnois 

Buckingham 

Causapscal 

Chandler 

Chicoutimi 

Cowansville 

Dolbeau 

Drummondville 

Farnham 

Forestville 

Gaspe 

Granby 

Hull 

Joliette 

Jonquiere 

Lachute 

La Malbaie 

La Tuque 

Levis 

Louiseville 

Magog 

Maniwaki , 

Matane 

Megantic , 

Mont-Laurier 

Montmagny 

Montreal 

New Richmond , 

Port Alfred 

Qu6bec 

Rimouski 

Riviere du Loup 

Roberval 

Rouyn , 

Ste. Agathe des Monts 
Ste. Anne de Belle vue. 

Ste. Therese 

St. Hyacinthe 

St. Jean , 

St. Jerome , 

Sept-Iles 

Shawinigan 

Sherbrooke 

Sore] 

Thetford Mines 

Trois-Rivieres 



Nov. 30, 
1961 



11,255 

2,443 
1,094 

7,718 

2,018 

-1,224 
794 

18,942 

646 

719 
4,723 

363 
1,328 

396 
2,062 

818 
4,284 

986 
1,315 
1.302 

15,934 

1,850 

1,177 

1,155 

1,242 

339 

3,856 

1,141 

2,857 

1,132 

386 

799 



129, 



937 

,572 
474 
672 
953 
745 
,183 
,137 
.032 
288 
,134 
,524 
432 
550 
870 
,694 
,900 
,585 
,250 
566 
978 
843 
,301 
779 
464 
552 
,492 
539 
704 
,287 
,755 
993 
673 
,383 
,668 
,531 
,210 
,439 
571 
707 
,587 
■ 417 
,621 
,242 
,400 
,510 
,994 
,674 
,040 
,548 



Dec. 1, 



15,278 

3,018 

1,533 

10,727 

2,543 

1,509 
1.034 

20,922 

968 

1,234 

5.265 

' 389 

2,023 

509 
2,509 

981 
3,960 



1.439 
1,645 

20,072 

2.600 
1,620 
1,129 
1,579 

473 
4,796 
1,512 
3,422 
1,315 

571 
1,055 

154,840 

1,342 

652 

533 

1,170 

984 

1,023 

647 

1.936 

380 

1,054 

2,147 

575 

336 

835 

2,330 

3,526 

3,625 

2,523 

809 

1,020 

649 

3,339 

1,115 

656 

760 

923 

989 

758 

1,165 

60, 156 

1,144 

605 

11,068 

2,574 

2.499 

1,049 

2,183 

801 

958 

2,208 

2,098 

2,098 

2,626 

1,748 

3,313 

4,446 

1,981 

1.458 

4,163 



Quebec— Concluded 

Val d'Or 

Valley field 

Victoria ville 

Ville St. Georges.. 

Ontario 

Amprior 

Barrie 

Belleville 

Braceb ridge 

Brampton 

Brantford 

Brock ville 

Carleton Place 

Chatham 

Cobourg 

Collingwood 

Cornwall , 

Elliot Lake 

Fort Erie 

Fort Frances 

Fort William 

Gait 

Oananoque. 

Goderich 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

Hawkesbury 

Kapuskasing 

Kenora 

Kingston 

Kirkland Lake — 

Kitchener 

Leamington 

Lindsay 

Listowel 

London 

Long Branch 

Midland 

Napanee 

Newmarket 

Niagara Falls 

North Bay 

Oakville 

Orillia 

Oshawa 

Ottawa 

Owen Sound 

Parry Sound 

Pembroke 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Picton 

Port Arthur 

Port Colborne 

Prescott 

Renfrew 

St. Catharines 

St. Thomas 

Sarnia 

Sault Ste. Marie. . . 

Simcoe 

Sioux Lookout 

Smiths Falls 

Stratford 

Sturgeon Falls 

Sudbury 

Tillsonburg 

Timmins , 

Toronto 

Trenton 

Walkert on 

Wallaceburg 

Welland 

Weston 

Windsor 

Woodstock 

Manitoba 

Brandon 

Dauphin 

Flin Flon , 

Portage la Prairie. 

The Pas 

Winnipeg 



Nov. 30, 
1961 



1,537 
1,695 
1,443 
1,799 

149,982 

310 

1,035 

1,615 

985 

1,036 

2,616 

566 

232 

1,877 

834 

614 

2,431 

635 

585 

647 

2,045 

1.122 

351 

482 

1,623 

10,974 

541 

1,084 

984 

2,217 

1,387 

2,006 



297 

3,835 

3,249 

696 

506 

1,136 

2,355 

1,455 

732 

787 

3,972 

6,317 

1,101 

511 

1,572 

456 

2,819 

302 

3,523 

768 

594 

369 

3,763 

1,245 

2,573 

2,213 

825 

242 

380 

689 

892 

3,227 

419 

2,085 

35,512 

571 

541 

584 

2,054 

3,208 

8,793 

864 

2*, 033 

1,772 
1,244 

223 
1,047 

346 
18,401 



106 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



TABLE D-4— REGISTRATIONS AT NOV. 30, 1961 AND DEC. 1, 1960 

(Source: National Employment Service, Unemployment Insurance Commission) 



Office 


Nov. 30, 
1961 


Dec. 1, 

1960 


Office 


Nov. 30, 
1961 


Dec. 1, 
I960 


Saskatchewan 


16,293 

417 

360 

1,416 

960 

1,980 

4,272 

3,610 

925 

443 

1,909 

28,105 

362 
8,994 

424 
12,444 

398 

800 
2,163 
1,290 
1,230 

58,834 

1,942 
982 


16,244 

506 

406 

1,474 

1,070 

2,004 

3,934 

3,740 

797 

437 

1,876 

30,872 

363 

10,805 

354 

13,029 

678 

854 

2,224 

1,209 

1,356 

72,402 

2,059 
1,411 


British Columbia— Concluded 


800 

840 

791 

1,370 

1,150 

158 

1,155 

987 

937 

9.1C5 

1,351 

636 

2,145 

1,425 

455 

983 

748 

24,797 

1,801 

3,724 

552 






1,114 

969 

880 

1,509 

1,254 

218 

1,406 

1 372 










North Battleford 




Prince Albert 












Swift Current 








1,186 

10,198 

1,341 

870 
2,884 
1 802 








Penticton 


Alberta 








Calgary 




Drumheller 




551 


Edmonton 




1,380 

918 

30,896 

2,169 

5 468 


Edson 


Trail 


















547 




CANADA 




British Columbia 


454,332 

329,331 
125,001 


537,979 

393,856 
144,123 


Chilliwack 




Courtenay 









1 Preliminary subject to revision. 

♦Prior to March 1961, the office at Sydney Mines, N.S. operated as a branch of the Sydney, N.S.. local office. 



E — Unemployment Insurance 

Unemployment insurance statistics are concerned with numbers of persons covered by 
insurance and claimants for benefit at Unemployment Insurance Commission local 
offices. The data are compiled in the Unemployment Insurance Section, D.B.S. from 
information supplied by the UIC. 

TABLE E-l— BENEFICIARIES AND BENEFIT PAYMENTS BY PROVINCE, OCTOBER 

1961 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 



Province 


Estimated 
Average 

Number of 
Beneficiaries 

Per Week 
(in thousands) 


Weeks 
Paid 


Amount 

of 

Benefit 

Paid 

$ 




3.4 
0.5 

8.4 

5.8 

51.2 

63.6 

7.2 

4.4 

7.9 

21.0 


14,126 

2,031 

35,380 

24,286 

214,945 

267,220 

30,058 

18,369 

32,998 

88,311 


302,577 




40,030 




799,782 




513,213 




4,982,307 




6,421,034 




695,539 




418,546 




788,271 




2,153,748 






Total, Canada, October 1961 


173.3 
173.2 
225.9 


727,724 
692,684 
903,403 


17,115,047 


Total, Canada, September 1961 


16,802,313 


Total, Canada, October 1960 . 


20,650,922 







THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY T962 



107 



TABLE E-2— CLAIMANTS CURRENTLY REPORTING TO LOCAL OFFICES BY 
NUMBER OF WEEKS ON CLAIM, PROVINCE AND SEX, AND PERCENTAGE 
POSTAL, OCTOBER 31, 1961 

(Counted on last working day of the month) 
Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 





Total 
Claimants 


Number of weeks on claim 


Percent- 
age 
Postal 


October 
31, 1960 

Total 
claimants 


Province and Sex 


2 or 
Less 


3-4 


5-8 


9-12 


13-16 


17-20 


Over 
20 




268,682 
185,454 
83,228 


104,835 
80,254 
24,581 


34,446 

24,754 

9,692 


40,863 
27,473 
13,390 


23,799 
14,800 
8,999 


16,323 
9,421 
6,902 


11,584 
6,380 
5,204 


36,832 
22,372 
14,460 


26.7 
27.8 
24.3 


330,223 




230,025 


Female 


100,198 




5,461 

4,513 

948 

765 
471 
294 

12,134 
9,332 
2,802 

9,272 

6,484 
2,788 

79,590 
55,591 
23,999 

90,451 
60,316 
30,135 

13,703 
9,782 
3,921 

7,356 
4,846 
2,510 

14,717 
9,474 
5,243 

35,233 
24,645 
10,588 


2,052 

1,843 

209 

289 
212 

77 

3,558 

2,845 

713 

3,341 
2,559 

782 

30,585 

23,481 

7,104 

35,051 
25,962 
9,089 

6,471 
5,122 
1,349 

2,573 

1,974 

599 

6,304 
4,820 
1,484 

14,611 
11,436 
3,175 


564 
455 
109 

73 
44 
29 

1,509 

1,176 

333 

1,259 
882 
377 

10,200 
7,648 
2,552 

11,749 
8,092 
3,657 

1,284 
886 
398 

1,051 
752 
299 

1,877 

1,207 

670 

4,880 
3,612 
1,268 


717 
565 
152 

115 
63 
52 

2,041 

1,553 

488 

1,392 
969 
423 

12,022 
8.4C7 
3,615 

13,761 
8,993 
4,768 

1,820 

1,187 

633 

1,238 
787 
451 

2,104 

1,166 

938 

5,653 
3,783 
1,870 


437 

341 

96 

64 
36 
28 

1,273 
970 
303 

766 
481 
285 

7,171 
4,542 
2,629 

8,158 
5,006 
3,152 

1,051 
672 
379 

740 
419 
321 

1,373 

685 
688 

2,766 
1,648 
1,118 


323 
229 
94 

50 
30 
20 

789 
548 
241 

573 
349 
224 

5,089 
2,931 
2,158 

5,451 
3,149 
2,302 

882 
513 
369 

494 
258 
236 

865 
411 
454 

1,807 

1,003 

804 


235 
161 

74 

46 
21 
25 

569 
395 
174 

393 

228 
165 

3,845 
2,090 
1,755 

3.765 
1,963 
1,802 

613 
370 
243 

323 
163 
160 

560 

284 
276 

1,235 
705 
530 


1,133 
919 
124 

128 
65 
63 

2,395 

1,845 

550 

1,548 

1,016 

532 

10,678 
6,492 
4,186 

12,516 
7,151 
5,365 

1,582 

1,032 

550 

937 
493 
444 

1,634 
901 
733 

4,281 
2,458 
1,823 


62.7 
64.8 
52.7 

55.3 
59.0 
49.3 

36.1 
37.0 
33.0 

51.8 
53.6 
47.7 

27.3 
28.2 
25.1 

20.3 
20.1 
20.6 

19.1 
20.4 
15.9 

42.1 
44.9 
36.7 

27.8 
30.7 
22.4 

24.9 
26.1 
22.1 


6,886 


Male 


5,718 




1,168 


Prince Edward Island 

Male 


896 
588 
308 




14,069 


Male 


11,277 




2,792 




11,286 




8,456 




2,830 




99,111 


Male 


67,991 




31,120 




118,603 




79,761 




38,842 




12,294 




8,185 




4,109 




6,917 




4.463 




2,454 




16,468 




11,305 




5,163 


British Columbia 


43,693 
32,281 




11,412 







TABLE E-3— INITIAL AND RENEWAL CLAIMS FOR BENEFIT BY PROVINCE, 

OCTOBER, 1981 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 



Province 


Claims filed at Local Offices 


Disposal of Claims and Claims Pending at 
End of Month 


Total* 


Initial 


Renewal 


Total 

Disposed 

oft 


Entitled 

to 
Benefit 


Not 
Entitled 

to 
Benefit 


Pending 




2,797 

385 

5,549 

5,045 

46,260 

54,436 

7.1C9 

4,648 

9,782 

22,049 


1,986 

263 

3,333 

3,057 

28,130 

32,429 

4,615 

3,194 

6,286 

13,577 


811 

122 

2,216 

1,988 

18,130 

22,007 

2,494 

1,454 

3,496 

8,472 


2,302 

328 

5,137 

4,580 

40,450 

54,723 

6,157 

4,010 

8,292 

20,351 


1,421 

236 

3,680 

3,355 

28,108 

39,061 

4,297 

2,715 

5,827 

13,937 


881 

92 

1,457 

1,225 

12,342 

15,662 

1,860 

1,295 

2,465 

6,414 


982 




113 




1,541 




1,460 




15,686 




16,003 




1,725 




1,382 




2,874 




6,118 






Total, Canada, October 1961 . . . 
Total, Canada, September 1961 
Total, Canada, October 1960. . . 


158,060 
121,980 
178,211 


96,870 
69,836 
103,919 


61,190 
52,144 
74,292 


146,330 
115,995 
162,512 


102,637 
84,698 
122,331 


43,693 
31,297 
40,181 


47,884 
36,154 
50,113 



* In addition, revised claims received numbered 38,732. 

t In addition, 37,739 revised claims were disposed of. Of these, 4,559 were special requests not granted and 1,730 
were appeals by claimants. There were 10,731 revised claims pending at the end of the month. 



108 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



TABLE E-4— ESTIMATES OF THE INSURED POPULATION UNDER THE UNEMPLOY- 
MENT INSURANCE ACT 

Source: Report on Operation of the Unemployment Insurance Act, D.B.S. 



End of: 



Total 



Employed 



Claimants 



1961— September 

August 

July 

June 

May 

April 

March 

February.. 
January . . 

1960— December. 
November 
October... 
September 



3,948,000 
3,987,000 
3,971,000 
3,943,000 
3,891,000 
4,126,000 
4,210,000 
4,247,000 
4,240,000 

4,251,000 
4,110,000 
4,002,000 
3,998,000 



3,718,800 
3,757,700 
3,715,700 
3,676,100 
3,550,000 
3,142,900 
3,372,000 
3,374,200 
3,393,100 

3,496,900 
3,624,800 
3,671,800 
3,718,500 



229,200 
229,300 
255,300 
266,900 
341,000 
713,100 
838,000 
872,800 
846,900 

754,100 
485,200 
330,200 
279,500 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY J 962 



109 



F — Prices 

TABLE F-l— TOTAL AND MAIN COMPONENTS OF THE CONSUMER PRICE INDEX 

1957 Weighted 

(1949 - 100) 

Calculated by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics 



— 


Total 


Food 


Housing 


Clothing 


Transpor- 
tation 


Health 

and 

Personal 

Care 


Recre- 
ation 
and 
Reading 


Tobacco 

and 
Alcohol 


1957— Year 


122.6 
125.7 
127.2 
128.4 

129.3 

129.2 
128.9 
129.1 
129.1 
129.0 
129.0 
129.0 
129.1 
129.1 
129.2 
129.7 
129.8 


118.6 
122.9 
122.2 
122.6 

124.2 

124.4 
124.0 
124.0 
123.9 
123.2 
123.5 
124.9 
125.3 
123.2 
123.3 
123.6 
124.5 


127.3 
129.3 
131.5 
132.9 

133.3 

133.2 
133.1 
133.2 
133.2 
132.9 
132.9 
132.9 
132.9 
133.5 
133.6 
133.7 
133.8 


108.2 
109.5 
109.7 
111.0 

112.4 

111.6 
111.5 
111.8 
111.9 
112.4 
112.5 
112.2 
112.1 
113.1 
113.6 
114.0 
113.7 


133.2 
136.6 
140.5 
141.1 

141.8 

141.1 

141.1 

141.0 

141.0 

141.8 

141.2 

138.7 

139.0 

140.0 

140. 

141.5 

141.1 


139.9 
146.6 
151.0 
154.8 

154.9 

155.0 
154.6 
154.4 
155.3 
155.3 
155.0 
155.1 
154.6 
155.0 
155.3 
156.7 
156.8 


134.2 
142.0 
144.4 
145.6 

146.6 

146.3 
146.7 
146.6 
145.5 
146.0 
145.8 
145.0 
145.4 
146.7 
146.2 
146.3 
146.3 


109.1 


1958— Year 


110.1 


1959— Year 


113.8 


1960— Year 


115.8 


1960 — December 


115.8 




115.8 




115.7 




115.7 




115.8 


May 


115.8 




115.8 


July 


115.8 




116.1 




117.3 




117.3 




117.3 




117.3 







TABLE F-2— CONSUMER PRICE INDEXES FOR REGIONAL CITIES OF CANADA AT 
THE BEGINNING OF NOVEMBER 1961 

(1949 = 100) 





Total 


Food 


Shelter 


Clothing 


House- 
hold 
Operation 


Other 
Commo- 
dities 
and 
Services 




Nov. 1960 


Oct. 1961 


Nov. 1961 


<»St. John's, Nfld 


115.9 
128.4 
130.0 
129.7 
130.2 
131.9 
127.7 
125.5 
125.7 
130.8 


116.5 
129.2 
130.8 
130.4 
132.1 
132.5 
128.7 
126.8 
126.0 
129.6 


116.4 
129.7 
130.8 
130.8 
131.8 
131.9 
128.9 
126.4 
125.7 
130.1 


110.5 
121.6 
125.2 
131.1 
125.4 
123.4 
127.2 
124.4 
120.3 
124.9 


114.5 
137.6 
141.5 
146.8 
149.7 
152.3 
136.8 
124.4 
125.7 
137.0 


110.5 
123.4 
120.9 
108.1 
119.4 
117.5 
119.0 
123.5 
121.6 
116.4 


111.9 
130.7 
124.5 
120.2 
123.0 
125.9 
120.5 
126.6 
127.8 
135.7 


132.8 


Halifax 


140.9 




144.4 




140.4 




142.7 




141.3 




137.5 




131.5 




134.1 




137 5 







N.B. Indexes above measure percentage changes in prices over time in each city and should not be used to compare 
actual levels of prices as between cities. 

<!> St. John's index on the base June 1951 = 100. 



110 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



G — Strikes and Lockouts 
TABLE G-l— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 1956-1961 



Month or Year 



Strikes and 

Lockouts 

Beginning 

During Month 

or Year 



Strikes and Lockouts in Existence During Month or Year 



Strikes and 
Lockouts 



Workers 
Involved 



Duration in Man-Days 



Man-Days 



Per Cent of 

Estimated 

Working Time 



1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1960: November 
December. 

"1961: January 

February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September, 

October 

November 



221 
242 
253 
203 
268 

27 
12 



229 
249 
262 
218 

274 



91,409 
112,397 
100,127 

49,408 

5,578 
1,895 

2,346 

1,601 

4,426 

6,265 

12,001 

12,323 

8,826 

8,067 

10,664 

41,043 

11,032 



1,246,000 
1,634,880 
2,872,340 
2,286,900 
738,700 

52,640 
30,190 

28,140 
20,320 
41,160 
59,240 
107,480 
128,020 
94,560 
64,570 
105,500 
428,650 
123,940 



0.11 
0.14 
0.24 
0.19 
0.06 

0.05 
0.03 

0.03 
0.02 
0.04 
0.06 
0.10 
0.12 
C.09 
0.06 
0.09 
0.39 
0.11 



* Preliminary. 



TABLE G-2— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 
NOVEMBER 1961, BY INDUSTRY 

(Preliminary) 



TABLE G-3— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS, 
NOVEMBER 1961, BY JURISDICTION 

(Preliminary) 



Industry 


Strikes 

and 
Lockouts 


Workers 
Involved 


Man- 
Days 




1 


220 


2,200 


Fishing 






2 

21 
13 
3 
1 
4 
3 


1,022 

2,841 

4,787 

1,028 

200 

112 

822 


11,040 




30,780 




56,900 


Transportation, etc 

Public utilities 


4,010 
430 


Trade 


2,290 


Service 


16,290 


All industries 


48 


11,032 


123,940 



Jurisdiction 


Strikes 

and 

Lockouts 


Workers 
Involved 


Man- 
Days 




















1 

2 

8 

30 

1 


572 

187 

1,755 

7,295 

40 


1,140 




440 




22,780 




91,660 




800 








1 

4 

1 


115 

184 
884 


170 


British Columbia 


4,000 
2,950 






All jurisdictions 


48 


11,032 


123,940 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



111 



TABLE G-4— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS INVOLVING 100 OR MORE WORKERS, 

NOVEMBER 1961 

(Preliminary) 



Industry- 
Employer 
Location 



Logging 

Henry Selin Forest Products, 

Nassau Lake, Ont. 



Mining 
Metal Mining 
Opemiska Copper Mines, 
Chapais, Que. 



Coal etc. 

Dominion Coal (No. 18 Colliery), 

New Victoria, N.S. 



Manufacturing 
Textile Products 
Canadian Industries Ltd. 
New Toronto, Ont. 



Hamilton Cotton and 

Trent Cotton, 
Dundas, Hamilton and 

Trenton, Ont. 

Wood Products 

Canadian Office and School 

Furniture, 
Preston, Ont. 

Dominion Ayers, 
Ayersville, Que. 

Iron and Steel Products 
Royal Typewriter, 
Montreal, Que. 

Transportation Equipment 
Fruehauf Trailer, 
Dixie, Ont. 

Electrical Apparatus and Supplies 
Universal Cooler, 
Barrie, Ont. 

Canadian Westinghouse, 
Toronto, Ont. 

Non-Metallic Mineral Products 
Canada Cement, 
Montreal, Que. 

Canada Cement, 
Pointe Anne, Ont. 

Canada Cement, 
Port Colborne, Ont. 

Canada Cement, 
Woodstock, Ont. 

Construction 
Toronto Sheet Metal 

Labour Bureau, 
Toronto, Ont. 



Structural Steel Erectors 
Association of Ontario, 

Toronto, Hamilton, other 
centres, Ont. 



Union 



Carpenters Loc. 2995 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 



Mining Employees' 
Federation (CNTU) 



Mine Workers Loc. 7557 
(Ind.) 



Mine Workers District 50 
(Ind.) 



Textile Workers' Union 
Locs. 723, 974 and 979 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 



Carpenters Loc. 3189 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 



Carpenters Loc. 3263 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 



Steelworkers Loc. 4711 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 



Auto Workers Loc. 252 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 



Auto Workers Loc. 700 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 



U.E. Loc. 512 (Ind.) 



Cement Workers Loc. 215 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 



Cement Workers Loc. 219 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 



Cement Workers Loc. 305 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 



Cement Workers Loc. 368 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 



Sheet Metal Workers Loc. 
30 (AFL-CIO/CLC) 



Structural Iron Workers, 
various locs. 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 



Workers 
Involved 



220 



450 



572 



2 OS 



777 



127 



133 

(26) 



161 

102 
143 

400 

150 
108 
123 

500 



Duration in 
Man- Days 



Novem- 
ber 



2,200 



,900 



1,140 



620 
3,110 

2,330 

2,930 

1,440 

3,540 

2,070 
290 

4,400 
1,650 
1,200 
1,350 

10,500 
12,560 



A ccu- 
mulated 



13,500 



1,140 



620 
3,110 

7,420 

6,680 

1,440 

6,360 

3,210 
290 

4,400 
1,650 
1,200 
1,350 

32,100 
39,290 



Starting 
Date 

Termi- 
nation 
Date 



Oct. 3 
Nov. 13 



Oct. 20 



Nov. 1 
Nov. 3 



Nov. 27 
Nov. 30 



Nov. 27 



Sep. 22 



Nov. 3 
Nov. 22 



Oct. 5 



Oct. 


16 


Nov. 


29 


Nov. 


16 


Nov. 


16 


Nov. 


16 


Nov. 


16 



Sep. 11 
Nov. 29 



Sep. 12 
Nov. 20 



Major Issues 
Result 



Wages, hours, working 
conditions, seniority~7fi 
an hr. increase in planing 
mill, 10^ an hr. in saw-mill, 
higher piece work rates; 
improved working con- 
ditions. 



Job classification, sickness 
and accident insurance, 
seniority, union security~ 



Arrangements for return- 
ing to surface after com- 
pletion of "task work"~ 
Return of workers pending 
negotiations. 



Wages, hours~ll|!i an hr. 
increase, five day week 
Monday to Friday. 



Wages- 



Union security 



Wages ' 



Wages~Wage increase of 
H an hr. 



Wages, hours, overtime' 



Wages, union recognition~ 



Wages, seniority, holi- 
days'^ 



Wages, fringe benefits' 
Wages, fringe benefits' 
Wages, fringe benefits' 
Wages, fringe benefits' 



Wages, travelling time~ 
\bt an hr. retroactive to 
Sep. 1, 1961, 3^ an hr. 
effective May 1, 1962. 

Wages, fringe benefits^ 
10f* an hr. increase, plus li 
an hr. for welfare fund 
Jan. 1,1962, U May 1,1962. 



112 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 7962 



TABLE G-4— STRIKES AND LOCKOUTS INVOLVING 100 OR MORE WORKERS, 

NOVEMBER 1981 

(Preliminary) 



Industry 


Union 


Workers 
Involved 


Duration in 
Man- Days 


Starting 
Date 

Termi- 
nation 
Date 


Major Issues 


Employer 
Location 


Novem- 
ber 


Accu- 
mulated 


Result 


Windsor Builders and 

Contractors Exchange, 
Windsor, Ont. 


I.B.E.W. Loc. 773 other 
building trades unions 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


1,900 


24,700 


74,640 


Sep. 20 
Nov. 20 


Wages, fringe benefits~ 
25-300 an hr. over a 2-yr. 
period, improved fringe 
benefits. 


Toronto Builders Exchange, 
Toronto, Ont. 


Structural Iron Workers 
Loc. 721 (AFL-CIO/CLC) 


270 


5,130 


7,290 


Oct. 20 

Nov. 28 


Wages~lO0 an hr. increase 
immediately, 50 an hr. 
Jan. 1, 1962, 30 an hr. May 
1, 1962; 50 an hr. to welfare 
fund starting Jan. 1962. 


Ontario Lathing Contractors, 
Toronto, Ont. 


Lathers Loc. 97 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


100 


1,800 


1,800 


Nov. 7 


Alleged failure to honour 
agreements 


Brown & Root, 
Windfall, Alta. 


Plumbers Loc. 488 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


115 


170 


170 


Nov. 7 
Nov. 9 


Living conditions in camp 
~ Return of workers. 


Meco Electric, 
Smiths Falls, Ont. 


I.B.E.W. Loc. 586 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


161 


160 


160 


Nov. 22 
Nov. 23 


Pay for travelling time~ 
Return of workers pending 
further negotiations. 


Saint John Builders' Exchange, 
Saint John, N.B. 


Carpenters Loc. 1386 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


184 


370 


370 


Nov. 27 


Wages, working conditions, 
paid statutory holidays, 
union security ~ 


Bedford District Contractors 

Association, 
Granby and district, Que. 


Building Workers' 
Federation (CNTU) 


505 


510 


510 


Nov. 30 


Wages, hours, union secu- 
rity ~ 


Transportation Etc. 

Transportation 

Five automobile hauling firms, 

Various centres, Que. and Ont. 














Teamsters Loc. 880 (Ind.) 


884 


2,950 


2,950 


Nov. 26 


Wages, control of welfare 
fund~ 


Four automobile hauling firms, 
Oakville, Oshawa, Windsor, 
other points, Ont. 


Teamsters Loc. 880 (Ind.) 


111 


370 


370 


Nov. 26 


Wages, control of welfare 
fund~ 


Public Utility Operation 
Hydro Electric Power 

Commission, 
Hamilton, Ont. 


I.B.E.W. Loc. 138 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


200 


430 


430 


Nov. 10 
Nov. 12 


Wages, fringe benefits^ 
Wage increase, improved 
fringe benefits. 


Service 

Governmen t Service 

City of Hamilton, 

Hamilton, Ont. 


International Operating 
Engineers Loc. 700 
(AFL-CIO) 


135 


770 


3,950 


Sep. 28 

Nov. 8 


Wages~Wage increase, im- 
proved fringe benefits. 


Personal Service 
Royal York Hotel, 
Toronto, Ont. 


Hotel Employees Loc. 299 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) 


675 


15,210 


134,790 


Apr. 24 


Wages ~ 



Figures in parentheses indicate the number of workers indirectly affected. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY J 962 



113 



Technical Note to "G" Tables 



Statistical information on work stoppages in 
Canada is compiled by the Economics and 
Research Branch of the Department of Labour 
on the basis of reports from the Unemployment 
Insurance Commission. The first three tables 
in this section contain data covering strikes and 
lockouts involving six or more workers and 
lasting at least one working day, and strikes 
and lockouts lasting less than one day or 
involving fewer than six workers but exceeding 
a total of nine man-days. 

The developments leading to work stoppages 
are often too complex to make it practicable 
to distinguish statistically between strikes on 
the one hand and lockouts on the other. How- 
ever, a work stoppage that is clearly a lockout 
is not often encountered. 

The data on workers involved include all 
workers reported on strike or locked out, 
whether or not they all belonged to the unions 
directly involved in the disputes leading to 
work stoppages. Where the number of workers 
involved varied in the course of the stoppage, 
the maximum number is used for monthly totals, 
but adjustments are made for changes reported 
in the number of workers involved in work 
stoppages extending over two or more months. 
Workers indirectly affected, such as those 
laid off as a result of a work stoppage, are 
not included in the data on workers involved. 
Their number, however, if any, is shown in 
parentheses for the major work stoppages listed 
in Table G-4. The data in parentheses are 
those reported at an early stage of the work 
stoppage, and they refer only to the plant 
or premises at which the stoppage occurred. 

Duration of strikes and lockouts in man- 
days is calculated by multiplying the number 
of workers involved in each work stoppage by 
the number of working days the work stop- 
page was in progress. Where the number of 
workers involved varied significantly in the 
course of the stoppage, an appropriate adjust- 
ment is made in the calculation as far as this is 
practicable. The duration in man-days of 
all stoppages in a month or year is also shown 
as a percentage of estimated working time, 
based on the corresponding monthly figure or 
annual average figure for non-agricultural paid 
workers in Canada. The data on duration of 
work stoppages in man-days are provided to 
facilitate comparison of work stoppages in 



terms of a common denominator; they are 
not intended as a measure of the loss of 
productive time to the economy. For con- 
venience of expression, however, duration in 
man-days is on occasion referred to as "time 
loss" in reviews based on this series. 

The data on the distribution of work stop- 
pages by industry in Table G-2 follow the 
Standard Industrial Classification, D.B.S. (1948). 

In Table G-3 work stoppages are classified 
according to jurisdiction, whether federal or 
provincial. This is done on the basis of the 
governmental agency that intervened in the 
dispute. Where there was no such intervention 
the classification is, wherever possible, on the 
basis of the agency that previously dealt with 
labour matters in the establishment involved. 

Work stoppages involving 100 or more 
workers are listed in Table G-4, which shows 
in each instance the employer (s) and the 
location of the premises at which the work 
stoppage occurred, the union (s) directly in- 
volved or concerned in the dispute, number of 
workers involved, duration in man-days, starting 
date (the first day on which normal operations 
were affected) and termination date. For 
work stoppages that are terminated by mutual 
agreement, the termination date is usually the 
day on which work was resumed. Work stop- 
pages that have not been resolved in this way 
are as a rule considered terminated, for statis- 
tical purposes, at the date by which it was 
established that two-thirds or more of the 
workers involved had either returned to work, 
or had found work with other employers, or 
had been replaced by new employees; or the 
date by which it was reported that the opera- 
tions affected by the work stoppage would not 
be resumed. Also shown in Table G-4 are the 
major issues, as far as known, that led to 
work stoppage, and the result, i.e., the terms of 
settlement of major issues where a settlement 
was reached when the work stoppage ter- 
minated, or the circumstances in which the 
work stoppage came to an end. 

While the methods used to obtain data on 
work stoppages are not likely to lead to 
major omissions, it is not always possible, 
particularly on a preliminary basis, to obtain 
precise information in detail. Consequently the 
information in this section may not be accurate 
in all respects. 



114 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 



H — Industrial Accidents 

TABLE H-l— INDUSTRIAL FATALITIES IN CANADA DURING THE THIRD 
QUARTER OF 1961 BY GROUPS OF INDUSTRIES AND CAUSES 



Cause 


3 
a 

So 

< 


,3 


b0 
C 

"o. 
a 

*a 

a 

s3 

s 

to 


C 

i 

D 

O" 

X) 

§ 

.5 
'3 

3 


60 

c 

a 

1 

c 

eS 


a 

.2 

1 
g 

1 
o 
U 


CO 

D 
.2 

3 

3 


M 
S3 O! 

a.g 

.2 c 

ii 

&o 

go 


o> 

1 


o 
Q 

c 

S3 

i 


8 

> 

1 


73 

J 

c 

p 


I 






























Struck by: 




l 






1 


3 
6 
12 
5 
5 






1 

"*2 
1 
2 








6 










"i 


5 

3 

1 

17 




2 
2 
2 
2 

1 
1 

1 


.... 


n 




3 
10 

1 


15 




8 
2 

1 

2 
3 


5 
6 
4 

1 
11 

2 

9 
5 

1 


^n 




?8 




2 

1 
1 




35 


Falls and slips: 


^ 


(b) To different levels 


2 
2 


23 
5 




2 






\"\ 


Conflagrations, temperature extremes and explosions 

Inhalation, absorptions, asphyxiation and industrial 






10 






5 
2 










14 










10 


3 


1 

1 


1 
1 




1 
1 




?S 










4 


















Total, third quarter 1961 


18 

26 


20 
25 


n 


23 
57 


45 
58 


69 
74 


4 
12 


30 

54 


8 
10 




13 
35 


1 


331* 


Total third quarter 1960 


3V> 







*Of this total 186 fatalities were reported by the various provincial Workmen's Compensation Boards and the Board 
of Transport Commissioners; details of the remaining 45 were obtained from other non-official sources. 



TABLE H-3— INDUSTRIAL FATALITIES BY PROVINCE AND GROUPS OF 
INDUSTRIES DURING THE THIRD QUARTER OF 1961 



Industry 


"6 


l-H 






i 

Of 


c 
O 


c 

S3 


M 
1 


< 


6 
PQ 




1 








1 
1 


.... 


4 
1 


8 
3 


1 


2 


2 






18 






14 




20 


















2 




2 
2 
3 






6 
29 
17 

2 

14 

4 


5 


2 


3 

2 
10 


3 
7 
12 




23 




i 

5 


4 
16 
2 

3 


45 




2 




2 


2 


69 


Public Utilities 


4 


Transportation, Storage and Corn- 


2 
1 


1 




1 


1 
1 




3 
1 


5 
1 




30 


Trade 


8 


























4 
1 




4 


3 


2 




13 














1 


























Total 


7 


1 


9 


8 


30 


88 


10 


10 


24 


44 




231 







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116 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • JANUARY 1962 




CANADA 



THE 



BOUR 




Conciliation Board Reports in Disputes between 
Locomotive Engineers and C.N.R. (p. 159) 
Locomotive Engineers and C.P.R. (p. 180) 



LIBRARY 






.* MAR 28 i^r 

4 *S.""' ' 




Published Monthly by the 

ARTMENT OF LABOUR 

CANADA 



Vol. LXII 



No. 2 



FEBRUARY 28, 1962 



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(Continued on page three of cover) 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 

Official Journal of the Department of Labour, Canada 

Hon. Michael Starr, Minister George V. Haythorne, Deputy Minister 



Published Monthly in 
English and French 



Editorial Staff 



Editor 

W. S. Drinkwater 



Assistant Editor 

R. M. Dyke 

Editor, French Edition 

Guy de Merlis 

Circulation Manager 

J. E. Abbey 



Cover Photograph 
National Film Board 



Vol. LXII, No. 2 CONTENTS February 28, 1962 

Division on Older Workers 118 

50 Years Ago This Month 119 

Notes of Current Interest 120 

The Tritschler Report 123 

Canada and the Colombo Plan 130 

Annual Convention of Religion-Labour Council of Canada 132 

Sixth Annual Convention of Quebec Federation of Labour 135 

Latest Labour Statistics 140 

Employment and Unemployment, January 141 

Collective Bargaining in January 145 

Chamber of Commerce on Rehabilitation 151 

The Women Workers of Denmark 152 

International Labour Organization: 

Morse Withdraws Resignation 153 

Teamwork in Industry 154 

Industrial Relations: 

Certification Proceedings 155 

Conciliation Proceedings 158 

Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment No. 1 211 

Labour Law: 

Legal Decisions Affecting Labour 219 

Recent Regulations under Provincial Legislation 224 

Annual Report of British Chief Inspector of Factories 225 

Unemployment Insurance: 

Monthly Report on Operation 231 

Decisions of the Umpire 232 

National Employment Service: 

Monthly Report on Operations 236 

Labour Conditions in Federal Government Contracts 237 

Prices and the Cost of Living 244 

Publications Recently Received in Department's Library — 246 

LABOUR STATISTICS 249 



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subscriptions to the Circulation Manager. Subscriptions — Canada: $3 per year, single copies 
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cheque or post office money order, payable to the Receiver-General of Canada, to The Queen's 
Printer, % Superintendent of Government Publications, Ottawa. All subscriptions payable in 
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Authorized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Department, Ottawa. 
53741-5—1 



«1 



The Department of Labour Today 



Division on Older Workers 



In accordance with a directive from Hon. 
Michael Starr, Minister of Labour, to in- 
tensify efforts on behalf of older workers, 
the Division on Older Workers was estab- 
lished by the Department of Labour and 
placed under the direction of the National 
Co-ordinator, Civilian Rehabilitation. 

It began operations on a full-time basis 
in 1959. Its functions include co-ordination 
of departmental activities in the field; de- 
velopment of educational efforts in co- 
operation with the Information Branch; 
encouragement of research in co-operation 
with the Economics and Research Branch 
and other agencies; liaison with voluntary 
agencies and provincial government depart- 
ments interested in problems of aging; hold- 
ing a watching brief on developments in 
other countries and liaison with agencies 
abroad; supplying of secretarial services to 
the Interdepartmental Committee on Older 
Workers; and the assembly and dissemina- 
tion of information. 

The Division has assembled the following 
material, which may be obtained free by 
writing to the Division on Older Workers, 
Civilian Rehabilitation, Department of 
Labour, Ottawa. 

Speaking Out About the Older Worker 
Problem. A series of radio broadcasts. 
Available in French and English. 
Pertinent Facts About the Older Worker. 
A reference manual, prepared and assembled 
by the Information Branch, Department of 
Labour, Ottawa, June 1961. 
Discrimination Against Older Workers. A 
reprint of an article from the International 
Labour Review, Vol. LXXXII, No. 4, April 
1961, by the Division on Older Workers. 
Available in French and English. (Limited 
supply.) 

Don't Judge A Man's Worth By His Date 
of Birth. An examination of the myth of 
the older worker — a series of articles pre- 
pared by the Information Branch, Depart- 
ment of Labour. 

Here's Five Step Program That Could 
Work For You. By E. J. Hickey, reproduced 
from The Financial Post, June 24, 1961. 
How Safe Are Your Older Workers? By 
V. A. Broadhurst, reproduced from Indus- 
trial Welfare. 

The Care of the Geriatric Citizen. A study 
by the New Brunswick Association of 
Registered Nurses. 

Why EX at XL? A digest of two case 
studies of the relation between age and 
selected characteristics of sales personnel in 



two department stores, by Douglas G. 
Dainton. 

Productivity of Older Workers. By Leon 
Greenberg, March 1961 issue of The 
Gerontologist. 

Pension Plans and the Employment of 
Older Workers. A "2 minutes of employ- 
ment facts" folder prepared by the Informa- 
tion Branch, Department of Labour. 
How Canada's First Proper Purchasing 
Power Pension Plan Will Operate. James L. 
Clare, M.A. 

Industrial Pension Plans — 1959. School of 
Business Administration of the University 
of Western Ontario, R. E. Sproule and J. J. 
Wettlaufer. 

Portable Pensions. By J. C. Maynard. 
A Summary of Findings of a Study of 
Canadian Pension Plans — 1960. 
The Preservation of Pension Rights. Ontario 
Department of Economics, 1960. 
Vesting Provision in Pension Plans. Walter 
W. Kolodrubetz, U.S. Department of Labor. 
Housing for Older People. Humphrey 
Carver, Central Mortgage and Housing 
Corporation. 

What Does Old Age Mean to You? Miss 
Hazeldine Bishop, Executive Assistant, 
Older Persons Section of the Montreal 
Council of Social Agencies. 
Barriers Can Disappear. Ian Campbell, Na- 
tional Co-ordinator, Civilian Rehabilitation, 
Department of Labour, Ottawa. 
Let's Eliminate Age Barriers in Hiring. 
H. L. Douse, Chief, Division on Older 
Workers, Civilian Rehabilitation, Depart- 
ment of Labour. 
National Employment Service and the Older 
Worker. C. A. Murchison, Commissioner, 
Unemployment Insurance Commission, 
Ottawa. 

The Older Woman and the Working World. 
Miss Marion V. Royce, Director of the 
Women's Bureau, Department of Labour, 
Ottawa. 

Retirement Practices and Their Implications. 
A. Andras, Director of Legislation, Cana- 
dian Labour Congress, Ottawa. 
Do You Support Your Pension Plan Or 
Does Your Pension Plan Work For You? 
James L. Clare, M.A., F.S.A., Actuarial 
Consultant and former Professor of Actu- 
arial Mathematics at the University of 
Manitoba. 

Occupational Medicine and the Older 
Worker. Dr. D. K. Grant, Director of 
Medical Services, Hydro-Electric Power 
Commission of Ontario. 



118 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



From the Labour Gazette, February 1912 

50 Years Ago This Month 

Annual convention of British Columbia Federation of Labour (TLC) and TLC's 
annual brief to federal Cabinet both request repeal of Industrial Disputes 
Investigation Act. B.C. Federation discusses question of political action 



Political action was one of the leading 
questions discussed at the 1912 convention 
of the British Columbia Federation of 
Labour (TLC), a report of which was given 
in the February 1912 Labour Gazette. The 
five-day convention was attended by 86 
delegates, compared with an attendance of 
60 the year before. 

The resolution on political action adopted 
by the convention "after several hours 
debate" decided that "the question of the 
endorsation of the doctrines of socialism 
be submitted to specially summoned meet- 
ings of the affiliated unions, returns of the 
vote to be sent to the Secretary-Treasurer of 
the Federation for compilation." 

Other resolutions approved, among the 80 
or more submitted, requested the repeal 
of the Lemieux Act [The Industrial Disputes 
Investigation Act, 1907], condemned the 
employment of Chineses cooks in railway 
construction camps, approved the supply of 
free text books in schools, opposed exemp- 
tion of church property from taxation, 
favoured women's suffrage, advocated 
government control of telephones, favoured 
abolition of money deposits in elections, 
commended the federal Government's 
annuity scheme, favoured separate schools 
for Asiatics, and endorsed the B.C. Federa- 
tionists as the official organ of the Federa- 
tion. The delegates also supported a 48- 
hour week for cooks and waiters, and 
amendment of the Workmen's Compensa- 
tion Act. 

The convention increased the per capita 
tax to 2 cents from 1 cent per number. 

Repeal of the Industrial Disputes Investi- 
gation Act was requested also, early in 
January, in the annual submission to the 
federal Government by the Trades and 
Labour Congress of Canada. A deputation 
from the TLC met in the Prime Minister's 
office with the Prime Minister, Rt. Hon. R. 
L. Borden; Hon. T. W. Crothers, Minister 
of Labour; and Hon. L. P. Pelletier, Post- 
master General. 

"The deputation comprised the majority 
of the members of the executive committee 
and Mr. J. G. O'Donoghue, the Parliament- 
ary Solicitor of the Trades and Labour 
Congress," the Labour Gazette reported. 
"The deputation was introduced by Mr. P. 
M. Draper, the Secretary of the Congress." 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 

53741-5— 1J 



Among other matters, the delegation 
questioned the advisability of continuing 
public grants to the Grand Trunk Pacific 
Railway Company in view of the dispute 
between the company and certain of its 
employees in Western Canada; and made 
representations on behalf of the letter car- 
riers, urging superannuation, improvements 
in uniforms, an increase in provincial allow- 
ances, and improved classification. 

The deputation dealt also with Asiatic 
immigration, the eight-hour-day law, the 
abolition of the Senate, improvement of 
sanitary conditions in construction camps, 
and the extension of the fair wage clause to 
cases in which government funds were 
granted in aid of the construction of public 
buildings. 

The Labour Gazette reported that in the 
Speech from the Throne at the opening 
of the fourth session of the Second Legisla- 
ture of Saskatchewan, "It was announced 
that the Government had practically com- 
pleted arrangements, in conjunction with the 
three great railway companies operating in 
the province, for a careful examination into 
the feasibility and cost of diverting the 
water of the south branch of the Saskatche- 
wan River for purposes of irrigation." 

A strike by 52 pulp mill hands at St. 
George, N.B., which began on April 26, 

1911, was still going on when the Gazette 
of February 1912 went to press. The cause 
of the strike had been the refusal of the 
employer to grant a demand for an eight- 
hour day instead of one of thirteen and 
eleven hours, with an increase in minimum 
wages. 

In another strike, of iron moulders in 
London, Ont., which began in June as a 
result of the refusal of three firms to grant 
the same minimum wage for a nine-hour 
day as had been paid for one of ten hours, 
the Gazette reported that industrial condi- 
tions had ceased to be affected. Out of 60 
men who were originally involved, only six 
were still out of employment in January 

1912, the rest having "either found work 
on the terms demanded, or secured other 
employment." 

Firefighters in Ottawa, numbering 70, 
besides gaining an increase in wages of $50 
a year, were granted one day off in eight 
instead of one in twelve or fourteen. 



119 



NOTES OF CURRENT INTEREST 



Throne Speech Forecasts Increase in Old Age Pensions 



Increases in old age pensions, in old age 
assistance, and in payments to blind or 
disabled persons were among the changes 
in social legislation forecast in the Speech 
from the Throne read at the opening of the 
fifth session of the 24th Parliament on 
January 18. 

After obtaining the provinces' concur- 
rence for an amendment to the British 
North America Act, the Government intends 
to introduce a contributory system of old 
age pensions and related survivors' and 
disability benefits in addition to the existing 
old age pension. The legislation to bring 
this into effect would "take into account 
private pension arrangements and the need 
for legislation concerning portability of 
pension rights." 

Another measure proposed was the 
appropriation of "monies required in the 
Unemployment Insurance Fund to safe- 
guard the rights of workers until the report 
of the special committee inquiring into the 
unemployment insurance program has been 
received and can be acted upon." 

The Speech gave notice of legislation to 
require business and labour organizations to 
submit reports on the extent and nature of 
their operations "and whether, and to what 
extent, they may be owned or controlled 
outside Canada." 

In addition to a larger Municipal Winter 
Works Incentive Program, already an- 
nounced, Parliament will be asked to 
approve other measures to stimulate 
economic activity. Among these will be: the 
construction of a railway from Matane to 
Ste. Anne des Monts, Que.; construction 
of a floodway and other works to conserve 
and control the waters of the Red and 
Assiniboine Rivers in Manitoba; an increase 
in the total amount of financing of exports 
that can be undertaken by the Exports 
Credits Insurance Corporation; an amend- 
ment to broaden the scope of the Small 
Business Loans Act; and the institution 
of an automobile ferry service between 
North Sydney, N.S., and Argentia, Nfld., 
and construction of the necessary vessel and 
docks. 

The Prime Minister has invited the pro- 
vincial Governments "to join with the 
federal Government in early discussions of 
the steps that might be taken toward the 
establishment of long-distance power trans- 
missions to link provinces and eventually the 
different regions of Canada." 



Parliament will be asked to provide for 
an expanded program of encouragement to 
scientific research by industry in Canada, 
an increase in federal grants to universities, 
and "a measure relating to the Senate" will 
be introduced. 

Acreage payments to farmers affected by 
the drought in the Prairie Provinces would 
be asked for from Parliament, and legisla- 
tion would be proposed to extend the period 
of application of the Farm Improvement 
Loans Act and the Fisheries Improvement 
Loans Act, the Speech stated. 

An amendment to the Civilian War Pen- 
sions and Allowances Act will be sought to 
authorize the payment of allowances, under 
specified conditions, to merchant seamen, 
fire-fighters, foresters, members of voluntary 
aid detachments and certain other civilians 
with war service overseas. 

The Government, in recent international 
meetings, "has reiterated its support for the 
expansion of world trade on a multilateral 
non-discriminatory basis and its readiness 
to play a constructive role in the promotion 
of world trade," the Speech said. 



Dept. Appoints Co-ordinator, 
Emergency Manpower Planning 

George E. Simmons of Ottawa has been 
appointed Co-ordinator, Emergency Man- 
power Planning, in the Department of 
Labour. 

In his new post Mr. Simmons, who has 
had wide executive experience, will be 
responsible for co-ordinating the activities 
of all the Department's branches concerned 
with manpower and industrial relations plan- 
ning in case of emergency. He will also 
carry on liaison with government depart- 
ments and agencies on the manpower aspects 
of their emergency planning. 

Born in St. Albans, England, Mr. Sim- 
mons has lived in Canada since 1929. From 
that time until the outbreak of the Second 
World War, he served with the Bank of 
Montreal in Saskatchewan, Manitoba and 
Ontario. 

During the war he served with the Royal 
Canadian Army Service Corps, both in 
Canada and overseas, rising to the rank of 
Lieutenant-Colonel. 

With the cessation of hostilities he 
returned to the Bank of Montreal for a brief 
period before taking up the appointment of 
Chief Administrative Officer, Boy Scouts of 
Canada. He has held this post for the past 
15 years. 



120 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



TUC: 'British Higher Education 
Doesn't Meet Modern Needs' 

The Trades Union Congress has sub- 
mitted a 5,000-word report to the British 
Government's Committee on Higher Educa- 
tion in response to a request for its views on 
certain aspects of the problem. The com- 
mittee was established by the Government 
"to review the pattern of full-time higher 
education in Britain and in the light of the 
nation's needs and resources to advise the 
Government on what principles its long-term 
development should be planned. . . " 

The TUC report states that the present 
provision of higher education is inadequate 
for modern needs, that it falls short on two 
counts: 

1. It does not match the educational 
needs of large numbers of young people. 

2. It does not meet the economic, social 
and political needs of the community. 

To remedy these deficiencies, says the 
TUC, a substantial and sustained general 
expansion of higher educational facilities is 
required. 

Commenting on the first deficiency the 
TUC pointed out that social and economic 
factors still limit the number of children of 
manual workers who seek higher education. 
If children of manual workers had sought 
admission to universities in 1955-56 in 
numbers proportionate to the number of 
such workers in the adult male population, 
it would have been necessary to provide 
places for some 50,000 students instead of 
the 18,000 who were admitted that year. 
The Congress based these figures on the 
findings of an inquiry commissioned by the 
vice-chancellors and principals of Britain's 
universities. 

The TUC placed special emphasis on the 
need to provide more educational oppor- 
tunities for girls. At present about twice 
as many boys as girls enter full-time 
courses of higher education. 

"There is little justification for continuing 
to assume that the needs of boys for higher 
education will remain greater than those of 
girls," states the TUC. "It might well be in 
the national interest to attempt to modify 
any social or educational factors at present 
limiting the number of girls seeking such 
opportunities." 

Expansion of opportunities for the educa- 
tion of young people was also required in 
the national interest, stated the Trades 
Union Congress when referring to the sec- 
ond deficiency. Detailed evidence of this 
need would doubtless be given to the Com- 
mittee by various oragnizations more 
directly associated with the different fields 
of professional employment. 



Trade union interest and experience in 
national economic and industrial affairs, and 
public and social services, had convinced 
the TUC, "beyond all doubt," of the need to 
enlarge the opportunities for higher 
education. 

"Only a sustained general expansion of 
higher education can remedy existing short- 
ages and ensure that future progress in all 
the different fields of national endeavour is 
unhampered by a lack of suitably qualified 
personnel," the TUC report concludes. 

In an attempt to cope with the influx of 
secondary-school students resulting from the 
birth-rate "bulge" of the postwar period, the 
Government recently increased its contribu- 
tions to university building programs to 
£25 million for each of 1962 and 1963. At 
the same time the universities were told to 
go ahead with plans on the basis of £.30 
million in each of the years 1964 and 1965. 

The Government's aim is to provide for a 
university student population of about 
170,000 by the early 1970's, compared with 
100,000 during the academic year 1958-59, 
the Chancellor of the Exchequer has 
announced. 



New Issue of University Annual 
Devoted to Industrial Relations 

Eight articles on industrial relations will 
be contained in the next issue of The Com- 
merceman, annual publication of the School 
of Business of Queen's University. The maga- 
zine is due to come off the press early in 
March. 

The articles have been written by men of 
note. Titles and authors are: The Several 
Dimensions of Work, Prof. Frank E. Jones, 
Professor of Sociology, McMaster Univer- 
sity; The Role of Free Labour in a Chang- 
ing Society, Claude Jodoin, President, Cana- 
dian Labour Congress; Industrial Relations 
in the Decade Ahead, Ronald S. Ritchie, 
Executive Director, Royal Commission on 
Government Organization; The Impact of 
Automation, Dr. W. R. Dymond, Assistant 
Deputy Minister of Labour, Ottawa; The 
Impact of Labour Unions, Prof. H. D. 
Woods, McGill University; The Future of 
the Canadian Labour Movement, Wilfred 
List, labour reporter, Toronto Globe and 
Mail: The Need for Greater Co-operation 
between Labour and Management, Hon. 
James M. Macdonnell, M.P.; and The Role 
of the University in Industrial Relations, 
Dr. W. D. Wood, Director, Industrial Rela- 
tions Centre, Queen's University. 

Copies of the book may be obtained 
from: The Editor, The Commerceman, 
Queen's University, at $1 per copy. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



121 



CLC Committee to Investigate 
IWA's Dispute with Carpenters 

The Canadian Labour Congress has 
appointed a special committee to investi- 
gate the dispute over Newfoundland loggers 
between the International Woodworkers of 
America and the United Brotherhood of 
Carpenters and Joiners of America. 

The IWA has formally charged the 
Carpenters with raiding its jurisdiction. 

Claude Jodoin, CLC President, announced 
the formation of the committee last month. 
It will be composed of four CLC general 
vice presidents: Frank Hall, chairman; 
George Burt, William Jenoves and William 
Mahoney. 

Formation of this committee is the latest 
development affecting the union affiliation of 
Newfoundland loggers, which has been the 
subject of a series of disputes for about 
three years. 

Early in 1959, the provincial Government 
passed legislation, the Trade Union (Emer- 
gency Provisions) Act, to revoke the certif- 
ication of two IWA locals in Newfoundland 
(L.G. 1959, p. 360). This legislation fol- 
lowed the entry of the IWA into the New- 
foundland logging industry, and an ensuing 
strike at the Anglo-Newfoundland Develop- 
ment Co. Ltd., Grand Falls, Nfld. 

The CLC protested this action and 
formally petitioned the Governor-General- 
in-Council to disallow the legislation. No 
action was taken in the time permitted for 
disallowance. 

After passage of the Act, an independent 
union was formed — the Newfoundland 
Brotherhood of Woods Workers. At its first 
convention after its establishment the 
NBWW adopted a resolution authorizing its 
executive to "seek affiliation" with the 
Carpenters. 

In May 1960, the section of the New- 
foundland Labour Relations Act that re- 
quired the decertification of a union whose 
officers had been convicted of offences in 
connection with labour disputes was 
repealed. The amendment left the IWA 
free to organize and apply for certification if 
it could sign up sufficient members. 

In July 1961, after the Carpenters had 
begun a campaign to organize the New- 
foundland loggers, the CLC asked both the 
IWA and the Carpenters to agree to an 
impartially-conducted vote to determine 
the wishes of the loggers. Both unions were 
asked to give a prior commitment to accept 
the decision of the loggers. 

The IWA accepted; the Carpenters 
refused. 

At this point the IWA filed with the 
Congress a formal protest against the action 



being taken by the Carpenters. The forma- 
tion of the CLC investigating committee is 
part of the CLC's processing of this protest. 

In October the Newfoundland Brother- 
hood of Woods Workers disbanded after the 
Carpenters received a majority in the vot- 
ing conducted in August by the Carpenters. 

In September the province's two paper 
companies recognized the Carpenters as 
bargaining agent. 

Before the entry of the IWA and the 
formation of the NBWW, the loggers of 
Newfoundland were organized into four 
unions: The Newfoundland Lumbermen's 
Association, Newfoundland Labourers 
Union, Fishermen's Protective Union, and 
Workers Central Protective Union. 



European Economic Community 
Moves to Enforce Equal Pay 

The European Economic Community 
Council, meeting in Brussels in December, 
adopted a resolution that requires all mem- 
ber states to abolish, by either legislation or 
regulation or compulsory collective bargain- 
ing, all discrimination against women in 
setting their wages, so that the principle of 
equality in remuneration could be protected 
by courts. 

Wage equality is to be reached by three 
stages: Wage differentials in excess of 15 
per cent are to be reduced to 15 per cent 
prior to June 30, 1962; to 10 per cent prior 
to June 30, 1963; and completely abolished 
prior to December 31, 1964. 

EEC members will also refuse to treat as 
compulsory all collective agreements that 
would not ensure observance of this 
schedule, and seek to eliminate the follow- 
ing: 

— Application of obligatory minimum 
wages to men only, or at different levels for 
men and women. 

— Setting of different levels of minimum 
wages for men and women in collective bar- 
gaining or salary agreements and schedules. 

— Piece-work schedules with different 
remuneration bases for men and women. 

— Separate categories or classification 
criteria for men and women where salaries 
are subject to a system of occupational 
classification. 

— Maintenance in collective agreements 
of differences in remuneration based on sex. 

Systemic downgrading of women workers, 
different qualification standards for men and 
women, and evaluation of functions un- 
related to performance in classifying 
workers are also recognized as incompatible 
with the principle of equality. 

More Notes of Current Interest on page 242 



122 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



The Tritschler Report 



Report of Mr. Justice G. E. Tritschler, appointed a Commission under Manitoba 
Evidence Act to inquire into 1960 strike at Brandon Packers, has been released 
Publication was withheld lest it prove prejudicial to trial of firm's owners 



The report of Mr. Justice G. E. Trit- 
schler, who on June 29, 1960 was named 
a Commission under the Manitoba Evidence 
Act to inquire into the strike earlier that 
year at the plant of Brandon Packers Lim- 
ited, Brandon, Man., was released in Nov- 
ember. 

The Commission presented the report in 
February 1961 but publication was withheld 
lest its contents prove prejudicial to the 
trial of the two owners of the company, 
who, as a result of evidence brought to 
light during the inquiry, had been charged 
with conspiracy, theft and fraud. They were 
convicted in November and the report re- 
leased immediately afterwards. 

The Commission was directed by its 
terms of reference to assess the effect on 
the public interest of the strike by Local 
255 of the United Packinghouse Workers of 
America and to make recommendations on 
methods by which peaceful industrial rela- 
tions in Manitoba might be enhanced. 

The report contains the findings of a full 
inquiry into the negotiations between the 
parties and the actions taken by both in 
connection with the strike. 

Background of the Strike 

The Commission traced the history of 
the relations between the union and the 
company back to their beginning. 

Brandon Packers Limited, a Manitoba 
company incorporated in 1936, began as 
a custom slaughter-house with seven em- 
ployees. It grew into a packinghouse, meat 
processing and canning enterprise produc- 
ing a wide variety of goods; by 1959 it was 
employing about 200 persons. 

The company purchased livestock directly 
from producers, from the Brandon Co-op 
stockyards, and from stockyards in St. Boni- 
face and in Saskatchewan. About 90 per 
cent of its production was shipped to 
Winnipeg, Ontario and Quebec. At all levels 
it was in direct and constant competition 
with the "Big Three" (Canada Packers, 
Swift Canadian, and Burns & Co., Limited). 

Local 255, UPW, was organized in 1944 
and certified in that year as bargaining agent 
for the production and maintenance em- 
ployees of Brandon Packers. The inter- 
national union has nine districts, of which 
Canada is District 8. The District is divided 
into an eastern and western section, the 



dividing line being the Manitoba-Ontario 
border, and has a Director, who has an 
assistant in the western section. Each pro- 
vince in the District has a provincial rep- 
resentative. 

The first contract, made on December 21, 
1944, set the pattern of wages that pre- 
vailed for the next 12 years — the base rate 
for males paid by the Big Three at Win- 
nipeg less approximately 4i cents per hour. 
Employees were graded according to ex- 
perience, qualification and type of work, 
and each grade was worth some cents per 
hour (3 cents at the time of the last con- 
tract before the strike). 

In the 12-year period there was only one 
work stoppage, a short sympathy strike at 
the time of the Big Three strike in 1947. 

While the business grew, the plant and 
equipment became obsolete. Only part of 
the depreciation reserves were put back 
into fixed assets. At the same time com- 
petitors were modernizing and cutting pro- 
duction costs. 

In 1954, the first owner of the company, 
J. C. Donaldson of Brandon, who at the 
time of incorporation owned nearly all the 
capital stock, began trying to sell the 
business. In 1956 it was sold to Hugh 
Paton and Douglas Hubert Cox, both of 
Toronto, but Donaldson, who in the be- 
ginning had been president and general 
manager, continued as general manager. 

The new owners acquired the business by 
promoting a new $400,000 bond issue in 
months while they held an option, and 
using the money so raised to pay for the 
shares they had bought, with the result 
that they acquired the business without 
using their own money or credit, but the 
plant expansion that was the declared pur- 
pose of the bond issue did not take place. 

In August 1956, a two-year contract be- 
tween the company and Local 255 provided 
for the same increases in cents per hour as 
the Big Three Winnipeg contract entered 
into in the preceding April. The 4i-cent 
differential was retained. The years 1956 
and 1957 were lean years, a continuation of 
what the Commission termed a "skid to- 
wards bankruptcy." Before the contract 
(expired in 1958, Donaldson asked the 
negotiating committee to wait a while, as 
he would soon be replaced by a new 
manager. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



123 



Arthur Lloyd Wudel was appointed gen- 
eral manager in August 1958. He asked for 
and the union granted a one-year suspen- 
sion of negotiations to give him an oppor- 
tunity to get the company back on its feet. 
He was greatly aided in his efforts by the 
increase in the floor price of hogs under 
the federal Agricultural Stabilization Act 
and by the purchases by the federal Govern- 
ment of surplus pork in the period October 
1958 to January 1960. By the end of 1958 
the business was on the road to recovery. It 
was at this point, during the years 1959 and 
1960, that the owners, by charging to the 
company fictitious "management fees," ex- 
tracted $123,750, and by other manipula- 
tions further amounts which brought the 
total sums diverted to $214,110. 

In the spring of 1959, Local 255 asked 
the management to resume negotiations for 
a new agreement, negotiations having been 
suspended for one year at the request of 
the new manager. The wage differential 
between Brandon Packers and the Big Three 
at Winnipeg was now 181 cents. The 
company's position was that it could not 
afford to pay higher wages and remain in 
business. It was willing to consider certain 
fringe benefits and discuss a contributory 
pension plan. 

A conciliation officer was unable to bring 
about agreement and on August 28, 1959, 
the Minister of Labour established a con- 
ciliation board. The board having failed 
to achieve a settlement, the majority recom- 
mended an across-the-board increase of 2 
cents an hour, a half-cent increase in labour 
grade classifications, and certain additional 
fringe benefits. 

On February 4, 1960, the company agreed 
to implement the majority report. On 
February 16, Local 255 rejected the major- 
ity report by a strike vote. A final meeting 
was held between the company and union 
representatives on the afternoon of February 
24. 

The Commissioner found that evidence 
supported the company's assertion that at 
this meeting it offered not only to imple- 
ment the majority report but also to grant 
any wage increases which might be agreed 
to by the Big Three on April 1, 1960 and 
April 1, 1961. The union denied that this 
offer was made. 

At a meeting of Local 255 on February 
24, the union did not report such an offer 
to the membership. On February 25 the 
company, having learned that its additional 
offer had not been communicated to its 
employees, wrote all the members of Local 
255 putting the offer in formal terms. 



On February 28, the final pre-strike meet- 
ing of the Local was held. The Commis- 
sion found that "those present at the meet- 
ing were deliberately misled and confused 
about this letter by union officials deter- 
mined to implement the strike action." 
When the final decision was taken to go 
out on strike the following morning the 
members voting thought they were re- 
jecting an offer by the company to imple- 
ment only the majority report. The decision 
was taken by standing vote after inflam- 
matory speeches. The strike began on 
February 29. 

The picketing by the union of the struck 
plant involved taunts, threats, egg throw- 
ing, rock throwing, nail strewing, obstruc- 
tion of traffic and assaults. The President of 
the Local was convicted of assaulting a 
man whom he mistook for a strike breaker 
and was sentenced to nine months imprison- 
ment. Another union member was convicted 
of assault and another of obstructing a 
truck. The union paid costs of defence and 
fines. The union and other labour organiza- 
tion engaged in a Canada-wide campaign 
to boycott the company. 

The company continued to operate the 
plant, hiring replacements to whom it pro- 
mised continuing employment. On February 
29, the day the strike began, the company 
wrote each employee stating that since 
he did not turn up for work, his employ- 
ment was terminated. A further letter from 
the company on the same day advised each 
employee that automatic termination of life, 
sickness and accident insurance had resulted 
from the termination of his employment.* 

Mr. Justice Tritschler was appointed as 
a commission of inquiry on June 29, 1960. 
Following correspondence with solicitors for 
the company and the union and stalling by 
both sides, the Commission set August 29, 
1960 for the opening of its hearings. A 
few hours before that time the strike was 
settled. The Commission reached the con- 
clusion that the reasons for the settlement 
were that the owners were "panicked into 
a settlement in an attempt to prevent the 
disclosures which the opening of the Com- 
mission would make certain" and the inter- 
national union seized the opportunity for 
settlement because the strike had failed. 
The settlement granted an increase of 12 
cents an hour effective on the date of re- 
turn to work and with no retroactive fea- 
ture; an additional 6 cents per hour effective 



*Later the company applied to the Manitoba 
Labour Board for an order decertifying Local 255 
as the bargaining agent. The Board's order directing 
a vote was contested by both the company and the 
union. See Re Brandon Packers Limited (I960) at 
page 57 of the January 1961 Labour Gazette. 



124 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



August 1, 1961, and whatever increase is 
granted by the Big Three on April 1, 1962. 

The company and the union then sought 
to have the inquiry stopped. When the 
Government was not prepared to consider 
the matter settled, both parties engaged in 
various tactics to obstruct the work of the 
Commission, failing to provide information, 
failing to appear at hearings, and the like. 
The Commission found it necessary to use 
its full powers under the Manitoba Evidence 
Act to compel the filing of documents and 
the attendance of witnesses. The day after 
the last public hearing the Commission 
referred the whole of the proceedings to 
the Attorney General and the prosecution 
of Paton and Cox followed. 

Effect of Strike on Public Interest 

The commission emphasized the impor- 
tance of the company's operations in Bran- 
don and in the economy of Manitoba. It is 
the only packinghouse and one of the largest 
manufacturing concerns outside of the 
Greater Winnipeg area and thus contributes 
to the decentralization of industry through 
rural Manitoba essential to a well-balanced 
provincial economy. 

The withdrawal of capital funds by the 
owners in the period prior to the strike 
left "a gravely wounded industry." It 
would be idle to speculate, the report states, 
what might have been the wage-paying poten- 
tial of the company if the money im- 
properly withdrawn had been put into the 
plant. The Commission believed, however, 
that the evidence contradicted the union's 
claim that Brandon wage scales should be 
within 4£ cents of the Big Three's Winnipeg 
rates. This differential, which was estab- 
lished when the base rate was 50 cents, 
should have increased as the base rate 
trebled. The cost to the company of trans- 
porting 90 per cent of its production 130 
miles between Brandon and Winnipeg, the 
point at which it must sell competitively 
with the Big Three, and the fact that 
the Brandon plant is a one-division 
operation that is not comparable with fully 
integrated packinghouses with a number of 
divisions, were important factors. 

The strike, which the Commission thought 
was unjustified, was a costly affair. It cost 
the striking employees about $200,000 in 
lost wages. The international union spent 
about $47,000 and sympathizers donated 
$28,000, which was also spent. The com- 
pany's last pre-strike offer was at least as 
good as the final settlement, which came 
at the point when the strike had failed 
and only because the company hoped to 
forestall the inquiry. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 

53741-5—2 



A term of the final settlement provided 
that the parties agreed to request an in- 
dependent economist from the staff of the 
University of Manitoba to make an investi- 
gation into the factors that may or may not 
justify a wage differential in the meat pack- 
ing industry between plants situated at 
Brandon and at Winnipeg. This sort of 
inquiry, in the Commission's view, might 
well have preceded strike action. "To in- 
crease the pressure is not a good way to 
find out whether the patient can stand a 
higher pressure — unless the patient is ex- 
pendable, which the company is not, at least 
to the members of Local 255 and the 
people of Manitoba." 

Findings of the Commission 

In sections of the report dealing with 
the misbehaviour of the company and its 
owners, and the misbehaviour of the union, 
the Commission took strong exception to 
the attitudes and activities of both parties. 

The company put money raised for plant 
development to improper and unproductive 
use. Before the conciliation board, the com- 
pany pleaded inability to pay. In putting 
forward arguments in support of its posi- 
tion, it withheld essential information and 
deliberately misled the board. It tried to mis- 
lead the Commission in the same way. 

The Commission was critical of the union 
on a number of points. The Local did not, 
in the opinion of the Commission, obtain 
the kind of service it had a right to expect 
from the international. The union was com- 
pletely ignorant of company affairs and 
neither the union nor the union nominee 
on the conciliation board challenged the 
company's statement about its financial 
position. There were indications of indif- 
ference on the part of the union at higher 
than the local level to the survival of a 
small independent enterprise. 

Further, the professional staff of the 
union completely misjudged the chances of 
success of the strike. They did not assess 
management's ability to carry on or the 
availability of an alternative supply of 
labour or the reaction of public opinion. 

When being questioned before the con- 
ciliation board the union did not fully dis- 
close wage rate information for plants 
organized by the UPW in other parts of 
Canada, and, in its efforts to implement the 
policy that a worker should receive the 
same wage for a job no matter where he 
performs it in Canada, had deliberately 
misled the board as to the existence of 
differential rates between small and large 
companies and between different industrial 



125 



areas. During the strike, it deliberately mis- 
led the public about wage rates and other 
matters. 

The Commission found union officials at 
fault in precipitating strike action by with- 
holding from the membership the com- 
pany's last offer. 

The conduct of the strike itself was 
marked by acts of violence and discreditable 
behaviour, and the misconduct was con- 
doned and approved by union officials. 

The Commission also inquired into the 
Canada-wide campaign engaged in by the 
union and other labour organizations to 
boycott the company. It made a distinction 
between appeals for sympathetic boycott 
action based on truthful statements and 
boycott action forced on neutrals by picket- 
ing or threats of picketing and by threat of 
strike action which, if taken, would be 
contrary to law and in breach of provisions 
of existing collective agreements. As an 
example of the latter type of boycott, the 
Commission cited the refusal of members 
of other locals of the union to handle 
products diverted from Brandon Packers to 
Canada Packers plants because of the strike. 
As a typical example of unreasonable pres- 
sure uopn a neutral company, it cited the 
effort of several unions to have Safeway 
Stores cease handling Brandon Packers 
goods, and when the company refused, the 
picketing of Safeway Stores. 

Finally, the Commission was strongly 
critical of the union's attitude to the Com- 
mission, in that it joined with the company 
in trying to suppress the inquiry. 

Recommendations as to Changes in Legislation 

It is a signficant feature of the Report 
that the Commission does not look to 
changes in the law to correct all the abuses 
the inquiry uncovered. It finds the climate 
of labour-management relations poor: 
"Neither is inclined to see much good in 
the other or to recognize the evils in its 
own camp." It noted that no management 
Submission disclosed an awareness that 
management had shown itself in an un- 
favourable light at the inquiry. It expressed 
particular concern at the hostility of labour 
leaders to organized society outside the 
labour movement and at the "vicious im- 
age of government, the police and the courts 
as the enemies of the worker" that is 
created. The Commission's analysis of the 
attitude of government departments and 
the behaviour of the police in all phases of 
the strike did not bear out this image. 

One of the recommendations was a strong 
appeal for better public education on indus- 
trial relations. 



Nearly everyone is an employer or an 
employee and ought to have some under- 
standing of the problems of industrial rela- 
tions, but the Commission found evidence 
of ignorance, misinformation, misunder- 
standing and apathy. 

Industrial relations should be taught at 
the high school level, perhaps in the new 
non-matriculation general courses to reach 
people going into trades. At the university 
level, intensifiication and broadening of the 
course was recommended. Extension courses 
on a popular level should be available for 
those already working. Encouragement 
should be given to the establishment of 
labour-management institutes and seminars. 

To achieve these aims, it was suggested 
that the Department of Labour might en- 
list the assistance of an industrial relations 
advisory committee to plan and co-ordi- 
nate the teaching of the subject. 

Methods should also be sought to stimu- 
late general reading on labour-mangage- 
ment matters and the reading material on 
labour relations in many libraries in the 
province should be brought up to date. 

The main recommendations for changes 
in the law are set out below. 

Corporate Status for Employer and 
Employee Associations — The Commission 
recommended that all employer's organiza- 
tions or federations of such and all trade 
unions, whether international, national, 
provincial, local or federations of such, be 
made legal entities, at least for the purpose 
of prosecuting or being prosecuted for 
breach of any law and for the purpose of 
suing or being sued for any cause of action, 
and "it would be best that they should 
have corporate status for all purposes." 

Making unions legal entities was a step 
that would have to be taken if there was 
to be any improvement in the climate of 
industrial relations. This method must be 
tried before experimenting with many of 
the methods suggested by employer organi- 
zations, which the Commission thought 
were more likely to cause a breakdown of 
the collective bargaining system. In the 
Commission's view, 

This change in the law, which labour always 
resists, will prove a boon to the labour move- 
ment. It will conduce to more responsible 
behaviour and with that will come an 
immediate increase of public esteem and sup- 
port and of management respect. The need for 
responsible behaviour will cause a gradual 
weeding out of irresponsible leadership whose 
retention would jeopardize the financial posi- 
tions of unions. 

Justice was sometimes denied or impeded 
because trade unions have no legal status. 
Members wrongfully expelled from unions 
cannot get the union before the courts, and 






126 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



evidence submitted to the Commission 
showed that breaches of collective bargain- 
ing agreements are committed or threatened 
with "cynical indifference" because the 
union cannot be sued for breach of contract. 

In the Commission's view, unions are 
entities in fact and should be endowed with 
entity in law. 

Some believed that giving unions legal 
status would be of little value because 
unions often have small assets and it is 
often difficult to prove damages resulting 
from breaches of agreements. 

These difficulties could be partly over- 
come by amendments to the Labour Rela- 
tions Act. One should provide that a breach 
of a collective bargaining agreement by 
one party shall be actionable at the suit 
of the other party without proof of special 
damage. Another should state "that a trade 
union which defaults in obeying the judg- 
ment of any court shall not be competent 
to be certified or to remain certified as 
a bargaining agent." The Act should 
further provide that if a disqualified union 
is a member of a larger body, no other 
local of the larger organization may be 
certified as bargaining agent of the unit 
formerly represented by the disqualified 
union. 

Discharge of Strikers— The day the strike 
commenced, the company notified each 
striking employee that, because he had 
ignored an earlier warning to report for 
work on that day, his services were termi- 
ated with a resulting loss of rights to life, 
sickness and accident insurance. 

In the opinion of the Commission, this 
action was unnecessary, useless and provo- 
cative. Arguments for the legality of the 
dismissal on the ground of non-attendance 
at work the Commission characterized as 
"sterile." It was an empty gesture, for if 
a strike succeeds and the company gives 
in to the union terms, there must be rein- 
statement. 

Further, the dismissal contravened Sec- 
tion 2(2) of the Manitoba Labour Relations 
Act which provides: "No person shall cease 
to be an employee within the meaning of 
this Act by reason only of his ceasing to 
work as the result of a lockout or strike 
or by reason only of dismissal contrary to 
the Act." In the Commission's view, the 
section requires amendment but the spirit 
of it should not be destroyed. The principle 
that a man legally on strike has not given 
up his job, and that the employer hires a 
replacement at his peril, is recognized in the 
statutes of the majority of the provinces 
and in the federal laws of Canada and the 
United States. On the other hand, the 



present Manitoba provision preserving em- 
ployee status indefinitely was unreasonable. 
It is ridiculous that years after a strike has 
failed and the employer has been carrying on 
his business unhampered by the forgotten 
strike the present employees should be impeded 
in selecting a bargaining agent by considera- 
tion of the position of the former employees 
who have long since given up the battle. 

The Manitoba Branch of the Canadian 
Manufacturers' Association proposed that 
certification should be suspended upon strike 
action being taken and that certification 
should be automatically revoked when the 
employer entered into an agreement with 
another union or bargaining agent. The 
CMA also suggested that an employer be 
permitted to discharge a striking employee 
who refused to report for work upon re- 
quest. In its view, the Act should specify 
that where strike action has been taken 
after there has been compliance with the 
necesary requirements, "employers should 
be relieved of the obligations with respect 
to bargaining and be at liberty to alter the 
terms and conditions of employment." 

If these proposals were adopted, the Com- 
mission said, the employer would be able 
to convert strike action into the end of the 
union and the strike itself. They were an 
"unconscious indication of anti-union men- 
tality," an attempt to emasculate the strike 
weapon. Under the present system of col- 
lective bargaining, the strike or lockout is 
the fundamental means of conflict. To re- 
move the strike weapon or to weaken it 
so that it became ineffective would only 
hasten the introduction of compulsory arbit- 
ration, which is anathema to both labour 
and management. 

Mr. Justice Tritschler did not think that 
the voting rights of strikers should be pre- 
served indefinitely, nor did he believe in 
the instant terminations of voting status of 
strikers. He also objected to the suggestion 
that the right to vote be preserved for a 
fixed period, on the ground that a fully 
effective strike might be broken by mere 
passage of time. He thought, however, that 
the concept of maintaining employee status 
for a fixed period might be combined with 
the proposal to leave the whole question of 
certification and decertification to the Mani- 
toba Labour Board. After the fixed period, 
the Board would have the sole right to 
decide whether a certification should be 
revoked and a new bargaining agent 
certified. The Board should be given the 
power to take votes of either strikers or 
replacements or both whenever and in what 
manner it decides. It should be guided by 
the result of such votes only to the extent 
that it considers necessary. "The counting 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 

53741-5— 2J 



127 



of heads of strikers or replacements settles 
nothing. The crucial questions must be 
whether the strike is effective or whether a 
bona fide replacement staff is so reasonably 
assured of continued employment that its 
request for a bargaining agent should be 
considered." 

Union Security — Although union security 
was not an issue in the dispute, employers' 
organizations appearing before the Com- 
mission submitted that working people 
needed protection from compulsory union- 
ism or compulsory check-off. The Com- 
mission's conclusion was that until a move- 
ment for voluntary unionism begins to 
express itself otherwise than through 
employer organizations, it ought not to be 
taken too seriously. 

On the other hand, the Commission con- 
sidered that union security contributes to 
harmonious relations. 

When all belong or contribute, there is no 
resentment against those who get the benefit 
of the services of the bargaining agent but do 
not share the cost. Where new employees are 
required to join the union (or at least contrib- 
ute) the tensions and unrest of continuous 
campaigns for membership are avoided. 
Management is not under the temptation to 
discourage joining or to encourage defections 
from unions. Raiding and competition for the 
uncommitted by rival unions is less likely to 
occur. If the union in a plant is insecure, the 
collective bargaining position of the employees 
will be weaker. 

An individual may not prefer the bargain- 
ing agent who is the choice of the majority, 
but as only one bargaining agent is possible, 
there is no alternative to representation by 
the selection of the majority. All use the 
services, all benefit, all should contribute 
to payment. The suggestion that the neces- 
sary and chosen bargaining agent should be 
paid by voluntary donations by members 
of the collective bargaining unit, in the 
Commission's view, is not to be taken 
seriously. "Such a system would gravely 
weaken if not destroy the collective bargain- 
ing process." 

As to union shop agreements permitted 
by Section 6(2) of the Act, and approved 
by management, the Commission did not 
recommend any change in the present law. 

Accepting the necessity of union security, 
the Commission would attempt to deal with 
possible abuses within a union, particularly 
financial mismanagement and improper ex- 
pulsion or denial of admission to member- 
ship. 

To guard against financial mismanage- 
ment, the Act should be amended to require 
annual financial statements to be filed by 
unions with the Minister of Labour and to 



provide that any member shall be entitled, 
on application to the secretary or treasurer 
of the union, to a copy of such statements 
free of charge. 

That expulsion or denial of membership 
can in truth interfere with the "right to 
work" was illustrated in Manitoba by the 
Tunney case (L.G. 1957, p. 1214). Tunney, 
a milk driver, could only have appealed his 
expulsion from the local union by going to 
the meeting of the Teamsters General 
Executive Board at its Miami convention. 
Under the union constitution, until he had 
exhausted this remedy, he was debarred 
from seeking a remedy in court. The same 
type of provision appears in the UPW 
Constitution. "Any member who resorts to 
any agency or court outside the Interna- 
tional Union before exhausting all avenues 
of appeal within the organization shall be 
automatically expelled from membership in 
the union." This sort of requirement is 
general in union constitutions. 

The Act should be amended to provide 
that no labour union shall limit the right 
of a member to institute action against the 
union or its officers in any court or institute 
proceedings before any administrative body. 
Alternatively, the member might be re- 
quired to first exhaust reasonable hearing 
procedures within the organization but not 
outside of Canada and not to exceed a 
three-month lapse of time. Any provision 
of a union constitution or by-law incon- 
sistent with this provision should be without 
force or effect. The existence of the right 
of access to the courts would tend to ensure 
more expeditious and better conducted pro- 
ceedings. Further, "if the union shop is to 
continue, a workman denied admission to 
membership in a union should have an 
immediate right of appeal to the courts." 

Picketing — The Commission pointed out 
that the Criminal Code forbids picketing 
which is other than informative. The picket- 
ing carried on during the Brandon Packers 
strike was not purely informative and 
picketing frequently is not. Picket lines 
usually impede, delay or interfere with entry 
or access of places of business where persons 
have a legal right to go. Police and security 
guards not properly instructed tolerate these 
interferences with public rights. The Com- 
mission therefore recommended that steps 
should be taken to see that all law enforce- 
ment officers have a correct appreciation of 
the law. 

Informative picketing should not inter- 
fere with the rights of strangers to a dispute, 
and it should not be used for organizational 
purposes. The present Section 6, which 
prohibits intimidation or coercion to compel 



128 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



an employee to join a union, may make 
organizational picketing illegal, but, in the 
Commission's view, it should be spelled out 
that the decision to choose a bargaining 
agent should be left to the free choice of 
employees without pressure on an employer 
to make him coerce his employees into 
joining a particular or any union. 

Interference with neutrals, which the 
Commission considered unfair, would be 
avoided if picketing were restricted (as to 
place) to the struck employer's place of 
business; (as to time) to the period of a 
legal strike or lockout; (as to participants) 
to the members of the union on strike or 
anyone formally authorized by that union. 
Picketers should be required to carry written 
authorization from the striking union, and 
no one should be allowed to picket without 
such authority. If they are to be legally 
responsible for the illegal acts of picketers, 
unions should be protected against danger 
of liability for the illegal acts of unauthor- 
ized persons. 

It should further be made clear that 
refusal to cross picket lines is not per- 
mitted to employees bound by a collective 
agreement. This could be done through 
enlargement of the definition of "strike." 

The right of strikers to appeal for public 
support by publicity other than picketing 
should be preserved. The Act should permit 
appeals for support by boycott of the 
employer with whom the union has a 
primary dispute. 

Secret Strike Voting — The constitution of 
Local 255 provided that no strike could be 
called without approval by a majority of 
the votes in a secret ballot. The evidence 
showed that this requirement was ignored. 
The actual strike vote was not secret. Blank 
pieces of paper were supplied on which was 
written "yes" or "no", the papers being 
collected in a passed hat. There was no 
attempt at secrecy. Moreover, it was not 
this strike vote which sent the employees 
out on strike but a decision taken some days 
later on the evening before the strike. At 
this meeting there was an open vote follow- 
ing emotional speech making. The com- 
pany's last offer was not put to employees. 

The Commission recommended that there 
should be a secret strike vote taken by and 
under the supervision of the Department of 
Labour. The issues and the latest offer 
should be communicated by the supervising 
authority. Also, both sides were entitled to 
know the full result of the voting. The Com- 
mission did not agree with a suggestion 
made by unionists that management should 
be told only whether the result was for or 
against strike action and not be told how 
many were for and against. 



The Commission also recommended that 
provision be made for taking a secret 
supervised vote during the actual course of 
a strike if the Minister of Labour thought 
such a course might be beneficial. Such 
interference would rarely occur but the 
procedure should be available if special 
circumstances indicated the advisability of 
taking the opinion of the strikers on any 
question. 

Right of Employer to Communicate with 
Employees — During the dispute at Brandon 
Packers, the company kept the employees 
informed on the progress of negotiations. 
Union officials resented this and deliberately 
suppressed a company offer. The Commis- 
sion believed that the right of an employer 
to communicate with his employees should 
be spelled out in the legislation. This would 
correct presently current ideas that there 
was something underhand about the practice 
and would prevent union officials represent- 
ing an employer's communication as an un- 
fair labour practice. 

Manitoba Labour Board — One of the 

employee members of the Board took an 
active part in the dispute. He should not 
have sat on the Board when the applica- 
tion for the decertification of Local 255 was 
dealt with by the Board. He should have 
been replaced by an alternate member, or, 
if none was available, an employer's mem- 
ber could have retired with him. 

Conciliation Procedure — The Commission 
found that both sides deceived or withheld 
information from the conciliation board. 
It recommended that the Department of 
Labour intensify its efforts to inform parties 
to disputes and conciliation board members 
of the real purpose of conciliation. 

Further, it should be made a punishable 
offence wilfully to misinform a conciliation 
officer or a conciliation board. When a plea 
of inability to pay is raised, a conciliation 
board should have power to issue a "show 
the books" order and to put in its own 
accountants and investigators. 

If these recommendations were adopted, 
it would be necessary to revise or repeal 
Section 37 of the Act, which provides that 
neither a conciliation board report nor 
testimony or proceedings before a concilia- 
tion board are receivable in evidence in 
court. 

Enforcement Procedure — The Commission 
reached the conclusion that private prosecu- 
tion, as the sole method of enforcement 
of the provisions of the Labour Relations 
Act, should cease. There should be a public 
prosecutor, an official to supervise the Act, 
with the duty and power to initiate pro- 
ceedings where offences are committed. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



129 



The reasons advanced for this recom- 
mendation were that a law enacted by the 
Legislature for the public good should be 
enforced by public prosecutors. The law 
would be regarded with greater respect if 
an offence were regarded as an offence 
against the state rather than as an incident 
in a private dispute. In any case, the person 
aggrieved ought not to be put to the 
trouble and expense of conducting a pro- 
secution for the breach of a public statute. 
Private prosecution involves the further 
difficulty that one party may find himself 
in the position of having either to prosecute 



for an offence after his dispute with the 
other party has been settled, or stopping 
proceedings even though there has been a 
clear violation of the law. 

Conclusion — The Commission closed its 
report with a counsel of caution: "It is 
necessary to be alert to the danger that 
legislation induced by the stresses of an 
unpleasant strike may, while seeking in- 
dustrial peace, cripple good unions and 
damage the collective bargaining process." 
It went on to say that this counsel of caution 
should not lead to inaction. 



Canada and the Colombo Plan 

In 1962 Canada will again contribute $50 million to Colombo Plan, bringing 
total Canadian contributions since Plan's inception in 1960 to $382 million 



Canada will maintain its contribution to the 
Colombo Plan at $50 million for the com- 
ing year, Hon. David J. Walker, Minister 
of Public Works, announced at the annual 
meeting of Colombo Plan countries in 
Kuala Lumpur, Malaya. 

By approving this contribution for another 
year, the Government followed up its 1958 
decision to make this sum available annu- 
ally for three years, subject to Parliament's 
approval. Canada thus continues to partici- 
pate in the plan designed in 1950 as a 
co-operative venture in self-help and planned 
economic development for a group of Asian 
countries. 

Total Canadian contribution to the 
Colombo Plan, including the sum approved 
for 1961-62, has been $382 million. It was 
allocated as follows: 48 per cent for con- 
struction projects (chiefly power stations 
and transmission lines, industrial and agri- 
cultural equipment); 45 per cent for 
commodities (food, metal, woodpulp, fertil- 
izers); 3.4 per cent for technical assistance; 
and 3.6 per cent for aerial and other 
surveys, and for equipment for schools. 

In addition to its Colombo Plan contri- 
butions, Canada has so far made available 
to member countries loans and grants total- 
ling $70 million for the purchase of wheat 
and flour. 

One of the Plan's charter members, Can- 
ada belongs among the six "donor" countries 
outside the area. Technical assistance, grants 
of foodstuffs and commodities, and capital 
aid are its contributions to the less- 
developed member countries in South and 
Southeast Asia. 

The countries in the Colombo Plan area 
continue to require an ever larger number 



of scientists, technicians, engineers and 
persons with managerial and administrative 
skills and aptitudes, to assist them in de- 
veloping their natural resources, modern- 
izing and mechanizing their agriculture and 
industry, transportation and commerce, and 
training an effective government, business, 
and professional community. 

To help meet these needs, Canada's 
Colombo Plan Technical Assistance Pro- 
gram has continued to expand. Up to March 
1961, Canada had sent out 255 experts 
under the Technical Assistance Program. 
Of these, 34 are at present carrying out 
assignments in eight member countries in 
such fields as education, hydro-electric plant 
operation, aircraft maintenance, and ac- 
counting. In addition, more than 200 Cana- 
dian engineering and technical personnel 
have worked on contracts in association with 
capital aid projects in a number of member 
countries. 

In the same period, 1,564 fellows and 
scholars from 16 member countries had 
received training in Canada under the 
technical co-operation scheme. Their studies 
had covered various aspects of economic 
and social development, including agricul- 
ture, engineering, railways, road and bridge 
construction, health services, education, 
public administration, and others. Because 
French-language institutions are available in 
Canada, it is possible to offer fellowships 
and scholarships on an expanded scale to 
Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam. 

This compares with the over-all figures 
on training of experts under the Colombo 
Plan: 26,373 trainees from these countries 
have been trained in other countries in a 



130 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY J 962 



hundred skills, from engineering and print- 
ing to nursing and social services; 5,755 
experts have been sent out (or from one of 
the Southeast Asian nations to another) to 
give advice, set up schools, establish co- 
operatives, reorganize transport, and assist 
in dozens of similar activities. 

Between 1950 and 1961, more than 1,850 
training places have been provided by the 
countries in the region. During these years, 
the training capacity of the region has 
greatly increased, particularly at the higher, 
professional levels. The Colombo Plan re- 
port discussed at the annual meeting, how- 
ever, notes that training at the technician 
level has not been as concentrated as it 
was envisaged in 1950. The shortage of fully 
trained technicians is still acutely felt and 
the range of skills in which they are needed 
is very wide. 

Although the Technical Assistance Pro- 
gram requires years before its full benefit 
can be felt, the results of the capital aid 
program show quickly in the Colombo Plan 
countries. New power and irrigation dams, 
trawlers and fish processing plants, a nuclear 
reactor, training schools, cobalt bombs, 
diesel engines, workshops for farm ma- 
chinery, telecommunications systems and a 
cement plant belong among the Canadian 
contributions. 

Typical examples of projects financed by 
Canada are: detailed aerial mapping in 
Ceylon, needed for a survey of its resources; 
gift of textbooks to medical schools in the 
area; equipment to help Calcutta get a pure 
milk supply; equipment for technical schools 
in various countries; cobalt beam therapy 
unit for Burma; pest control laboratory for 
India; mobile veterinary service and clinic 



for Cambodia; aircraft and ground equip- 
ment for locust control in India; equipment 
for trucks and bus maintenance in Bombay; 
and books for a school of public admin- 
istration in Indonesia. 

In specifying the allocation of Canadian 
contributions, Canada has emphasized pro- 
jects with longer-range potentials for raising 
the standards of living of the people. 

A substantial part of the capital assistance 
extended by Canada in 1959-60 was taken 
in the form of industrial and agricultural 
commodities. 

The aid in the form of foodstuffs has 
proved to be of direct benefit in times of 
emergencies, such as droughts and floods, 
as it helped the affected countries to avoid 
using up resources urgently needed for basic 
economic development, to alleviate pressure 
on scarce foreign exchange resources, and 
to moderate the inflationary impact of grow- 
ing domestic consumer demand generated 
by increasing expenditures and rising 
incomes. 

Other commodities, such as base metals, 
railway ties, and fertilizers, have in part 
served the same purposes and, in addition, 
have helped to maintain employment in the 
developing countries, to keep their newly 
established capital facilities in production. 

Designing and building of capital projects 
such as hydro-electric plants and installa- 
tions represents a significant immediate ad- 
dition to the basic capital facilities now 
available in South and Southeast Asia. These 
projects will stimulate further economic 
development and provide a basis on which 
domestic and foreign private investment 
may be attracted. 



Canadian Maritime Union Affiliates with CLC 

The Canadian Labour Congress last month accepted the affiliation of the recently 
organized Canadian Maritime Union. Announcing the action by the CLC Executive 
Council, President Claude Jodoin said: 

"We are very pleased to have the Canadian Maritime Union as an affiliate of our 
Congress. We believe that this organization offers seamen the expectation of democratic 
trade union representation." 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



131 



Third Annual Convention of the 

Religion-Labour Council of Canada 

Delegates agree that industrial relations in Canada must be improved before we 
can hope to make our way of life attractive to world's newly emerging countries 



Industrial relations in Canada must be 
improved before we can hope to make our 
way of life attractive to people in the 
countries of the world that are newly enter- 
ing upon industrialization and independence, 
It was generally agreed by delegates to the 
3rd annual convention of the Religion- 
Labour Council of Canada, held in Ottawa 
on January 16. 

The Council was organized in 1960 with 
the object of bringing together representa- 
tives of the churches and the labour move- 
ment, and promoting the development of 
personal relationships and understandings. 

Victor Reuther, Director of International 
Affairs, United Automobile Workers, was 
the convention dinner speaker. 

About 100 delegates attended the meet- 
ing, of whom about 60 represented labour 
organizations and 40 represented religious 
bodies. 

At the morning session, which was under 
the chairmanship of Stanley Knowles, 
Executive Vice-President, Canadian Labour 
Congress, a panel discussion on the subject, 
"Canadian Industrial Relations and Religion 
— for Export?" was led by Charles H. 
Millard, at one time Canadian Director of 
the United Steelworkers in Canada, who 
recently retired as Director of Organization 
of the International Confederation of Free 
Trade Unions. Other members of the panel 
were Miss Mary Kehoe, Institute of Social 
Action, Ottawa; Rabbi Solomon Frank, 
Montreal; and Andrew Brewin, a lawyer 
and prominent Anglican layman of Toronto. 

After the panel discussion, the conference 
was divided into 12 small discussion groups. 
Later, spokesmen from a number of the 
groups gave reports of their groups' dis- 
cussions. 

C. H. Millard 

As material for the panel discussion, Mr. 
Millard delivered a paper citing an example 
of present-day industrial relations in one of 
the newly independent states of Africa, 
which, he said, he had chosen "because it is 
typical in too many of the lesser-developed 
states, and contains both good and bad ele- 
ments of great importance to all of us at 
home and abroad." 

In the case cited, the employees were 
represented by two unions, one an African 
union for the mineworkers and the other 
a union representing the predominantly 



white supervisory workers. When the 
African union went on strike for a dues 
checkoff, higher wages, and equal pay for 
equal work, the staff union, whose white 
members were being paid about 10 times as 
much as the Africans even when the work 
being done was similar, announced its 
adherence to its traditional position of 
maintaining "the rate for the job." 

This expression Mr. Millard described as 
"a fancy way of saying 'We want to keep 
the Africans out of the job.' " In reality, 
it was a way of maintaining the privileged 
position of the white employees. 

Then he went on to ask whether we in 
Canada, either from the union or from the 
religious point of view, were setting a proper 
example for these undeveloped countries; 
whether the impression of trade union and 
religious life in Canada that was being given 
to these countries was such as to make it 
attractive to them. 

Mr. Millard asked the panel to consider, 
among other things, whether from the 
moral standpoint union action could be 
confined to the function of collective bar- 
gaining, and whether industrial relations in 
Canada were likely to be helpful or harm- 
ful as an example for industrial and 
democratic development abroad. 

Panellists 

Rabbi Solomon Frank emphasized the 
importance of certain values, having belief 
in God as their source, that must be lived 
up to, taken into our lives and translated 
into values of living. Regarding these eternal 
principles, such as the equality of man and 
the belief that blacks as well as whites were 
made in the image of God, there could be 
no compromise. Loyalty to these values, he 
insisted, lies at the basis of human relations. 

Before we can improve our reputation 
abroad we must improve our behaviour at 
home; we cannot separate labour and 
religion, he said. 

Mr. Brewin urged that the emphasis 
should be on those principles in which we all 
profess to believe, and on translating them 
into action, rather than on leadership and 
on the utterance of noble sentiments. He 
thought that both religious bodies and 
unions were afTlicted by the temptation to 
allow themselves to become narrow, intro- 
verted and self-centred, with the result that 
they came to be mainly concerned with 
looking after their own interests. 



132 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



He asked what religious leaders were 
doing to present the newly independent 
countries with a favourable view of demo- 
cracy. Religious leaders were usually say- 
ing the right things about these matters, 
but there should be more emphasis on 
carrying out the principles they advocated. 

Miss Kehoe said that labour and the 
churches should concern themselves with 
such social problems as unemployment, 
which should not be left hopefully to mend 
themselves. She thought that organized 
labour had been carrying out its responsi- 
bility regarding unemployment by urging 
measures for dealing with it. 

With regard to the undeveloped countries, 
she suggested that in spite of our advantages 
we had something to learn from them. Our 
ways were not necessarily the best for them, 
and they should be allowed to shape their 
own destinies both in religious and in 
labour matters. 

Group Spokesmen 

Rt. Rev. E. S. Reed, Anglican Bishop of 
Ottawa, speaking for one of the discussion 
groups, said that his group thought there 
was a serious lack of communication 
between church and labour leaders. 
Some clergymen were inclined to look at 
the labour movement through the eyes of 
the public press instead of themselves be- 
coming involved in union activities. 

Referring to the common problem that 
church and union leaders have in getting 
their members out to meetings, he said there 
were today too many spectators, and too 
few who wanted to get involved. Bishop 
Reed sugegsted that what the Council was 
now doing on the national level should be 
translated to the local level. 

Speaking for another group, Stanley 
Little, President, National Union of Public 
Service Employees, said that labour had 
put forward a definite program on social 
questions, but the church had not. For in- 
stance, the church had taken no stand on 
unemployment or on the health program in 
Saskatchewan. 

Another group spokesman, Art Shultz, 
United Automobile Workers, said that for 
both the churches and the labour move- 
ment outside forces seemed to have taken 
over, and to be "reaching our people more 
than we do ourselves." 

Sam Goodman, Canadian organizer for 
the Butchers, said that some clergymen 
took the stand that they could do more for 
the common people if they did not identify 
themselves with any group. He instanced 
one clergyman who said that if he publicly 
identified himself with labour he would 
not be so well able to collect money from 
the well-to-do to help the poor. Was it 



Religious groups that are taking an active 
part in the Council include The Anglican 
Church of Canada, The United Church of 
Canada, The Presbyterian Church of 
Canada, Baptist Federation of Canada, 
Canadian Unitarian Churches, The Men- 
nonite Church, The Salvation Army in 
Canada, Student Christian Movement of 
Canada, and Canadian Jewish Congress. 

Representatives of the Canadian Catholic 
Conference, the Canadian Lutheran Council, 
and The Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada 
have attended national meetings as observers. 

Labour organizations participating in the 
work of the Council include: the Canadian 
Labour Congress, seven international unions, 
three national unions, three provincial 
federations, twenty labour councils, five 
joint councils, and sixty-six union locals. 



better to raise money or to stand on prin- 
ciple? He suggested that neutrality might 
result in refusing to do anything for any- 
one. 

Rev. D. A. Ellis, Anglican, Ottawa, said 
that in the parishes labour people did not 
speak up and make themselves known as 
labour people. Instead they left it to the 
clergy to speak for labour. His group had 
discussed the need for church and labour 
to take an interest in those not in the 
labour movement, e.g., the Eskimos. 

Alvin Hamilton, National Union of Public 
Employees, said the consensus of his group 
was that if we were to export our way of 
life to other countries we must also export 
our principles. They agreed that collective 
bargaining had to do with the whole life 
of man. 

Rev. M. A. Hughes, Anglican, Ottawa, 
agreed that church and labour were miles 
apart in communications. Labour said that 
the church was doing nothing about social 
questions, but things were said in church 
that were not heard by union men, maybe 
because they weren't there. Interdependence 
was good between unions in Canada, much 
less so between Canadian unions and those 
in the United States, and still less so as 
regards Canadian unions and those in other 
countries. 

William Heath, United Steelworkers, 
spoke of the contrast between the economic 
position of members of different unions, 
instancing the steelworkers and the textile 
workers unions. He asked how workers in 
prosperous industries could help those in 
the less profitable industries and in other 
countries. He thought that the CLC had not 
enough power to bring about co-ordination 
between affiliated unions. 

Murray Cotterill, United Steelworkers, 
agreed that the case discussed by the panel 
was a pretty good mirror of what some- 
times characterized employer-employee 
relationships in this country, although some 
progress had been made here in this regard. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



133 



A brief presented to the Religion-Labour 
Council by the Building and Construction 
Trades Council of Toronto spoke of its con- 
cern that members of its affiliated unions 
be employed in the work of constructing 
the numerous churches, synagogues and 
other buildings being erected by religious 
organizations. 

The brief suggested that "the church has 
the support and goodwill of all trade union 
members in the construction field, and 
therefore should reciprocate by instituting 
a policy of paying fair wages and complying 
with all other working conditions as is 
established in the community." 



It was foolish to criticize what happened 
in Africa when industrial relations in 
Canada were often conducted in an 
atmosphere of "fear-motivated protection- 
ism." 

Victor Reuther 

The present technical revolution is not 
merely a continuation of the old process 
of industrial change, and it has more serious 
implications, Victor Reuther told the con- 
vention in his address at the banquet. 

The older change consisted of the sub- 
stitution of mechanical power for manual 
effort, but the new revolution meant the 
substitution of mechanical judgment for 
human judgment, he said. 

He emphasized the need for preparation 
to deal with the impact of these changes and 
for advance notice by managament of plans 
for extensive technological change. Firms 
sometimes objected that this would mean 
giving away trade secrets, but, he said, 
there was no such danger; it was merely 
a matter of accepting social obligations. 

Severance pay, earlier retirement, and 
so on, were measures that only scratched 
the surface of the matter of displacement of 
manpower. Plans for retraining had in some 
cases proved disappointing. In the meat 
packing industry in the United States, where 
collective agreements had provided for 
retraining schemes, few had found jobs, 
after being trained, at the skill for which 
they had been trained. 



It was not enough to say that the exercise 
of initiative would enable the unemployed 
to fit themselves into new positions. No 
amount of initiative would find jobs for 
the hard core of unemployment in Canada 
and the United States, Mr. Reuther con- 
tended. 

Trade union sentiment in both countries 
was in favour of encouraging private enter- 
prise to provide jobs by expansion, but if 
private enterprise failed to co-operate it 
would have to expect that the public sector 
would expand to take up the slack. 

Recalling the "remarkable merging of 
religion and labour" in the early days of 
the trade union movement in Great Britain, 
by which the trade union movements of 
Canada and the United States had been 
greatly influenced, the speaker pointed to the 
deep roots of common interest between 
religion and labour. 

In later stages of development, however, 
organizations begin to concern themselves 
with the preservation of institutionalism. 
The Christian church's most glorious hour 
had been when it was opposed to prevail- 
ing institutions, and the most glorious hour 
of the trade union movement had been 
when it was crusading on behalf of its 
opinions and principles. 

The speaker regretted that the unions' 
preoccupation with institutionalism had 
drawn them away from their obligations to 
those outside the labour movement. He 
instanced the plight of migrant farm workers 
in the United States, largely deprived of 
opportunities for schooling for their chil- 
dren, of a sense of belonging to a com- 
munity, and of other advantages enjoyed 
by most people in that country. The trade 
union movement must be roused out of its 
commitments to institutionalism to deal with 
these things, he said. 

The shortage of material goods that 
hampered earlier generations no longer 
applied, and this has made it possible for 
us to think about being our brother's 
keeper, Mr. Reuther said. 



CLC Names Assistant Director of Public Relations 



The Canadian Labour Congress has 
announced the appointment of Laurent 
Chateauneuf, of East Templeton, Que., as 
assistant director of public relations. 

Born and educated in Quebec City, Mr. 
Chateauneuf is a former sportswriter of the 
French newspaper Le Soleil and news editor 



of radio station CKCV, Quebec City. He 
moved to Ottawa in 1951 to work for Le 
Droit and, later, for the federal Govern- 
ment's translation service, where he was 
Parliamentary translator at the time of this 
appointment. He also participated for some 
time on the French network equivalent of 
CBC's News Roundup. 



134 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



Sixth Annual Convention of the 

Quebec Federation of Labour (CLC) 

Adopts two statements ot principle, one rejecting separatism as the remedy for 
grievances of French Canadians, the other urging reform of educational system 
Reiterates confidence in labour unity, opposes stockpiling of nuclear weapons 



(Translation) 

The sixth annual convention of the 
Quebec Federation of Labour, held in 
Montreal from November 23 to 25, was 
highlighted by two statements of principles, 
one rejecting separatism as the remedy for 
the grievances of French Canadians, the 
other urging an important reform of the 
province's educational system. 

Nearly 500 delegates, slightly fewer than 
at the 1960 meeting, attended the conven- 
tion and unanimously re-elected Roger 
Provost as president for a sixth term. 

The convention dealt with about 180 most 
varied resolutions. 

In its statement of principles on separat- 
ism, the convention rejected this drastic 
step but insisted, however, on the necessity 
of reforming the Canadian constitution, 
especially in connection with the right to 
self-determination. 

The statement of principles on education 
sounded a warning that weaknesses of the 
present educational system were a con- 
tributing factor in unemployment and 
insisted on the need to place the control of 
education in the hands of parents. 

The delegates also reiterated their con- 
fidence in labour unity, expressed support 
of the New Democratic Party, rejected the 
stockpiling of nuclear warheads on Canadian 
soil, and called for public ownership of 
public services. 

In his address at the opening of the con- 
vention, Mr. Provost insisted on the need 
for economic planning and called for the 
establishment of a superior council to carry 
out this purpose. 

Donald MacDonald, Secretary-Treasurer 
of the Canadian Labour Congress, and T. C. 
Douglas, leader of the New Democratic 
Party, addressed the delegates. Other guest 
speakers were: Msgr. V. Belanger, Auxiliary 
Bishop of Montreal; Edmond Hamelin, pro- 
mayor of Montreal; and Leo Berube, Secre- 
tary of the Quebec Co-operation Council. 

Among other guests were: Rev. Gerard 
Dion, Director of the Department of 
Industrial Relations, Laval University; Wil- 
liam Dodge and Stanley Knowles, Executive 
Vice-Presidents of the CLC; and Thomas B. 
Ward, CLC Director of Federations and 
Councils. 



The convention was opened by Louis 
Laberge of the International Association of 
Machinists in his capacity as President of 
the Montreal Labour Council. 

President's Address 

Roger Provost, President of the QFL, 
called for the holding of a federal-provin- 
cial conference as soon as possible for the 
setting-up of a superior council for economic 
planning. 

Speaking at the opening session of the 
convention, Mr. Provost said that the first 
step toward full employment was the 
appointment of such a council at the top 
level, to which would be joined provincial 
and regional planning councils. 

Mr. Provost said that "planning must be 
done by top-level authorities who, if neces- 
sary, must resort to coercive measures." 

The QFL President emphasized that plan- 
ning must exist for man and man must have 
a part in it. "Man needs economic and social 
security in order to pursue his purposes as 
an intelligent and social being. He must 
first obtain economic security, which is 
based on full employment at a reasonable 
wage." 

Mr. Provost declared that in order to 
achieve full employment, immediate joint 
action at the two levels of government is 
essential. He accused the Ottawa and Quebec 
Governments of "passing the buck." 

We agree that in order to have full employ- 
ment, planning must be done through co-opera- 
tion of both governments. All efforts of the 
provincial authorities would be practically use- 
less without joint and concerted effort on the 
part of the federal Government. Why would 
this not be possible? In Europe, some sovereign 
states have come to an understanding on 
planning, with a view to attaining common 
objectives ... If this can be done [but isn't 
being done], there is ill-will or a lack of 
interest; if it cannot be done, then the only 
thing left for us to do is blow up Confedera- 
tion. 

Mr. Provost also insisted on the neces- 
sity for full social security. On this point he 
criticized the Premier of the province for 
refusing to co-operate with the Royal Com- 
mission on health established by the federal 
Government. 

"It is deplorable that the head of the 
Province of Quebec, following in this matter 
the example of his predecessor, has invoked 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



135 



the pretext of autonomy so as not to express 
the views of the people of this province to 
the Commission". 

The President made a clear statement 
of the interest of the labouring class in the 
province's educational system. "It has 
already been amply shown that education 
is directly related to employment, since it 
is those with the smallest stock of knowledge 
who are the most liable to find themselves 
without work," he said. 

It was the craftsman who was once in 
demand, but it is now the technician who is 
wanted, Mr. Provost said. He called for a 
reform at all school levels. 

Besides requesting that education be made 
available to all and in the same degree, the 
QFL President reiterated that parents must, 
as citizens, share in deciding on the struc- 
tures and the programs as well as in the 
rational development of the educational 
system. He also admitted as a principle 
that those citizens who are asking for non- 
denominational schools should not have a 
denominational training thrust upon their 
children. 

In closing, Mr. Provost recalled that "to 
obtain a program of full employment, social 
security and free education, the province 
must, in the first place, reclaim possession 
of its natural, hydro-electric and other 
resources in order that the State of Quebec 
may exercise a greater control over the 
economic development of the province in 
order to make it work for the common 
good." 

Donald MacDonald 

Full employment is Canada's greatest 
national problem, said Donald MacDonald, 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Canadian Labour 
Congress, at the opening session of the 
convention. 

Mr. MacDonald, representing CLC Pre- 
sident Claude Jodoin, said that the nation's 
current unemployment was a blight on the 
country's ability to properly administer 
itself. 

Stating that Canada has, through the 
medium of technology, the means to 
remedy this situation, he pointed out that 
the disgrace was even greater when 
illuminated by the fact that the problem 
has been solved in other countries, through 
democratic means. 

The Secretary-Treasurer of the CLC 
pointed out that Germany has not only 
solved the problem of unemployment but 
suffers from a shortage of hands to the 
point where it is now looking toward 
Canada for manpower. 



He called for the enactment of the one 
blueprint devised in Canada to solve the 
unemployment problem, that which is put 
forward by the CLC. 

Turning to internal problems, Mr. Mac- 
Donald stated that the CLC has lost in 
numerical strength during the year. He 
revealed that the membership of the CLC 
declined by 12,000, from 1,459,000 in 1960 
to 1,447,000 in 1961. 

The membership of the CLC declined 
from 33.1 per cent of the labour force in 
1956, at the time of the merger to 31.6 
per cent in 1960. During that time the 
labour force increased from 4,085,000 to 
4,578,000. 

Mr. MacDonald urged the QFL "to go 
out and utilize all its strength to bring the 
message of free trade-unionism and the 
benefits of collective bargaining to the 
workers outside the CLC. 

"We cannot correct the ills of this 
society by being a minority," he said. 

Mr. MacDonald also called for new 
tactics, new methods "to further unionize 
the labour force" and a shift from blue to 
white collar workers. 

Statement of Principles on Separatism 

The QFL acknowledged "the legitimate 
grievances of French Canadian workers," 
but proposed to fight for their redress 
"without resorting to the separatism as a 
solution." 

After a two-hour discussion in which 22 
speakers took part, only three being opposed 
to the resolution, the delegates adopted 
almost unanimously the statement of prin- 
ciples on separatism proposed by the 
Executive Committee. 

The statement specifies that the QFL 
intends to use every possible means to 
rehabilitate the provincial State of Quebec 
but still considers the Canadian Confedera- 
tion to be "the most auspicious setting for 
the full development of French Canada." 

The need was stressed, however, to "re- 
organize Confederation in its constitution 
and operation." 

The statement recalls that Canada is 
made up of two nations, that it is of a bi- 
cultural character. It states that the right to 
self-determination is a "universally recog- 
nized democratic right." 

On the other hand, the statement adds 
that provincial autonomy has often been 
used "as a smokescreen to hide the increas- 
ing transfer of the rights of the people of 
Quebec to foreign and native capitalists." 



136 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 




—Federal Photos, Montreal 
Quebec Federation of Labour Executive for 1962 — Officers elected at the Sixth Annual 
Convention were (left to right): Andre Thibodeau, Treasurer; John Purdie, Secretary; 
Roger Provost, President; and Jean Gerin-Lajoie and Edouard Larose, Vice-Presidents. 



The statement points out that "secession 
might bring about a decline in the living 
standard, which would seriously compromise 
the cultural advancement of French 
Canada." 

A great variety of arguments were sub- 
mitted in favour of national unity, includ- 
ing the need for a strong and united 
Canada in the face of the economic power 
of the United States; the protection of the 
interests of French Canadians living out- 
side the province; and the interests of 
workers as a factor of unity on the 
economic level. 

The delegates in favour of national unity 
also stressed the need to repatriate and 
amend the constitution of Canada; the need 
for more understanding on the part of 
English speaking Canadians; the possibility 
of peaceful co-existence of the two nations 
that make up Canada; and the need to 
settle certain grievances of French 
Canadians. 

The most vehement opposition to the 
statement of principles came from Mrs. 
Therese Dion of the Office Employees, who 
claimed that bilinguism was a dream. She 
urged the QFL not to sacrifice the full 
development of French Canada and to 
defend "the real interests" of French 
Canadians. 



At the end of the discussion, only nine 
delegates out of five hundred opposed 
adoption of the statement of principles. 

Statement of Principles on Education 

The statement of principles on educa- 
tion adopted by the convention constitutes 
a "cry of alarm over the dead-end our 
educational institutions have reached." 

Stating that the workers "also note that 
the striking weakness of the education given 
their children is one of the major factors 
in making them unemployed," the QFL 
demanded "speedy and thorough reforms 
aimed at placing control of education in 
the hands of the parents through the inter- 
mediary of those elected by the people." 

The statement of principles, which bears 
on the availability, the control and the fin- 
ancing of education, requests: 

— Equal rights for every child to all levels 
of education; 

— Free education at all levels; 

— Compulsory education up to the age of 
16; 

— Co-ordination by the Government of 
all components of the education system; 

— Complete reorganization of the prov- 
ince's Council of Public Education; 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



137 



— Reorganization of the Council into two 
committees, one French and one English, 
with denominational subcommittees; 

— Freedom to establish local non- 
denominational school boards; 

— Close control by a responsible Minister 
of public funds assigned to education; 

— Statutory, uniform and socially just 
levying of taxes for educational purposes; 

— Apportionment of monies collected for 
all regions on the basis of school age 
population. 

In commenting on this statement, Jean 
Gerin-Lajoie, a QFL vice-president, pro- 
tested that "the clergy takes it upon itself to 
represent the parents" on the Council of 
Public Education. 

"I claim the right to elect my representa- 
tives and to say how my money will be 
spent," he said. 

The chairman of the Committee on 
Education, Fernand Daoust, stressed the 
fact that the workers wish to have the 
present Council abolished as it is not 
democratic. "Moreover," he said, "we hold 
that it is responsible for the present bad 
state of education in Quebec." 

Mr. Daoust added that we must safeguard 
the freedom of education as well as the 
freedom of belief. 

Amendments to Constitution 

The convention adopted many amend- 
ments to the constitution, the most impor- 
tant of which originated in the increased 
political activity of the labour movement. 

The convention decided that the President 
and the Secretary of the QFL cannot be 
members of the Executive Committee of 
any political party. 

On the other hand, the section dealing 
with the aims of the Federation was 
amended to provide that, while protecting 
the independence of the labour movement 
from all political subjection, the Federation 
must "encourage local unions to urge their 
members to militate in favour of the New 
Democratic Party and to support it finan- 
cially by joining it singly or in groups." 

The suggestion that the convention of the 
QFL be made biennial instead of annual 
led to a rather lengthy debate which 
revealed that the members were widely 
divided on this issue. 

The Executive Committee was instructed 
to carry out, during the year, a thorough 
study of the problem based on a survey of 
the member unions and to submit a specific 
resolution on this matter next year. 

The seriousness of the problem lies in 
the fact that annual meetings of the con- 
vention are becoming very expensive, a 



fact that seems to be borne out by a 
decrease in the number of delegates, which 
was of 12 per cent this year in spite of a 
larger membership. 

Committee on Human Rights 

At the suggestion of its committee on 
human rights, the QFL was urged by the 
convention to request the provincial Govern- 
ment to enact legislation against racial 
discrimination and in favour of fair employ- 
ment practices. 

The convention also asked the federal 
Minister of Labour to appoint an advisory 
committee to supervise the enforcement of 
the Canada Fair Employment Practices Act 
as it relates to Quebec industries coming 
under federal jurisdiction. 

The committee also announced that an 
investigation into the Montreal housing 
situation revealed that owners of apartment 
houses were practising racial discrimination 
in 20 per cent of all cases. The report on 
this investigation will soon be made public. 

Resolutions 

The three-day convention was faced with 
some 180 resolutions. 

Political Action 

The question of political action and of 
the support given by the labour movement 
to the New Democratic Party was not 
debated. 

The convention did, however, adopt a 
resolution in which the QFL reiterated its 
support of the NDP, urged all member 
unions to join the NDP forthwith and 
recommended that individual members join 
the party. 

Labour Unity 

The delegates once more stated their 
belief in labour unity and their desire to 
put an end to the division in the Quebec 
Labour movement. A resolution instructed 
the Executive committee to "take all the 
possible and necessary steps" to achieve 
labour unity in the province. 

Natural Resources 

The natural resources of the province 
constitute a wealth belonging by right to the 
people, and one to be exploited to their 
advantage, declared a resolution that 
requested the provincial Government to 
increase the royalties paid by firms that 
exploit those natural resources and to 
implement a policy favourable to the 
processing of the province's natural 
resources "while taking into account the 
economic and social interests of all the 
people." 



138 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



Older Workers 

With a view to putting an end to dis- 
crimination against older workers, the 
Federation urged the federal Government 
not to award any contract to a firm that 
practices such discrimination, requested the 
provincial Government to enact legislation 
against all discrimination in employment by 
reason of age, and asked the owners of 
newspapers to refuse to publish any 
advertisement for employment when an age 
limit is mentioned. 

Nuclear Weapons 

The delegates went on record against 
stockpiling of nuclear weapons on Canadian 
soil. The adopted resolution held that to do 
this would implicate Canada in a war 
between the United States and the U.S.S.R., 
and expose it to total destruction. It urged 
also that Canada follow a foreign policy 
distinct from that of the United States. 

Quebec House 

One of the most debated resolutions, 
which was in the end rejected, dealt with 
the establishment of so-called Quebec 
Houses in various countries. Although 
favourable to the establishment of the 
Quebec General Delegation in Paris, 
the delegates were opposed to extension 
of this policy. 

Other Resolutions 

Among the other resolutions adopted, 
mostly without discussion, some requested: 

— Public ownership of the Quebec 
Hydro and other public services in the 
province; 

— Establishment of a complete health 
insurance plan as soon as possible; 

— Union representation on the boards of 
federations of charitable organizations; 

— An amendment to the criminal code to 
allow provinces to operate sweepstakes, the 
income from which would serve to finance 
social legislation; 

— Taking of the necessary steps to purify 
the streams of the province; 

— A study of the problem of air pollution; 

— Reverting to provincial income tax 
exemption levels of prior to February 1961, 
that is, $1,500 for single persons and $3,000 
for married persons; 

The teaching of trade unionism in schools 
and colleges; 

— Consolidation of social legislation; 



— Increase of old age and blind persons 
pensions; 

— Promotion of the tourist industry; 

— Legalization of the sale of apple cider; 

— Strict application of the provisions of 
the law dealing with the age of customers 
in taverns and other liquor outlets; 

— Establishment of a motor vehicle insur- 
ance plan similar to the one in force in 
Saskatchewan; 

— Adoption of equal wage for equal work 
legislation; 

— Increase of the minimum wage to $1.25 
an hour; 

— Appointment of a commission to study 
the problem of workers displaced by 
automation and technological changes; 

— Restoration of the right to strike to all 
workers, including the civil servants; and 

— Proclamation of a "Union Label Week" 
during the week in which Labour Day falls. 

Election of Officers 

Roger Provost, of the United Textile 
Workers of America, was unanimously 
re-elected for a sixth term as president of 
the QFL. 

The other members of the Board are as 
follows: Edouard Larose, International 
Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners, 
first general vice-president; Jean Gerin- 
Lajoie, United Steelworkers of America, 
second general vice-president; John Purdie, 
Tobacco Workers' International Union, 
secretary; and Andre Thibodeau, National 
Union of Public Service Employees, 
treasurer, in succession to Adrien Gagnier. 

The delegates also selected six industrial 
vice-presidents and nine district vice- 
presidents. 

Industrial vice-presidents: Fernand Daoust, 
manufacturing industries; Jean-Paul Menard, 
wood, paper and construction; Maurice 
SilcofT, textiles; Henri Desroches, transport 
and transport equipment; Roland Goedike, 
foodstuffs; and Gerard Poirier, mines and 
metallurgy. 

The following are the district vice- 
presidents: Rene Mondou, Andre Thibodeau 
and Aldo Caluori, Montreal; Robert Labrie, 
Northern Quebec; Benoit Laviolette, 
Gatineau and Laurentians; Jean Philip, 
South Shore and Eastern Townships; Oscar 
Longtin, Southern Quebec; J.-B. Hurens, 
Quebec; and J. -A. Hurens, St. Maurice. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



139 



Latest Labour Statistics 

(Latest available statistics at February 15, 1962) 



Principal Items 



Date 



Amount 



Percentage Change 
From 



Previous Previous 
Month Year 



Manpower 

Total civilian labour force (a) (000) 

Employed (000) 

Agriculture (000) 

Non-agriculture (000) 

Paid workers (000) 

At work 35 hours or more (000) 

At work less than 35 hours (000) 

Employed but not at work (000) 

Unemployed (000) 

Atlantic (000) 

Quebec (000) 

Ontario (000) 

Prairie (000) 

Pacific (000) 

Without work and seeking work (000) 

On temporary layoff up to 30 days (000) 

Industrial employment (1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing employment (1949 = 100) 

Immigration 

Destined to the labour force 

Strikes and Lockouts 

Strikes and lockouts 

No. of workers involved 

Duration in man days 

Earnings and Income 

Average weekly wages and salaries (ind. comp.) 

Average hourly earnings (mfg.) 

Average hours worked per week (mfg.) 

Average weekly wages (mfg.) 

Consumer price index (1949 = 100) 

Index numbers of weekly wages in 1949 dollars 

(1949 = 100) 

Total labour income $000, 000 

Industrial Production 

Total (average 1949 = 100) 

Manufacturing 

Durables 

Non-durables 



Jan. 13 
Jan. 13 
Jan. 13 
Jan. 13 
Jan. 13 

Jan. 13 
Jan. 13 
Jan. 13 

Jan. 13 
Jan. 13 
Jan. 13 
Jan. 13 
Jan. 13 
Jan. 13 

Jan. 13 
Jan. 13 

Novem. 
Novem. 

Year 1961 
Year 1961 



January 
January 
January 



Novem. 
Novem. 
Novem. 
Novem. 
January 

Novem. 
Novem. 



Decern. 
Decern. 
Decern. 
Decern. 



6,409 
5,864 
575 
5,289 
4,786 

5,039 
677 
148 

545 

84 
179 
149 

75 
58 

506 
39 

121.6 
111.0 

71,689 
34,809 



40 

9,174 

85,420 



$78.84 

$1.84 

41.1 

$75.66 
129.7 

139.7 
1,657 



174.1 
151.9 
147.3 
155.8 



1.3 
3.6 
4.0 
3.5 



- 2.6 

- 12.0 
+ 6.5 

+ 32.0 

+ 31.3 

+ 38.8 

+ 31.9 

+ 23.0 

+ 26.1 



29.7 



1.1 

1.0 



4.8 
58.4 
38.7 



0.2 
0.0 
0.3 
0.0 

0.1 

0.1 
1.4 



5.7 
7.2 
6.1 
7.9 



0.2 
2.8 
1.7 
3.3 

2.8 



N.A. 
N.A. 
N.A. 



21.4 
0.0 

28.1 

26.2 
7.4 

24.7 

19.7 
38.1 

1.6 
2.7 

31.2 
35.0 



+ 90.5 
+ 291.0 
+ 203.6 



3.2 
2.8 
1.2 
3.9 
0.4 



+ 9.1 

-f- 8.8 

+ 10.0 

+ 7.8 



(a) Distribution of these figures between male and female workers can be obtained from Labour 
Force, a monthly publication of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. See also page 275. 



140 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



Employment Review 



Employment and Unemployment, January 



Employment declined seasonally between 
December and January. But at the same 
time an unusually large number of workers 
withdrew from the labour market, so that 
the rise in unemployment was smaller than 
in comparable periods of recent years. 

The estimated labour force in January was 
only 13,000 higher than a year earlier. 
Employment was 161,000 higher and 
unemployment 148,000 lower than a year 
ago. 

Employment 

Employment decreased by 218,000 to 
5,864,000 between December and January. 
Seasonal declines in agriculture, forestry, 
construction and trade accounted for nearly 
three quarters of the decrease; manufactur- 
ing was responsible for most of the 
remainder. 

Of the estimated 5,864,000 employed, 
4,212,000 were men and 1,652,000 women. 
Corresponding figures for December were 
4,371,000 and 1,711,000. 

Employment in agriculture was estimated 
at 575,000 and in non-farm industries, at 
5,289,000. 

The increase in employment over the 
January 1961 estimate was 161,000, or 2.8 
per cent. In non-agricultural industries, the 
increase was 3.3 per cent; the major part 
of this gain was in the service and manu- 
facturing industries. Construction employ- 
ment in January was 4 per cent higher than 
a year earlier. 

The demand for male workers strength- 
ened noticeably over the year. In January 
the number of men engaged in non-farm 
employment was 3.8 per cent higher than in 
January 1961. 

Employment was higher than a year 
earlier in all regions*. Gains varied from a 
little over 1 per cent in the Atlantic region 
to almost 5 per cent in Quebec. 

The employment situation in Quebec has 
strengthened considerably during the past 
few months, particularly in manufacturing 
and the service industries. In other regions 
the improvement has been more gradual. 

Unemployment 

Between December and January un- 
employment continued to rise more slowly 
than usual. An estimated 545,000 were 
unemployed in January, 132,000 more than 
in December but 148,000 fewer than in 
January 1961. 

*See Table A-l, page 250. 



The current figure represents 8.5 per cent 
of the labour force compared with 10.8 per 
cent a year earlier. A month earlier the un- 
employment total was 6.4 per cent of the 
labour force. 

The unemployment rate was lower than 
last year in all regions. Quebec, Ontario, 
and British Columbia showed marked 
improvement. 

Almost all of the year-to-year decrease in 
unemployment was among men. Unemploy- 
ment rates were substantially lower than 
last year for men in all age groups. 

Some 476,000 of the unemployed in 
January were men. Of these, 132,000 were 
under 25 years of age, 204,000 were 25 to 
44, and 140,000 were 45 and over. About 
292,000, or 60 per cent, were married.* 

An estimated 69,000 women were unem- 
ployed in January. Of these, 35,000 were 
under 25 years of age, 20,000 were 25 to 44, 
and 14,000 were 45 or over. Some 26,000, 
or 38 per cent, were married. 

Of the 545,000 unemployed, 506,000 were 
without work and seeking work and 39,000 
were on temporary layoff. Of those without 
work and seeking work, 484,000 were seek- 
ing full-time work and 22,000 part-time 
work. 

Of the unemployed in January, 74 per 
cent had been unemployed for three months 
or less; 14 per cent were unemployed for 
four to six months; and 12 per cent were 
unemployed for longer than six months. All 
of the decrease in unemployment over the 
year was among those unemployed for six 
months or less.t 

Atlantic 

Employment in the Atlantic region 
declined by an estimated 42,000 between 
December and January. Almost all of the 
decrease was in seasonal industries. 

The construction industry, which was 
unusually active during early December, 
showed a marked drop in January. Forestry 
employment decreased seasonally as pulp- 
cutting operations were completed in many 
areas. There was the usual small employ- 
ment decline in trade as temporary workers 
hired for the Christmas season were 
released. Seasonal layoffs occurred in food 
processing plants but elsewhere in manu- 
facturing, employment was unchanged dur- 
ing the month. 

*See Table A-2, page 250. 
\See Table A-3, page 252. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



141 




6,300,000 
6,200,000 
6,100,000 
6,000,000 
5,900,000 
5,800,000 
5,700,000 
5,600,000 





5,600 


Emplc 
Non-f 


yed: 
: arm 






,ooo /*\ m0 .^ 










• 






\ 






«••• «» 



































1960 



1961 



1962 



Unemployment in January was 14.7 per 
cent of the labour force compared with 14.9 
per cent a year earlier. 

In January, employment was a little 
higher than a year earlier; increases in 
forestry, service and construction were 
partly offset by decreases in transportation 
and trade. Manufacturing employment 
showed little year-to-year change, although 
individual industries showed a mixture of 
gains and losses. The shipbuilding industry 
experienced a marked improvement. On the 
other hand, the iron and steel industries 
operated at substantially lower levels than 
the year before. 

In the week ended January 13, the 
Atlantic labour force was estimated at 
571,000, down from 593,000 in December 
but slightly higher than in January 1961. 
Employment was estimated at 487,000 and 
unemployment at 84,000. 

Quebec 

Employment in the Quebec region 
declined by 62,000 between December and 
January. Forestry employment dropped as 
pulp cutting was completed in most areas. 
Employment in construction and trade also 
showed a seasonal decline. 



Activity in the service industry and certain 
parts of manufacturing continued to 
strengthen. The primary textile and leather 
goods industries in particular, which usually 
decline at this time of year, continued 
operating at high levels. 

A small layoff occurred in the aircraft 
industry, but employment in shipbuilding 
was maintained at a higher level than last 
year. A backlog of orders kept the Montreal 
shipyards particularly busy. 

Unemployment in January was 10.0 per 
cent of the labour force compared with 
13.9 per cent a year earlier. 

Employment rose by 72,000 over January 
1961; service and manufacturing industries 
accounted for most of the increase. 

The improvement in manufacturing was 
fairly widespread, involving consumer dur- 
ables and non-durables and, to a lesser 
extent, the capital goods industries. Primary 
textiles, leather goods, certain iron and 
steel products, and shipbuilding continued to 
show marked year-to-year increases. All 
service-producing industries, with the excep- 
tion of trade, improved their positions over 
the year. 

Forestry employment continued at a 
lower level than the year before, and con- 
struction employment showed little change 
from a year earlier. 

In the week ended January 13, the Quebec 
labour force was estimated at 1,795,000; 
this was little changed from the estimates a 
month and a year earlier. 

Employment was estimated at 1,616,000, 
down 62,000 from December but up 72,000 
from the year-earlier estimate. 

Unemployment was estimated at 179,000, 
which figure was 50,000 higher than 
December's but 70,000 lower than that of 
January 1961. 

Ontario 

Employment in Ontario decreased by an 
estimated 62,000 between December and 
January, mainly as a result of declines in 
construction, trade and manufacturing. 
Relatively stable employment was main- 
tained in other industries. 

Most of the layoffs in manufacturing were 
seasonal and of short duration. Employ- 
ment continued to expand in a number of 
industries, particularly in the production of 
primary metals, basic materials and most 
consumer goods. 

Unemployment in January was 6.3 per 
cent of the labour force, compared with 8.5 
per cent a year earlier. 

Employment in non-farm industries was 
51,000 higher than a year earlier; farm 
employment declined by 10,000. Most of the 
gain in non-farm employment was distrib- 
uted among manufacturing, trade, and 



142 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



service; in mining and transport, employ- 
ment declined. Construction employment 
was about the same as a year earlier, 
although a considerably larger number of 
projects were underway in both residential 
and non-residential construction. 

In the week ended January 13, the 
Ontario labour force was estimated at 
2,360,000, employment at 2,211,000 and 
unemployment at 149,000. The unemploy- 
ment estimate was 36,000 higher than in 
December but 53,000 lower than in 
January 1961. 

Prairie 

Employment in the Prairie region 
decreased by 37,000 between December and 
January, an average decline for this time 
of the year. 

Stockyards and packing plants remained 
very active but steel fabricating and sheet- 
metal shops and building paper plants con- 
tinued operating at relatively low levels. 

The construction industry remained fairly 
active, and mining employment increased. 
Employment in trade and service declined 
seasonally. 

Unemployment in January was 6.8 per 
cent of the labour force, compared with 7.5 
per cent a year earlier. 

Employment in January was higher than 
a year earlier. Most of the 26,000 increase 
took place in construction, trade and manu- 
facturing. Residential and industrial con- 
struction showed the most marked improve- 
ment over the year. Employment in mining 
was up over last year as a result of an 
increase in metal mining. 

In the week ended January 13, the 
Prairie labour force was estimated at 
1,106,000, employment at 1,031,000 and 
unemployment at 75,000. The unemploy- 
ment figure was 14,000 higher than in 
December but 6,000 lower than in January 
1961. 

Pacific 

Employment in the Pacific region declined 
seasonally between December and January. 



The decline occurred mainly in forestry and 
trade, and, to a lesser extent, in manu- 
facturing. 

The demand for lumber continued strong 
but heavy snowfalls and cold weather cur- 
tailed logging operations in some areas, 
resulting in a decrease in forestry employ- 
ment. Saw and planing mills generally 
maintained a high level of activity, al- 
though a few mills had to close because of 
heavy snowfall. 

There was some evidence of employment 
strengthening in the iron and steel products 
industry, particularly in machine shops. Out- 
put of non-ferrous metal products continued 
at about the same level as during the 
previous month. 

Adverse weather conditions resulted in a 
further small decline in construction 
employment. 

Unemployment in January was 10.1 per 
cent of the labour force compared with 13.3 
per cent a year earlier. 

Employment increased by 16,000 over the 
year; the service-producing industries 
accounted for most of the advance. 

Continuing strong demands for forestry 
products, both for export and domestic use, 
resulted in a considerable increase in 
forestry employment also. Manufacturing 
employment was about the same as a year 
earlier, although job opportunities were 
more plentiful in several industries, 
especially in shipbuilding. 

Shipments of lumber and wheat to Asia 
continued to keep employment in transporta- 
tion at a higher level than the previous year. 

In the week ended January 13, the labour 
force was estimated at 577,000, little 
changed from a month and a year earlier. 
Employment was estimated at 519,000, 
down 15,000 from December but up 16,000 
from January 1961. Unemployment, at 
58,000, was up 12,000 from December but 
down 19,000 from January 1961. 

— Prepared by D.B.S. and 
Department of Labour. 



LABOUR MARKET CONDITIONS 





Labour Surplus 


Approximate Balance 


Labour Market Areas 


1 


2 


3 




January 
1962 


January 
1961 


January 
1962 


January 
1961 


January 
1962 


January 
1961 


Metropolitan 


8 
15 

6 
36 


11 
21 
11 
49 


4 
11 

8 
21 


1 
5 

3 

8 


















Minor 


1 


1 






Total 


65 


92 


44 


17 


1 


1 







THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



143 



CLASSIFICATION OF LABOUR MARKET AREAS-JANUARY 1962 





SUBSTANTIAL 




MODERATE 


APPROXIMATE 


LABOUR 





LABOUR SURPLUS 


LABOUR SURPLUS 


BALANCE 


SHORTAGE 




Group 1 


Group 2 


Group 3 


Group 4 




Calgary 




Halifax 








EDMONTON 


«— 


Montreal 








Hamilton 




Ottawa-Hull 






METROPOLITAN AREAS 


Quebec-Levis 




Toronto 






(labour force 75,000 or more) 


St. John's 
Vancouver-New 
Westminster 
Windsor 
Winnipeg 












Brantford 




Guelph 








Corner Brook 




Kingston 








Cornwall 




Kitchener 








Fort William-Port Arthur 


LONDON -< — 








Farnham-Granby 




Oshawa 






MAJOR INDUSTRIAL AREAS 
(labour force 25.000-75,000; 60 


Joliette 
Lac St. Jean 
Moncton 




Rouyn-Val d'Or 
Saint John 
Sarnia 






per cent or more in non- 


New Glasgow 




Sudbury 






agricultural activity) 


Niagara Peninsula 




—. . J 
1 immins- 








PETERBOROUGH 


^ 


Kirkland Lake 








Shawinigan 




Victoria 








Sherbrooke 












Sydney 
Trois Rivieres 






















Charlottetown 




Barrie 








Lethbridge 




Brandon 






MAJOR AGRICULTURAL 


Prince Albert 




Chatham 






AREAS 


Riviere du Loup 




Moose Jaw 






(labour force 25.000-75,000; 40 
per cent or more in agriculture) 


Thetford-Lac Megantic- 

St. Georges 
Yorkton 




North Battleford 
Red Deer 
Regina 
Saskatoon 


















Bathurst 




Belleville-Trenton 


Kitimat 






BEAUHARNOIS 


•4 


Brampton 








Bracebridge 




CENTRAL VANCOU- 








Bridgewater 




— >-VER ISLAND 








Campbellton 




Dawson Creek 








Chilliwack 




Drumheller 








CRANBROOK 


-^ 


Drummondville 








Dauphin 




Fredericton 








Edmundston 




Gait 








Gaspe 




Goderich 








Grand Falls 




Lachute-Ste Therese 








KAMLOOPS 


-^ 


Listowel 








KENTVILLE 


■^ 


North Bay 








LINDSAY 


-^ 


St. Hyacinthe 








MEDICINE HAT 


•^ 


St. Jean 








Montmagny 




St. Thomas 








Newcastle 




Simcoe 








Okanagan Valley 
OWEN SOUND 




STRATFORD «< — 






MINOR AREAS 


■^ 


Swift Current 






(labour force 10,000 to 25,000) 


PEMBROKE 
Portage la Prairie 
PRINCE GEORGE- 


^~ 


Walkerton 

Weyburn 

WOODSTOCK- 








QUESNEL 


■^ 


TILLSONBURG «< — 








Prince Rupert 












Quebec North Shore 












Rimouski 












Ste Agathe-St. Jerome 












St. Stephen 












SAULT STE MARIE 


•^ 










Sorel 












Summerside 












TRAIL-NELSON 


<— 










Truro 












Valleyfield 












Victoriaville 












Woodstock. N.B. 












Yarmouth 











>-The areas shown in capital letters are those that have been reclassified during the month; an arrow indicates the group from which they 

moved. For an explanation of the classification used, see page 275. 



144 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



Collective Bargaining Review 



Economics and Research Branch 



Collective Bargaining in January 



During January, negotiations between the 
United Auto Workers and Ford Motor 
Company of Canada produced a three-year 
agreement embodying terms similar to those 
of the General Motors settlement reached in 
December. The new Ford agreement, rati- 
fied by the union membership after a brief 
strike, covers approximately 7,500 em- 
ployees at plants in Windsor, Oakville, 
North York and Crowland. 

The parties agreed to a basic minimum 
increase of 18 cents an hour over the three- 
year period based on the annual improve- 
ment factor formula (yearly increases of 6 
cents an hour or 2\ per cent, whichever is 
greater), continuation of the cost-of-living 
allowance formula (1-cent-an-hour increase 
for each 0.6-point change in the consumer 
price index), an increase in shift premiums, 
and the upgrading of certain job classifica- 
tions. 

The new contract provides for increases 
in basic pensions, S.U.B. and group life 
insurance. The company also agreed to 
assume 50 per cent of the cost of hospital 
and medical coverage for pensioners. In 
addition, higher separation pay was granted 
and the qualifying period for full vacation 
pay was reduced. Supplementary pensions, 
jury duty pay and a relocation allowance 
plan were new features in the agreement. 

Negotiations continued between the United 
Auto Workers and Chrysler, and between 
the union and Massey-Ferguson, where 
negotiations had been in progress since 
the fall. In both disputes a conciliation 
board met briefly with the parties but 
decided that its efforts would not be helpful. 
A strike deadline at Chrysler was then set 
for February 16, and at Massey-Ferguson 
for February 2. 

In the steel industry, separate three-year 
agreements were signed by the Steelworkers 
and the various Steel Company of Canada 
plants in Ontario and Quebec. The settle- 
ments provided for an initial wage increase 
of 4* cents an hour and a further increase of 
5 cents an hour in 1963, and raised the 
increment between job classes from 6 cents 
to 6J cents. 

Improved fringe benefits formed a major 
part of the Stelco settlements. The pen- 
sion formula was amended to provide for 
$3.15 (formerly $3) a month per year of 
service and the compulsory retirement age is 
to be reduced progressively from 70 to 68. 
Group life insurance was increased from 
$3,500 to $5,000, and provision was made 



for paid-up insurance of $1,500 (formerly 
$1,250) for employees on retirement. 

Furthermore, it was agreed that the P.S.I. 
Blue Plan would be adopted for employees 
and all pensioners, with major medical 
insurance coverage for all employees. Com- 
parable medical coverage is to be granted 
to employees in Quebec, where P.S.I, plans 
are not available. The weekly indemnity 
for accident or sickness was increased from 
$35 to $50. 

Under the previous agreement, employees 
with 3 to 14 years of service had been 
entitled to two weeks vacation; now em- 
ployees with 11 to 14 years of service will 
receive one additional day of vacation for 
each year of service after 11 years up to a 
maximum of four extra days for employees 
with 14 years of service. 

During the month, a seven-week strike 
in the Ontario car-carrying industry was 
brought to an end when the Teamsters and 
the Motor Transport Industrial Relations 
Bureau concluded a three-year agreement 
that increased basic wages by 6 cents an 
hour for each year of the agreement; for 
skilled mechanics, wage increases of 7 cents 
an hour per year were negotiated. 

A jointly-administered, company-financed 
welfare plan was set up to replace the 
Ontario Teamsters' Welfare Fund; this had 
been a key issue during negotiations. The 
companies agreed to contribute $16 a 
month per employee to the new fund in 
place of the $8 they had been contributing 
to the union-administered Ontario Team- 
sters' Welfare Fund. 

In addition, a jointly-administered pension 
fund was established, to which the com- 
panies and employees will make equal con- 
tributions. The fund is to be administered 
by three company representatives, three 
union representatives and a chairman from 
a trust company. 

In British Columbia, the Teamsters con- 
cluded a three-year agreement with the 
Motor Transport Labour Relations Council, 

providing about 1,250 employees with a 
wage increase of 7 cents an hour from 
April 1962 and a further 8 cents from 
January 1963; the employees in turn are to 
contribute 7 cents an hour of their wage 
increase to a pension plan. 

Within two weeks after opening negotia- 
tions, the Fire Fighters and the City of 
Toronto reached a two-year agreement 
affecting 1,195 fire fighters that provided 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



145 



for wage increases of 3h per cent effective 
April 1, 1962, and a further 3 per cent 
effective April 1, 1963. 

Major Settlements in 1961 

During 1961, negotiations for new col- 
lective agreements affecting bargaining units 
of 500 or more employees led to 214 
major settlements, covering approximately 
465,000 workers. As in previous years, about 
80 per cent of these agreements were for 
periods of two years or less. 

In 1961, one-year agreements amounted 
to 40 per cent of the collective agreements 
negotiated. Of this group, slightly more than 
one quarter granted wage increases in the 
range of 0.1 to 4.9 cents an hour, and 
nearly half provided for increases in the 
range of 5 to 9.9 cents an hour. 

Two-year agreements made up 38 per cent 
of the major settlements signed during the 
year. More than one third of these agree- 
ments provided for wage increases in the 5 
to 9.9 cents an hour range, and almost an 
equal proportion granted increases of 10 to 
14.9 cents an hour over the life of the agree- 
ments. 

The year's negotiations produced 35 major 
agreements of three years' duration; these 
constituted less than 10 per cent of all 
settlements. Wage increases of between 15 
and 19.9 cents an hour were the most 
frequent in the three-year agreements. 

Nearly 50 per cent of the major collective 
agreements signed in 1961, covering some 
154,000 employees, were in manufacturing. 
As in 1960, the major agreements in the 
paper products industry were the largest 
single group of agreements signed in the 
manufacturing sector: a total of 27 agree- 
ments covering approximately 43,000 
workers. Of these, 21 were for a period of 
one year, and four were for a term of two 
years. 

In the transportation equipment industry, 
15 major agreements covering approxi- 
mately 28,000 workers were negotiated in 
1961. Over half of the workers affected were 
employees at seven General Motors plants, 
where a three-year contract was signed. 
The shipbuilding industry concluded 10 



agreements covering nearly 9,000 workers; 
most of these settlements were of two years 
duration. 

In the electrical products industry, 11 
agreements covering approximately 21,000 
employees were signed; in this group, 
Northern Electric signed three one-year 
agreements and Canadian General Electric, 
four three-year contracts. In iron and steel 
manufacturing, 12 agreements covering 
approximately 15,000 workers were nego- 
tiated; the largest bargaining unit involved 
was the 6,000 workers at Algoma Steel, 
where a three-year agreement was con- 
cluded. In the aluminum industry, five agree- 
ments were signed, four of which covered 
approximately 8,600 employees of the 
Aluminum Company of Canada. In the rub- 
ber industry, nine agreements affecting some 
9,000 workers were concluded during the 
year. 

The services sector ranked second to 
manufacturing in the number of major col- 
lective agreements negotiated. In 1961, the 
79 settlements in this sector amounted to 
37 per cent of the total major agreements 
and covered approximately 246,000 
workers. Municipalities were parties to 20 
such agreements, more than half of them 
being of two-year duration and the rest hav- 
ing a term of one year. In various hospitals 
across Canada, the wages of 13,000 non- 
professional employees were increased in 
11 settlements; most of these were for 
terms of one to two years. In the retail 
trade sector, there were eight agreements 
covering more than 10,000 workers, who are 
employed mainly by food distributors. 

In the transportation industry, 15 collec- 
tive agreements were signed. They affected 
approximately 138,000 workers, of whom 
the non-operating railway employees, num- 
bering 110,000, formed the majority. 
Municipal transportation systems in Toronto 
and Winnipeg concluded collective agree- 
ments of two years' duration, and the 
Montreal Transportation Commission signed 
a three-year contract during the year. 

Tables on page 276 show the wage settle- 
ments in agreements signed during the 
second half of 1961 and during the 
entire year. 



Collective Bargaining Scene 

Agreements covering 500 or more employees, 
excluding those in the construction industry 

PART I— Agreements Expiring During February, March and April 

(Except those under negotiation in January) 

Company and Location Union 

Abitibi Power & Paper & subsids., Que., Ont. 

& Man Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 
Acme, Borden's & other dairies, Toronto, Ont. ... Teamsters (Ind.) 



146 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



Company and Location Union 

Alta. Govt. Telephones I.B.E.W., (AFL-CIO/CLC) (traffic empl.) 

Aluminum Co., Kingston, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Assn. des Marchands Detaillants, (Produits 

Alimentaires), Quebec, Que Commerce Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

B.C. Hotels Assn., Vancouver, B.C Hotel Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

B.C. Telephone & subsidiaries B.C. Telephone Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Burns & Co. (Eastern), Kitchener, Ont Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Can. Iron Foundries, Three Rivers, Que Moulders (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Canada Packers (8 plants), Canada-wide Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Collingwood Shipyards, Collingwood, Ont CLC-chartered local 

Dom. Engineering Works, Lachine, Que Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dunlop Canada, Toronto, Ont Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

DuPont of Canada, Kingston, Ont Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

East. Can. Newsprint Grp., Que. & N.S Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 
E. B. Eddy, Hull, Que Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

Electric Auto-Lite, Sarnia, Ont Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Electro Metallurgical, Welland, Ont U. E. (Ind.) 

Fisheries Assn., B.C United Fishermen (Ind.) (tendermen) 

Fisheries Assn. & Cold Storage Cos., B.C United Fishermen (Ind.) & Native Brotherhood 

(Ind.) (shore wkrs.) 

Falconbridge Nickel, Falconbridge, Ont Mine, Mill and Smelter Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Food stores, (various), Vancouver, Victoria, & 

New Westminster, B.C Retail Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Fur Mfrs. Guild, Montreal, Que Butcher Workmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Great Lakes Paper, Fort William, Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 
Hotel Chateau Frontenac, (CPR), Quebec, Que. Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC) 

Hotel Empress, (CPR), Victoria, B.C Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC) 

John Inglis, Toronto, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

International Harvester, Hamilton, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Kimberley-Clark Paper, Terrace Bay, Ont Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC), 

I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
K.V.P. Company, Espanola, Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC) Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & I.B.E.W. 

AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Manitoba Hydro I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Marathon Corp., Marathon, Ont Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Montreal General Hospital, Montreal, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Ont.-Minnesota Paper, Fort Frances & Kenora, 

Ont Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Ontario Paper, Thorold, Ont Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) & others 

Philips Electronics, Toronto, Ont I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Power Super Markets, Toronto, Hamilton, 

Oshawa, Ont Butcher Workmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Price Bros., Kenogami & Riverbend, Que Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Price Bros., Dolbeau, Kenogami & Shipshaw, 

Que. Woodcutters, Farmers Union (Ind.) 

Provincial Paper, Thorold, Ont Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Quebec City, Que Municipal & School Empl. Federation (Ind.) 

(inside empl.) 
City of Quebec, Que Municipal & School Empl. Federation (Ind.) 

(outside empl.) 
Que. North Shore Paper, Baie Comeau, Que Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

Mill Wkrs. AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Ready-mix concrete (4 cos.), Toronto, Ont Teamsters (Ind.) 

;Sask. Government Sask. Civil Service (Ind.) (labour services) 

Shawinigan Chemicals, Shawinigan, Que CNTU-chartered local 

Steep Rock Mines, Steep Rock Lake, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Swift Cdn., (6 plants), Canada-wide Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto City, Ont Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Toronto City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

Toronto City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Toronto Metro. Municipality, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

Toronto Metro. Municipality, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

PART II— Negotiations in Progress During January 

Bargaining 

Anaconda American Brass, New Toronto, Ont Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Asbestos Corp. & others, Thetford Mines, Que. .. Mining Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Auto dealers, garages, (various), Vancouver, B.C. Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Automatic Electric, Brockville, Ont I.U.E. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Avro & Orenda Engines, Malton, Ont Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) (salaried empl.) 

Babcock-Wilcox & Goldie-McCulloch, Gait, Ont. Nat. Council of Cdn. Labour (Ind.) 

B.C. Electric, company-wide Office Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Brewers' Warehousing, province-wide, Ont Brewery Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Building material suppliers, Vancouver & Fraser 

Valley, B.C Teamsters (Ind.) 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 147 



Company and Location Union 

Burns & Co. (6 plants), Western Canada Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Calgary General Hospital, Calgary, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) 

Can. Steamship Lines, Ont. & Que Seafarers (AFL-CIO) 

Cdn. Canners, Vancouver, Penticton & Ashcroft, 

B.C Packinghouse Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. Celanese, Sorel, Que Textile Wkrs. Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. Industries Ltd., Millhaven, Ont Oil Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. Johns-Manville, Asbestos, Que Mining Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Cdn. Marconi, Montreal, Que Salaried Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

Cdn. Steel Foundries, Montreal, Que Steel & Foundry Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Clothing Mfrs. Assn., Quebec, Farnham & Vic- 

toriaville, Que Clothing Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Cluett Peabody, Kitchener & Stratford, Ont Amalgamated Clothing Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

C.N.R., C.P.R., other railways, system-wide 15 unions (non-operating empl.) 

Consolidated Mining & Smelting, Kimberley & 

Trail, B.C Mine, Mill & Smelter Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Dairies (various), Vancouver & New Westminster, 

B.C Teamsters (Ind.) 

Dominion Glass, Hamilton, Ont Glass & Ceramic Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dom. Structural Steel, Montreal, Que Mine Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Donahue Bros., Clermont, Que Carpenters (Lumber & Sawmill Wkrs.) (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Dosco, Cdn. Bridge, Walkerville, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dosco (Wabana Mines), Bell Island, Nfld Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dow Brewery, Montreal & Quebec, Que Brewery Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Eastern Can. Stevedoring, Halifax, N.S Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Edmonton City, Alta I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Edmonton City, Alta Public Empl. (CLC) (clerical empl.) 

Eldorado Mining, Eldorado, Sask Mine, Mill & Smelter Wkrs. (Ind.) 

Firestone Tire & Rubber, Hamilton, Ont Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Ford of Canada, Windsor, Ont Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Fry-Cadbury, Montreal, Que Bakery Wkrs. (CLC) 

Garment Mfrs. Assn., Winnipeg, Man Amalgamated Clothing Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Glove Mfrs. Assn., Montreal, St. Raymond, 

Loretteville, & St. Tite, Que Clothing Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber, New Toronto, Ont Rubber Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hiram Walker & Sons, Walkerville, Ont Distillery Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Hospitals (11), Montreal & district, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Hotel Chateau Laurier, (CNR), Ottawa, Ont Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC) 

Hotel Vancouver, Vancouver, B.C Railway, Transport & General Wkrs. (CLC) 

House of Seagrams, Que., Ont. & B.C Distillery Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Imperial Tobacco & subsidiaries, Ont. & Que Tobacco Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Kelly, Douglas, company-wide, B.C Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

Lake Asbestos of Que., Black Lake, Que Mining Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Manitoba Telephone I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (linemen) 

Manitoba Telephone I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (telephone 

operators) 

Manitoba Telephone Man. Telephone Assn. (Ind.) (clerical empl.) 

Maritime Tel. & Tel. & Eastern Electric, com- 
pany-wide I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC) (plant empl.) 

National Harbours Board, Montreal, Que Railway Clerks (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Nfld. Employers' Assn., St. Johns, Nfld Longshoremen's Protective Union (Ind.) 

Northern Electric, Belleville, Ont., & Montreal, 

Que Empl. Assn. (Ind.) (plant empl.) 

Northern Electric, Montreal, Que Office Empl. Assn. (Ind.) 

North York Township, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) (outside empl.) 

Ottawa City, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) 

Ottawa Civic Hospital, Ottawa, Ont Public Empl. (CLC) 

Pacific Press, Vancouver, B.C Newspaper Guild (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Regina General Hospital, Regina, Sask Public Empl. (CLC) 

Rio Algom Mines, (Milliken Mine), Elliott Lake, 

Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Rio Algom Mines, (Nordic Mine), Algoma Mills, 

Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Rowntree Co., Toronto, Ont Retail, Wholesale Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Steinberg's Ltd., Island of Montreal, Que Empl. Protective Assn. (Ind.) 

Toronto Electric Commissioners, Ont Public Service Empl. (CLC) 

Vancouver City, B.C Civic Empl. (Ind.) (outside empl.) 

Vancouver City, B.C Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Vancouver City, B.C Public Empl. (CLC) (inside empl.) 

Vancouver Police Commissioners Bd., B.C B.C. Peace Officers (CLC) 

Victoria Hospital, London, Ont Bldg. Service Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Conciliation Officer 

Assn. Patronale des Services Hospitaliers, (5 

hospitals), Drummondville & other points, Que. Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Avro & Orenda Engines, Malton, Ont Machinists (AFL-CIO/CLC) (plant empl.) 

C.B.C., company-wide Moving Picture Machine Operators (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

Cockshutt Farm Equip., Brantford, Ont Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

148 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



Company and Location Union 

Cyanamid of Canada, Welland, Ont Chemical Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dominion Stores, Toronto, Hamilton & other 

locations, Ont Retail, Wholesale Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dom. Textile Montreal, Que United Textile Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Lake Carriers Assn., Eastern Canada Seafarers (AFL-CIO) 

Montreal Cottons, Valleyfield, Que United Textile Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Motor Trans. Ind. Relations Bureau, Ont Teamsters (Ind.) (drivers) 

Motor Trans. Ind. Relations Bureau, Ont Teamsters (Ind.) (mechanics) 

Normetal Mining, Normetal, Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Phillips Electrical, Brockville, Ont I.U.E. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Que. Natural Gas, company-wide Chemical Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Quemont Mining, Noranda, Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Safeway, Shop-Easy & others, Victoria, Van- 
couver & New Westminster, B.C Butcher Workmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

T.C.A., company-wide Air Line Pilots (Ind.) 

Towboat Owners' Assn., B.C Merchant Service Guild (CLC) 

Conciliation Board 

Algoma Ore Properties, Wawa, Ont Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Cdn. Celanese, Drummondville, Que Textile Wkrs. Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

C.N.R., system-wide Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

C.N.R., system-wide Trainmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

C.P.R., system-wide Locomotive Firemen & Enginemen (AFL- 
CIO/CLC) 

C.P.R., system-wide Trainmen (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Chrysler Corporation, Windsor, Ont Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Dom. Textile, Montmorency, Sherbrooke, Magog 

& Drummondville, Que Textile Federation (CNTU) 

Ontario Hydro, company-wide Public Service Empl. (CLC) 

Smith Transport, Kingsway Transport & others, 

Ont. & Que Teamsters (Ind.) 

Post-Conciliation Bargaining 

Campbell Chibougamau Mines, Chibougamau, 

Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

C.N.R., system-wide Locomotive Engineers (Ind.) 

C.P.R., system-wide Locomotive Engineers (Ind.) 

Consolidated Paper, Shawinigan, Que Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper 

MH1 Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 
Massey-Ferguson, Toronto, Brantford & Wood- 
stock, Ont Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Noranda Mines, Noranda, Que Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Union composing rooms, Toronto, Ont Typographical Union (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

Arbitration 

Hotel Dieu St. Vallier, Chicoutimi, Que Service Empl. Federation (CNTU) 

Work Stoppage 

Hotel Royal York (CPR), Toronto, Ont Hotel Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC) 

PART III— Settlements Reached During January 1962 

(A summary of major terms on the basis of information immediately available. Figures for 
the number of employees covered are approximate.) 

B.C. Electric, company-wide — I.B.E.W. (AFL-CIO/CLC): 16-mo. agreement covering 734 
empl. — general wage increase of 30 an hr. retroactive to Dec. 1, 1961; Easter Monday to be 
observed as a paid holiday, making a total of 10 paid holidays (formerly 9); 3 wks. vacation after 
5 yrs. of service (formerly after 8 yrs.); labourer's rate will be $2 an hr. 

Bindery room employers, Toronto, Ont. — Bookbinders (AFL-CIO/CLC) : 2-yr. agree- 
ment covering 1,300 empl. — wage increases of 70 an hr. eff. Jan. 11, 1962 and 80 an hr. eff. Jan. 
11, 1963; 3 wks. vacation after 11 yrs. of service (formerly after 13 yrs.); new provision for 3 
days' bereavement pay; bookbinder's rate after Jan. 11, 1963 will be $2.67 an hr. 

Consolidated Paper, Cap de la Madeleine & Three Rivers, Que. — Paper Makers 
(AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC): 2-yr. agreement covering 1,200 
empl. — wage increase of 50 an hr. retroactive to May 1, 1961 and an additional 50 an hr. eff. 
May 1, 1962; 1 additional floating holiday, making a total of 7 paid holidays; evening and night 
shift premiums increased to 60 and 90 respectively, retroactive to May 1, 1961 and to 70 and 
100 eff. May 1, 1962 (previous shift premiums were 50 and 80); employees will be granted 1 wk. 
sick leave with pay; labourer's rate after May 1, 1962 will be $2.03 an hr. 

Consolidated Paper, Les Escoumins, Que. — Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation (CNTU) : 
1-yr. agreement covering 500 empl. — basic rate increased by 80 an hr. retroactive to Aug. 1, 1961; 
piece rate increases of 290 and 500 per cord. Labourer's rate will be $1.13 an hr. 

Consolidated Paper, Ste-Anne de Portneuf, Que. — Pulp & Paper Wkrs. Federation 
(CNTU) : 1-yr. agreement covering 900 empl. — basic rate increased by 70 an hr. retroactive to 
Aug. 1, 1961; piece rate increases of 120 and 330 per cord. Labourer's rate will be $1.13 an hr. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 149 

53741-5—3 



Dosco Fabrication Drvs., Trenton, N.S. — Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC) : 1-yr. agree- 
ment covering 697 empl. — no increase in hourly wages; 4 wks. vacation after 25 yrs. of service 
(previous maximum was 3 wks. after 15 yrs.); maximum pension benefits increased from $75 
a mo. to $115 a mo. 

Dryden Paper, Dryden, Ont. — Paper Makers (AFL-CIO/CLC), Pulp & Paper Mill Wkrs. 
(AFL-CIO/CLC) : 1-yr. agreement covering 800 empl. — company contribution to welfare plan 
increased to $4.25 (formerly $3.75); 1 additional paid holiday making an equivalent of 8 paid 
holidays annually. 

Ford of Canada, Windsor, Oakville & North York, Ont. — Auto Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC) : 
3-yr. agreement covering 7,500 empl. — $10 settlement pay; annual improvement factor wage 
increases (greater of 60 or 2i%) eff. Jan. 15 and Dec. 1, 1962 and Dec. 1, 1963 for a total of 
at least 180 an hr. over 3 yrs.; additional classification adjustments of 50 an hr. for empl. in the 
foundry and assembly plants, 200 an hr. over journeyman rates for leaders, 100 an hr. for electrical 
technicians; cost-of-living allowance formula (10 for each .6 points change in consumer price index) 
continued with 10 of allowance due Jan. 15, 1962 being applied to pensioners' benefits; non- 
contributory pension plan improved so that basic benefits will amount to $2.80 a mo. per yr. of 
service beginning on April 1, 1962 (formerly $2.50); on or after April 1, 1962, all pensioners will 
receive an additional 250 a mo. per yr. of service (maximum $10); new supplementary 
pension providing for $1.80 a mo. per yr. of service (maximum $55 a mo.) for empl. aged 65-70 
retiring on or after April 1, 1962, such benefit to cease at age 70; company to pay 50% of 
hospital and medical coverage for pensioners and their dependents; weekly S.U.B. increased to 62% 
of before-tax pay plus $1.50 for each dependent up to four dependents (formerly 65% of weekly 
after-tax straight-time pay); maximum weekly S.U.B. increased from $30 to $40 and maximum 
benefit period increased from 39 to 52 wks.; new short wk. benefit adopted for empl. who are 
laid off part of a wk. and are ineligible for unemployment insurance benefits; for scheduled short 
work weeks, 65% of straight-time rate will be paid for each hr. of layoff in a 40-hr. wk.; for 
unscheduled short work weeks, 50% of straight-time pay will be granted for each hr. of layoff; 
higher separation pay; new relocation allowance plan; company-paid medical and hospital 
coverage for laid-off empl. extended to a maximum of 12 mo.; full annual vacation pay qualifica- 
tion to be reduced in 1962 from 170 days to 1,000 hrs.; new provision for jury duty pay; shift 
premiums raised to 120 and 180 (previously 100 and 150); sickness and accident benefits increased 
from previous $40 a wk. to a maximum of $55 a wk.: increase in group life insurance to a 
maximum of $8,400; labourer's rate after Dec. 1, 1963 will be $2.23 an hr. 

Motor Trans. Ind. Relations Bureau (car carriers), Ont. — Teamsters (Ind.): 3-yr. 
agreement covering 725 empl. — settlement pay $2.50 a wk., $3 a wk. for skilled mechanics 
retroactive to July 1, 1961; increases of 60 an hr. (70 an hr. for skilled mechanics) eff. Jan. 13, 
1962, July 1, 1962, July 1, 1963; 2 wks. vacation after 2 yrs. of service (formerly after 3 yrs.); 
new jointly administered pension plan with equal monthly contributions by employers and 
employees, each contributing $3 per empl. the first yr., $4 the second yr.. $5 the third yr.: new 
jointly administered health and welfare plan with employers contributing $16 a mo. per employee; 
labourer's rate after July 1, 1963 will be $1.96 an hr. 

Motor Transport Labour Relations Council, B.C. — Teamsters (Ind.): 3-yr. agreement 
covering 1,250 empl. — wage increases of 70 an hr. eff. April 1, 1962, 80 an hr. eff. Jan. 1, 1963; 
employees will contribute 70 an hr. to pension plan; 3 wks. vacation after 10 yrs. of service 
(formerly after 12 yrs.) eff. Jan. 1, 1962, 3 wks. after 9 yrs. eff. Jan. 1, 1963, 3 wks. after 8 yrs. 
eff. Jan. 1, 1964; truck driver's rate after Jan. 1, 1963 will be $2.38 an hr. 

Northern Electric, Toronto, Ont. — Communications Wkrs. (AFL-CIO/CLC): 1-yr. 
agreement covering 1,000 empl. — wage increases ranging from 30 to 7i0 an hr. retroactive to 
Nov. 1, 1961; starting rate will be $1.66 an hr. 

Ottawa Transportation Commission, Ont. — Street Railway Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC): 
2-yr. agreement covering 628 empl. — wage increases of 30 an hr. eff. Jan. 1, 1962, 20 an hr. eff. 
Sept. 1, 1962 and May 1, 1963; 3 wks. vacation after 11 yrs. of service in 1962 (formerly after 
12 yrs.), 3 wks. vacation after 10 yrs. of service in 1963; 4 wks. vacation after 25 yrs. of service; 
company will pay 50% of cost of sick benefit, insurance and medical plans; bereavement leave 
increased from 1 day to 3 days; operator's rate after May 1, 1963 will be $2.07 an hr. 

Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Que. — Bldg. Service Empl. (AFL-CIO/CLC): 2-yr. 
agreement covering 1,000 empl. — $2.50 per wk. settlement pay retroactive to Jan. 1, 1962; wage 
increases varying from 200 to 500 an hr. eff. Jan. 15, 1962; $4 a wk. the second yr. of the 
agreement; hrs. reduced from 44 to 40 eff. Jan. 1, 1962; 3 wks. vacation after 8 yrs. of service 
(formerly after 12 yrs.); shift premium increased to 60 (formerly 50); sick leave will be cumulative 
up to a maximum of 45 days (formerly non-cumulative). 

Scarborough Township, Ont. — Public Empl. (CLC) (outside Empl.): 2-yr. agreement 
covering 550 empl. — wage increases of 7i0 an hr. eff. Jan. 1, 1962, Jan. 1, 1963; labourer's rate 
after Jan. 1, 1963 will be $2.05 an hr. 

Stelco (Hamilton Works), Hamilton, Ont. — Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC): 3-yr. 
agreement covering 8,500 empl. — 4i0 an hr. wage increase retroactive to Aug. 1, 1961 with an 
additional increase of 50 an hr. eff. Aug. 1, 1963; incremental increase of i0 an hr. eff. Aug. 1, 
1962, raising the increment between job classes to 6i0; pension increased to $3.15 a mo. per yr. of 
service (formerly $3); maximum monthly pension to be $126 instead of $110; compulsory retire- 
ment age to be reduced progressively from 70 to 68 yrs.; contributory group life insurance 
increased from $3,500 to $5,000; provision for paid-up insurance of $1,500 on retirement 
(formerly $1,250); weekly indemnity increased to $50 payable first day of an accident or eighth 
day of illness for 26 wks. (formerly $35); PSI blue plan to be adopted for employees, pensioners 
and dependents, and major medical insurance provided for employees; vacations with pay to be 
increased by 1 to 4 days for employees with 11 to 14 yrs. of service; rate for job class No. 1 
after Aug. 1, 1963 will be $2.05 an hr. 

Stelco (Canada Works), Hamilton, Ont. — Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC): 3-yr. agree- 
ment covering 680 empl. — terms similar to Hamilton Works settlement; rate for job class No 1 
will be $2.01* an hr. in 1963. 

Stelco, Montreal, Que. — Steelworkers (AFL-CIO/CLC): 3-yr. agreement covering 600 
empl. — terms similar to Hamilton Works settlement with comparable medical covering; rate for 
job class No. 1 will be $1.95 an hr. in 1963. 

150 THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



Civilian Rehabilitation 



Chamber of Commerce on Rehabilitation 

In its policy declarations and resolutions adopted at its last annual meeting 
the Canadian Chamber of Commerce supports placing of physically handicapped 
in suitable jobs and urges co-operation of employers in rehabilitation programs 



The Canadian Chamber of Commerce 
has based some of its policy declarations 
and resolutions on employment of the 
physically handicapped, rehabilitation, and 
employment of the older worker. These 
are being reprinted here. 

Employment of the Physically Handicapped 

It is suggested that many jobs do not 
require the full capacities of an able-bodied 
person. If a handicapped person still has 
the required capabilities, he is not handi- 
capped in that particular job. 

Recommendations: (1) that employers 
continue to co-operate in the placing of 
physically handicapped persons in suitable 
jobs; and (2) that employers who have not 
already done so investigate the possibilities 
of employing physically handicapped per- 



Rehabilitation Program 

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce 
believes that future financial assistance by 
the federal Government should be directed 
only to the areas in which the individual is 
unable to help himself, to the indigent, the 
aged, the chronically ill and to those who 
suffer catastrophic medical expense. It is 
for the above groups, and for the sub- 
stantially disabled who, lacking services, are 
likely to fall into these groups, that rehabili- 
tation is an investment in human welfare 
which should be adequately supported by 
federal assistance. 

The beginning of the rehabilitation of a 
patient is the adequate, proper skilled 
medical and surgical care that the in- 
dividual receives at, or soon after, the time 
of his primary illness or injury. These 
medical services, together with physical 
restoration, psychological, social and voca- 
tional services, should be supplied as neces- 
sary, so that the ultimate goal of complete 
rehabilitation is achieved. 

A co-ordinated rehabilitation program 
combining physical restoration, social, psy- 
chological and vocational services is a 
money-saving device, bringing satisfaction 
and independence to the severely handi- 
capped. 

Physical restoration must be aided by 
work assessment, counselling, guidance and 
help in job placement and retraining where 
necessary. In this respect, existing facilities 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 

53741-5— 3i 



in the community, such as technical insti- 
tutes and business schools, should be used. 

The rehabilitated individual will be an 
economic asset to employers, and rehabilita- 
tion methods should be based on sound 
knowledge and experience. By applying 
common sense, the procedures can be 
kept simple and inexpensive, and where pos- 
sible should be carried out in the local com- 
munity, using available services. 

Recommendations: (1) that the federal 
Government encourage and support the 
Provinces in every way possible to develop 
co-ordinated rehabilitation programs which 
will provide such facilities and services as 
are necessary to bring comprehensive 
rehabilitation to those individuals who can 
benefit; and (2) that in developing such 
services, the fullest co-operation of em- 
ployers, workers, government and voluntary 
agents should be encouraged. 

Employment of the Older Worker 

Studies have indicated that the older 
worker, if properly placed, can compare 
favourably in performance with other 
workers and can make a considerable con- 
tribution to the production of the country. 
Furthermore, the older worker group repre- 
sents a reservoir of skill and experience 
that the country can ill afford to waste. 
The addition of older workers to our labour 
force would enlarge our productive capacity. 

Recommendation: that Canadian em- 
ployers recognize the skill and experience of 
older workers and give consideration to the 
suitable employment of this group to the 
fullest extent practicable. 

New School of Rehabilitation Medicine in B.C. 

A school of rehabilitation medicine has 
been established at the University of British 
Columbia. The new school, which opened 
last fall with an enrolment of 15 students, 
will provide training leading to a certificate 
in physical medicine therapy. The course 
provides for two years of study at the 
university followed by a third rotating 
supervised interne year. 

The Canadian Arthritis and Rheumatism 
Society has made a grant of $5,000 toward 
the cost of converting a building to house 
the school. 

Medical Rehabilitation Grants from 
the federal Government will help provide 
staff and equipment. 



151 



Women's Bureau 



The Women Workers of Denmark 

Slightly more than one third of all workers in Denmark are women, and women 
workers make up 42 per cent of all girls and women more than 14 years of age 



In Denmark, slightly over one third of 
all workers are women. These 721,800 
(at the 1955 Census) working women make 
up 42 per cent of all girls and women over 
14 years of age. 

Occupations — Unlike Canada, where 
clerical work is the leading occupation of 
women, in Denmark "assisting wives" 
(unpaid family workers) form the largest 
group of women workers. These women, 
married to independent farmers or trades- 
men, assist their husbands. They make up 
about 18 per cent of all working women 
in the country. 

The next largest occupational group — 17 
per cent of all working women — is domestic 
servants in private homes. The clerical 
group comes third with about 10 per cent. 
Large numbers of women are employed as 
sewing machine operators, hairdressers, 
retail saleswomen, cooks and waitresses, 
charwomen and food wrappers, packagers 
and bottle machine operators. The food 
and beverages and the clothing and textiles 
industries engage the majority of women 
working in manufacturing. 

Most professional women in Denmark, as 
in Canada, are either nurses or teachers. In 
contrast to Canada, about 25 per cent of 
dentists are women, a high proportion of 
them being engaged in the schools. Women 
make up 15 per cent of doctors, 10 per cent 
of lawyers and about 3 per cent of 
engineers. 

Before the war most social workers were 
women but recently more men are entering 
the profession so that women now make up 
only 25 per cent of the graduating classes. 
Since 1948 women have been ordained as 
ministers and today there are 12 women 
pastors serving in the Danish national 
church. 

Marital Status — About 40 per cent of 
working women are married — 135,000 
"assisting wives" and 145,500 married 
women wage earners. The latter group has 
been steadily increasing in recent years. 
From 1950 to 1955 the number of married 
women in the population increased by 5.7 
per cent, but the number of married women 
wage earners increased by 16.2 per cent; of 
"assisting wives" by only 6.2 per cent. Dur- 
ing the same period the number of women 
not in the labour force increased by only 3.6 
per cent. 



Wages — The Danish Confederation of 
Trade Unions has accepted the principle of 
equal pay and is seeking to apply it through 
collective bargaining. The rates for 
apprentices in the skilled trades are the 
same for both sexes. At present, however, 
women in manufacturing generally receive 
82 per cent of the wages paid to men doing 
the same jobs, although under recent agree- 
ments women workers are paid the same 
cost of living allowances as men. Women 
in the National Civil Service and in muni- 
cipal government jobs receive equal pay for 
equal work. 

Services for working mothers — Working 
mothers are entitled to maternity leave for 
eight to twelve weeks before and four to 
six weeks after the birth of a child. Under 
the social insurance system, women are paid 
a proportion of their regular pay during the 
leave period. 

Creches, nurseries and kindergartens are 
subsidized by the national and local authori- 
ties, and are run by local authorities, chari- 
table organizations and employers. In some 
industrial towns, firms have pooled their 
resources to provide nurseries and other 
welfare facilities for their workers' children. 
Thus, in one district of Copenhagen some 
20 firms jointly run a creche for very young 
children, a nursery for those between the 
ages of two and seven, a recreation centre 
for those of school age and a youth centre 
for young people between 14 and 18 years 
of age. 

Women in trade unions — More than 25 
per cent of women workers are members of 
trade unions and they make up about 20 
per cent of the total membership of the 
Danish Trade Union Federation. In most 
cases men and women belong to the same 
unions, but one special union for unskilled 
women workers has 45,000 members. 

The Federation has set up a special 
women's bureau to which every union in 
which women form more than two per cent 
of the membership may belong. The bureau 
holds bi-annual weekend seminars for the 
study of social problems and submits ques- 
tions concerning women workers to Parlia- 
mentary committees. 

Age of retirement — In the government 
service the age of retirement is the same for 
men and women. Private industry, with a 
few exceptions, follows government practice. 



152 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



INTERNATIONAL 
LABOUR ORGANIZATION 



Morse Withdraws Resignation 



As a result of representations made to him since he announced, in November, 
his intention not to seek re-election, ILO Director-General decides to stay on 



David A. Morse, who last November 
announced his intention to resign as 
Director-General of the International 
Labour Office (L.G., Dec. 1961, p. 1264), 
has withdrawn his resignation, the ILO 
reported last month. The resignation would 
have become effective later this year. 

Mr. Morse had informed the ILO 
Governing Body that, after many years of 
public service abroad, he planned to 
"resume again the duties and responsibilities 
of normal citizenship" in his own country 
(the United States). 

As reasons for the change in his decision, 
he stated that representations to remain in 
office had been made to him by several 
members of the Governing Body. "In 
particular," he said, "I have had to take 
into account the important effort being 
made at present to improve the international 
situation and the essential role which inter- 
national organizations such as the ILO are 
called upon to play in this specially critical 
period in world affairs." He had therefore 
set aside his personal considerations that 
had motivated his earlier action, Mr. Morse 
stated. 

He was elected Director-General on June 
12, 1948, for a term of 10 years. On May 
31, 1957 he was re-elected for a term of 
five years. 

If he completes another term of office, 
Mr. Morse will have served as Director- 




General of the ILO for 20 years, longer 
than any other. Even at the time of his 
intended resignation, he was senior in years 
of service to any of the other heads of 
organizations associated with the United 
Nations. 



Offers Scholarship to International Institute for Labour Studies 

The General Council of the British Trades Union Congress has decided to finance a 
scholarship for the 12-week course to be held at the International Institute for Labour 
Studies in Geneva from September 17 to December 7 (L.G., Nov. 1961, p. 1144). 

The central theme of the course will be "The Labour Force and Its Employment." 
The 12-week period will also be devoted to the study of a number of labour problems such 
as wages, workers' organizations, relations between employers and workers and workers' 
participation in management and social institutions of the undertaking, social security and 
welfare, special labour problems relating to rural areas, and labour problems of economic 
growth and development planning. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



153 



TEAMWORK 
in INDUSTRY 



Main goal of the labour-management 
committee at Greb Shoes Ltd., Winnipeg, 
Man., is to maintain quality, and plant 
manager Charles Greb reports that manage- 
ment, through the committee, has received 
numerous helpful suggestions. After quality, 
he would list production problems, tech- 
niques and changes, in that order. 

Of the LMC itself he said: "We are 
pleased to have this group in our plant as 
it gives us an excellent means of talking to 
our people in open and frank terms about 
these matters." He also remarked on the 
high level of enthusiasm among committee 
members — an enthusiasm that is beginning 
to rub off on all plant personnel. 

Mr. Greb struck an encouraging note of 
comfort for new committees struggling to 
achieve effectiveness and purpose. "Our 
own labour-management committee has 
been in operation for less than a year," he 
said, "and to date has suffered what I 
imagine are the normal growing pains. "We 
were very enthused about the first few 
meetings, at which a lot of points were 
raised and discussed, and a lot of decisions 
reached. Following this, a slump occurred, 
and very few items came up for discussion." 

Latest meetings of the LMC have been 
"very encouraging", and management re- 
ports that joint co-operation has success- 
fully revitalized the committee. Chairman- 
ship is to be alternated annually between 
union and management representatives. 

Chief purchasing agent Dave Dobbin 
believes plant morale improved sharply 
when employees realized that the LMC, 
composed equally of company and union 
representatives, had given them a voice 
in many phases of the company's operation. 
Plant superintendent Paul Cook reported 
recently that the atmosphere between com- 
pany and union had improved considerably 
since management took the committee into 
its confidence. A standing invitation to sit 
in on meetings was issued to Sam Good- 
man, manager of Local 430L, Winnipeg 
Leather Workers' Union of the Amalga- 
mated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen 
of North America (CLC). 

Mary Bouma, shop steward and vice- 
president of Local 430L, states that there 
are "no more fences" between labour and 
management in the plant. She told a Depart- 
ment of Labour interviewer that the fences 



went out when the LMC came in. "We 
work together better than we did before, 
too," she added. Mrs. Bouma is a machine 
operator and a member of the plant's labour- 
management committee. 

* * * 

President Paul DuVal of Acme Sash and 
Door Company Ltd., St. Boniface, Man., 
asserts that joint consultation between 
labour and management helps to clarify and 
sharpen a man's thinking. "If you're going 
to justify some move or change to your 
employees, you've got to justify it to your- 
self first," he told a Department of Labour 
representative. "Frank give-and-take in regu- 
lar meetings between company and union 
representatives provides management with 
a good double-check on its own thinking." 

George Verstraete provided an example 
of how costly errors can be eliminated when 
labour and management pool their ex- 
perience. A member of Millmen Local 1901, 
United Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners (CLC). Mr. Verstraete represents 
his union on the firm's joint consultation 
committee. 

Last spring, Acme management handed 
committee members the blueprints of a new 
layout for the mill and asked for expres- 
sions of opinion. "At the time we discussed 
the plans, it was intended to move the 
cabinet shop from the second to the ground 
floor of the mill," said Mr. Verstraete. 
"After several discussions about this, the 
committee recommended that the shop be 
left where it was." 

Some additional changes were made in 
management's original plans as a result of 
committee recommendations, and some pro- 
jects were abandoned completely. By put- 
ting their heads together in time, labour 
and management avoided what would have 
been a costly error. 

Union spokesmen have stated that this 
close collaboration between management 
and the committee is also improving rela- 
tions and raising morale. Production man- 
ager Allen Sidebottom described it as "a 
good bridge between company and union 
thinking — something we never had before." 
The employees, he added, are volunteering 
ideas on production, cost and waste 
problems. 



Establishment of Labour-Management 
Committees is encouraged and assisted by 
the Labour-Management Co-operation Serv- 
ice, Industrial Relations Branch, Department 
of Labour. In addition to field representa- 
tives located in key industrial centres who 
are available to help both managements and 
trade unions, the Service provides various 
aids in the form of booklets, posters and 
films. 



154 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS 
AND CONCILIATION 



Certification and Other Proceedings before 

the Canada Labour Relations Board 



The Canada Labour Relations Board met 
for three days during December. The Board 
issued nine certificates designating bargain- 
ing agents, ordered three representation 
votes, rejected four applications for cer- 
tification and denied two requests under 
Section 61 (2) of the Act for review of 
earlier decisions. During the month the 
Board received nine applications for cer- 
tification. 

Applications for Certification Granted 

1. Brotherhood of Railway and Steam- 
ship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express and 
Station Employees, on behalf of a unit of 
longshoremen employed by Western Ter- 
minals Limited at Corner Brook, Nfld. 
(L.G., Nov. 1961, p. 1150). 

2. The International Association of 
Machinists, on behalf of a unit of catering 
department employees employed by the 
Quebec North Shore and Labrador Rail- 
way Company, Sept lies, Que. (L.G., Dec. 
1961, p. 1269). 

3. Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, on 
behalf of a unit of trainmen in yard and 
road service employed by the Sydney and 
Louisburg Railway Company, Glace Bay, 
N.S. (L.G., Dec. 1961, p. 1269). 

4. General Drivers, Warehousemen and 
Helpers, Local Union 979, of the Interna- 
tional Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America, on behalf of a unit of employees 
of East-West Transport Ltd., working in 
and out of the company's terminal at 360 
Dawson Road, St. Boniface, Man. (L.G., 
Dec. 1961, p. 1269). 

5. Canadian Maritime Union, on behalf 
of a unit of unlicensed employees employed 
aboard the S.S. Hilda Marjanne by Trans- 
Lake Shipping Limited, Toronto, (L.G., 
Jan., p. 52). The Seafarers' International 
Union of Canada had intervened. 

6. Canadian Maritime Union, on behalf 
of a unit of unlicensed employees employed 
aboard the S.S. Keewatin and S.S. Assini- 



boia by the Canadian Pacific Railway Com- 
pany (Great Lakes Steamships) Montreal, 
Que. (L.G., Jan., p. 52). The Seafarers' 
International Union of Canada had in- 
tervened. 

7. The Canadian Union of Operating 
Engineers, on behalf of a unit of stationary 
engineers employed by Canadian Arsenals 
Limited, Small Arms Division, Long 
Branch, Ont. (L.G., Jan., p. 52). 

8. Amalgamated Association of Street, 
Electric Railway and Motor Coach Em- 
ployees of America, Division 591, on behalf 
of a unit of garage employees and bus 
operators employed by Hull City Transport 
Limited, Hull, Que. (L.G., Jan., p. 52). 

9. Amalgamated Association of Street, 
Electric Railway, and Motor Coach Em- 
ployees of America, Division 591, on be- 
half of a unit of garage employees and bus 
operators employed by the Hull Metro- 
politan Transport Limited, Hull, Que. (L.G., 
Jan., p. 52). 

Representation Votes Ordered 

1. Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehouse- 
men and Helpers, Local No. 91 of the In- 
ternational Brotherhood of Teamsters, 
Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America, applicant, and MacGregor the 
Mover, Limited, Kingston, Ont., respondent 
(L.G., Dec. 1961, p. 1269) (Returning 
Officer: A. B. Whitfield). 

2. United Steelworkers of America, appli- 
cant, and Canadian Arsenals Limited, re- 
spondent (Small Arms Division, Long 
Branch, Ont.) (L.G., Jan., p. 52) (Return- 
ing Officer: A. B. Whitfield). 

3. Line Drivers, Warehousemen, Pickup 
Men and Dockmen's Union, Local No. 605 
of the International Brotherhood of Team- 
sters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Help- 
ers of America, applicant, and Zenith 
Transport Limited, Vancouver, B.C., re- 
spondent (L.G., Jan., p. 52) (Returning 
Officer: D. S. Tysoe). 



This section covers proceedings under the Industrial Relations and Disputes Investi- 
gation Act, involving the administrative services of the Minister of Labour, the Canada 
Labour Relations Board, and the Industrial Relations Branch of the Department. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



155 



Applications for Certication Rejected 

1. International Union, United Automo- 
bile, Aircraft and Agricultural Implement 
Workers of America, applicant and KLM 
Royal Dutch Airlines, Montreal, Que., 
respondent (L.G., Oct. 1961, p. 1037). The 
application was rejected because the appli- 
cant union did not, in the Board's opinion, 
represent a majority of the employees in 
the enlarged unit which the Board had 
decided to be appropriate for collective 
bargaining. 

2. Seafarers' International Union of 
Canada, applicant, and Porter Shipping 
Limited, Toronto, Ont., respondent (un- 
licensed personnel) (L.G., Nov. 1961, p. 
1149) (See item 3 immediately below for 
reason for rejection). 

3. Seafarers' International Union of 
Canada, applicant, and Porter Shipping 



Limited, Toronto, Ont., respondent (marine 
engineers) (L.G., Nov. 1961, p. 1149). 

Cases 2 and 3 were rejected for the 
reason that the applicant union had failed 
to satisfy the Board that at the time when 
the applications were made, a majority of 
the employees affected in each case were 
members in good standing under the pro- 
visions of the applicant union's constitution 
and of Section 15 of the Rules of Procedure 
of the Board. 

4. Canadian Maritime Union, applicant, 
Owen Sound Transportation Co., Limited, 
Owen Sound, Ont., respondent, and the 
Seafarers' International Union, intervener 
(unlicensed personnel) (L.G., Jan., p. 52). 
The application was rejected for the reason 
that it was not supported by a majority of 
the employees affected. In giving this deci- 
sion the Board stated that it found that 



Scope and Administration of Industrial Relations and Disputes Investigation Act 



Conciliation services under the Industrial 
Relations and Disputes investigation Act are 
provided by the Minister of Labour through 
the Industrial Relations Branch. The branch 
also acts as the administrative arm of the 
Canada Labour Relations Board, in matters 
under the Act involving the board. 

The Industrial Relations and Disputes 
Investigation Act came into force on Sep- 
tember 1, 1948. It revoked the Wartime 
Labour Relations Regulations, P.C. 1003, 
which became effective in March, 1944, and 
repealed the Industrial Disputes Investigation 
Act, which had been in force from 1907 
until superseded by the Wartime Regulations 
in 1944. Decisions, order and certificates 
given under the Wartime Regulations by the 
Minister of Labour and the Wartime Labour 
Relations Board are continued in force and 
effect by the Act. 

The Act applies to industries within 
federal jurisdiction, i.e., navigation, shipping, 
interprovincial railways, canals, telegraphs, 
interprovincial and international steamship 
lines and ferries, aerodromes and air trans- 
portation, radio broadcasting stations and 
works declared by Parliament to be for the 
general advantage of Canada or two or 
more of its provinces. Additionally, the Act 
provides that provincial authorities, if they 
so desire, may enact similar legislation for 
application to industries within provincial 
jurisdiction and make mutually satisfactory 
arrangements with the federal Government 
for the administration of such legislation. 

The Minister of Labour is charged with 
the administration of the Act and is directly 
responsible for the appointment of con- 
ciliation officers, conciliation boards, and 
Industrial Inquiry Commissions concerning 
complaints that the Act has been violated 
or that a party has failed to bargain collec- 
tively, and for application for consent to 
prosecute. 

The Canada Labour Relations Board is 
established under the Act as successor to 



the Wartime Labour Relations Board to 
administer provisions concerning the certi- 
fication of bargaining agents, the writing of 
provisions — for incorporation into collective 
agreements — fixing a procedure for the final 
settlement of disputes concerning the mean- 
ing or violation of such agreements and the 
investigation of complaints referred to it by 
the minister that a party has failed to 
bargain collectively and to make every 
reasonable effort to conclude a collective 
agreement. 

Copies of the Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act, the Regulations 
made under the Act, and the Rules of 
Procedure of the Canada Labour Relations 
Board are available upon request to the 
Department of Labour, Ottawa. 

Proceedings under the Industrial Rela- 
tions and Disputes Investigation Act are 
reported below under two headings: (1) 
Certification and other Proceedings before 
the Canada Labour Relations Board, and 
(2) Conciliation and other Proceedings 
before the Minister of Labour. 

Industrial Relations Officers of the De- 
partment of Labour are stationed at Vancou- 
ver, Winnipeg, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, 
Fredericton, Halifax and St. Johns', New- 
foundland. The territory of four officers 
resident in Vancouver comprises British 
Columbia, Alberta and the Yukon and 
Northwest Territories; two officers stationed 
in Winnipeg cover the provinces of Saskat- 
chewan and Manitoba and Northwestern 
Ontario; four officers resident in Toronto 
confine their activities to Ontario; five 
officers in Montreal are assigned to the 
province of Quebec, and a total of three 
officers resident in Fredericton, Halifax and 
St. John's represent the Department in the 
Maritime Provinces and Newfoundland. The 
headquarters of the Industrial Relations 
Branch and the Director of Industrial Rela- 
tions and staff are situated in Ottawa. 



156 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



there was no evidence of fraud or bad faith 
on the part of the applicant union as alleged 
by the intervener. 

Request for Review under Section 61(2) Denied 

1. North American Van Lines (Atlantic) 
Limited, Dartmouth and Middleton, N.S., 
applicant, and Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Ware- 
housemen and Helpers Union, Local 927 of 
the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, 
Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America, respondent (L.G., Jan., p. 52). 
The Board denied the request for the rea- 
son that it considered that it dealt with 
the case in a reasonable and proper manner 
and stated that it is not prepared to vary 
or revoke its decision to certify the appli- 
cant union, nor to grant the request for 
a hearing, full opportunity for which was 
given prior to the issuance of certification. 

2. International Alliance of Theatrical 
Stage Employees and Moving Picture Ma- 
chine Operators of the United States and 
Canada, applicant, and Atlantic Broadcasters 
Limited, Antigonish, N.S., respondent (L.G., 
Jan., p. 53). The request, which was for the 
transfer of bargaining rights from the Inter- 
tional to its Local Union No. 848, was 
denied by the Board for the reason that 
the Board has no authority to transfer 
bargaining rights from one bargaining agent 
to another. 

Applications for Certification Received 

1. Line Drivers, Warehousemen, Pickup 
Men and Dockmen's Union, Local No. 605, 
of the International Brotherhood of Team- 
sters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America, on behalf of a unit 
of employees of Gill Interprovincial Lines 
Ltd., North Burnaby, B.C. (Investigating 
Officer: D. S. Tysoe). 

2. Line Drivers, Warehousemen, Pickup 
Men and Dockmen's Union, Local No. 605, 
of the International Brotherhood of Team- 
sters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America, on behalf of a unit 
of employees of Millar & Brown Ltd., 
Cranbrook, B.C. (Investigating Officer: D. S. 
Tysoe). 



3. Line Drivers, Warehousemen, Pickup 
Men and Dockmen's Union, Local No. 
605, of the International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America, on behalf of a unit 
of employees of Pacific Inland Express Ltd. 
Vancouver, B.C. (Investigating Officer: 
D. S. Tysoe). 

4. Line Drivers, Warehousemen, Pickup 
Men and Dockmen's Union, Local No. 605, 
of the International Brotherhood of Team- 
sters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America, on behalf of a unit 
of employees of Canadian Freightways 
Limited, Calgary, Alta. (Investigating 
Officer: D.S. Tysoe). 

5. Dairymen, Warehousemen, Cartage- 
men, Truckers and Helpers of America, 
Local Union No. 987 of the International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, 
Warehousemen and Helpers of America, on 
behalf of a unit of employees of Rice and 
Trimble Limited, Calgary, Alta. (Investi- 
gating Officer: D. S. Tysoe). 

6. Dairymen, Warehousemen, Cartage- 
men, Truckers and Helpers of America, 
Local Union No. 987 of the International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, 
Warehousemen and Helpers of America, on 
behalf of a unit of employees of Gossett 
and Sons Transport Limited, Calgary, Alta., 
(Investigating Officer: D. S. Tysoe). 

7. Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, 
Transport and General Workers, on behalf 
of a unit of employees of Empire Freight- 
ways Limited, working in and out of its 
terminals in Saskatchewan (Investigating 
Officer: W. E. Sproule). 

8. The Commercial Telegraphers' Union, 
Canadian National Telegraphs System, Divi- 
sion No. 43, on behalf of a unit of diesel 
mechanics employed by the Canadian Rail- 
ways in its Telecommunication Department 
(Investigating Officer: T. B. McRae). 

9. International Union of Operating 
Engineers, Local 882, on behalf of a 
unit of stationary engineers employed by 
the Pacific Tanker Co., Ltd., Vancouver, 
B.C. (Investigating Officer: G. H. Purvis). 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • 

53741-5—4 



FEBRUARY 7962 



157 



Conciliation and Other Proceedings 

before the Minister of Labour 






Conciliation Officers Appointed 

During December, the Minister of Labour 
appointed Conciliation Officers to deal with 
the following disputes: 

1. Canadian Pacific Air Lines, Limited, 
Vancouver, and Canadian Air Line Flight 
Attendant's Association (Conciliation Of- 
ficer G. R. Currie). 

2. Kitchener-Waterloo Broadcasting Com- 
pany Limited, and National Association of 
Broadcast Employees and Technicians (Con- 
ciliation Officer: T. B. McRae). 

3. Baton Aldred Rogers Broadcasting 
Limited (CFTO-TV) Agincourt, Ont., and 
National Association of Broadcast Em- 
ployees and Technicians (Conciliation 
Officer: T. B. McRae). 

4. Hector Broadcasting Co. Ltd. (Radio 
Station CKEC) and Cape Breton Projection- 
ists Union, Local 848 of the International 
Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees and 
Moving Picture Machine Operators of the 
United States and Canada (Conciliation 
Officer: D. T. Cochrane). 

5. Baton Aldred Rogers Broadcasting 
Limited (CFTO-TV) Agincourt, Ont., and 
Toronto Newspaper Guild, Local 87 of 
the American Newspaper Guild, (Concilia- 
tion Officer: T. B. McRae). 

Conciliation Boards Appointed 

1. Canadian National Steamship Company 
Limited (Pacific Coast Service) Vancouver, 
and Seafarers' International Union of North 
America, Canadian District (L.G., Dec. 
1961, p. 1270). 

2. Motor Transport Industrial Relations 
Bureau (certain member Companies in Que- 
bec) and Local 106 of the International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, 
Warehousemen and Helpers of America 
(L.G., Dec. 1961, p. 1271). 

3. Robin Hood Flour Mills Limited, Port 
Colborne, Ont., and Local 416 of the 
United Packinghouse Workers of America 
(L.G., Dec. 1961, p. 1270). 

Conciliation Board Reports Received 

1. Canadian National Railways (Atlantic, 
Central and Western Regions) and Brother- 



hood of Locomotive Engineers (L.G., 
Aug. 1961, p. 797). The text of the report 
is reproduced below. 

2. Canadian Pacific Railway Company 
(Atlantic, Eastern, Prairie and Pacific 
Regions and Quebec Central Railway Com- 
pany) and Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Engineers (L.G., Aug. 1961, p. 798). The 
text of the report is reproduced below. 

3. Barnhill's Transfer Limited, Truro, 
N.S., and Locals 76 and 927 of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of Amer- 
ica (L.G., Nov. 1961, p. 1151). The text of 
the report is reproduced below. 

Strike after Board Procedure 

Motor Transport Industrial Relations 
Bureau, Toronto (representing certain Com- 
panies within federal jurisdiction) and Local 
880 of the International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and 
Helpers of America (L.G., Jan., p. 68). 
Stoppage of work occurred November 
26, 1961. 

Settlement Reached during Board Procedure 

Barnhill's Transfer Limited, Truro, N.S., 
and Locals 76 and 927 of the International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, 
Warehousemen and Helpers of America 
(L.G., Nov. 1961, p. 1151). 

Disputes Lapsed 

1. Sabre Freight Lines Limited (Burnaby, 
B.C. Terminal) and Local 605 of the 
International Brotherhood of Teamsters, 
Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of 
America (L.G., Nov. 1961, p. 1150). 

2. McCabe Grain Company Limited, 
Edmonton, and Local 514 of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauf- 
feurs, Warehousemen and Helpers of Amer- 
ica (L.G., May 1961, p. 473). 

3. Tippet-Richardson (Ottawa) Limited, 
Ottawa, Ont., and Canadian Brotherhood 
of Railway, Transport and General Workers 
(L.G., July 1961, p. 675). 



158 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



Report of Board in Dispute between 

Canadian National Railways 

and 

Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers 



The Board of Conciliation and Investiga- 
tion appointed under the Industrial Relations 
and Disputes Investigation Act to deal with 
the dispute between the Canadian National 
Railways and the Brotherhood of Loco- 
motive Engineers (Atlantic and Central and 
Western Regions) met the parties in Mont- 
real on August 8 and 9 and on September 
19, 20 and 21, and again on September 27, 
1961. The members of the Board were 
present at all meetings except the meeting 
of September 27, and at this meeting Mr. 
Lapointe wasn't present, and the parties 
were engaged all the day of September 27 in 
an effort to conciliate the matters in dis- 
pute. The Board also met in Montreal on 
November 9 in executive session to discuss 
the recommendations to be made. 

The Brotherhood on opening the contract 
asked for many amendments to the con- 
tract. Both the Brotherhood and the 
Company submitted lengthy briefs in sup- 
port of their requests for amendments and 
as well submitted rebuttal statements in 
connection with all the issues raised. 

The Board finds it necessary to report on 
all issues because, although a serious effort 
was made to conciliate the issues in dispute, 
it wasn't successful in so doing. The Board, 
therefore, will first report on the requested 
amendments (all except salary increases) 
as put forward by the Brotherhood and then 
on the requested amendments as put forward 
by the Company, and will then deal with 
the question of salaries. 



the ordinary 8.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m. hours 
of work are considered normal, and if work 
occurs at other hours, because of the 
interference with family life or leisure time, 
often a differential for such off-hours work 
is paid. In some companies, who don't 
normally have a second or third shift, the 
additional pay acts to some extent as an 
incentive for the company not to schedule 
work during "off" hours. 

There are, however, other companies who 
are on a two- or three-shift operation 
steadily. The locomotive engineer in yard 
service must perform work on a 24-hour 
basis, and sometimes work is performed 
seven days a week. However, the most 
senior man is entitled to pick his hours, and 
if the most senior man, or men, desire a 
day-time shift, they receive it through the 
exercise of their seniority. Also, because 
junior men, no matter how junior, receive 
the same rate of pay as senior men, the 
Railway submits that the engineer is already 
receiving what amounts to a differential 
because the senior man has the choice of the 
assignment, and the junior man gets pay 
equal to that of the senior man if he is 
working on an afternoon or evening shift. 
This arrangement is quite different from that 
found in industrial trades generally. 

Recommendation — The Board is of the 
opinion that because of this, and because 
of the substantial extra cost involved, it 
should not recommend that the Brother- 
hood request be granted. 



Requests 

1. Yard Service 

Under this request the Brotherhood is asking 
that a locomotive engineer in yard service 
starting to work between the hours of 12 noon 
and 5.59 p.m. receive an additional 5% in 
basic rates of pay for each shift, and that the 
locomotive engineer starting to work between 
6.00 p.m. and 5.00 a.m. will receive an addi- 
tional 10% in basic rates of pay for each shift. 

Differentials in shift work, afternoon and 
evening, are quite common in industrial 
labour contracts, the basic theory being 
that when an employee is required to work 
during hours other than what is considered 
normal working hours, he should be paid 
additional compensation. In other words, 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 

53741-5— 4£ 



During December, the Minister of Labour 
received the Report of the Board of Con- 
ciliation and Investigation established to 
deal with a dispute between the Canadian 
National Railways and the Brotherhood of 
Locomotive Engineers. 

The Board was under the chairmanship 
of His Honour Judge J. C. Anderson of 
Belleville, Ont. He was appointed by the 
Minister in the absence of a joint recom- 
mendation from the other two members, 
T. R. Meighen, Q.C., and Marc Lapointe, 
both of Montreal, nominees of the company 
and union, respectively. 

The majority report, which under the 
provisions of the Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act constitutes the 
Report of the Board, was submitted by the 
Chairman and Mr. Meighen. The minority 
report was submitted by Mr. Lapointe. 

The majority and minority reports are 
reproduced here. 



159 



2. Annual Vacation with Pay 

This request is that an employee who at the 
beginning of the calendar year has completed 
25 years' continuous service and who has 
rendered compensated service in 250 calendar 
months, calculated from the date of entering 
service, will be allowed one calendar day's 
vacation for each 13 days worked and/or 
available for service or major portion of such 
days during the preceding calendar year with 
a maximum of four weeks. Compensation for 
such vacation will be 8% of gross wages of 
an employee during the preceding calendar 
year. 

Recommendation — The Board recom- 
mends that employees who have completed 
25 years continuous service be allowed four 
weeks vacation with pay, and that the 
compensation for such vacation will be 8 
per cent of the gross wages paid the em- 
ployee during the preceding calendar year. 
The actual wording necessary to put this 
vacation rule into effect should be left to 
the parties to work out between themselves. 

3. M.U. Cars 

This request is that locomotive engineers 

handling M.U. cars be paid on the basis of 

total weight on drivers of all units used in the 
train handled. 

This request affects the electric locomo- 
tives that are used in the tunnel in Montreal, 
and there are about 11 or 12 engineers 
affected. The runs are short runs and on 
many occasions, in addition to the trolley 
car or cars, which receive the power, other 
cars are hauled as trailers. This is a special 
type of service and is not duplicated any- 
where else on any other Canadian railway. 
The continuous time on duty is relatively 
short, and according to the submissions 
made, many engineers prefer this type of 
work because they have certain time off in 
the city of Montreal between runs. 

Recommendation — In view of the recom- 
mendations made here later having to do 
with general increases, the Board does not 
see fit to recommend that this request of 
the Brotherhood be granted. 

4. Passenger Service 

The Brotherhood request that overtime in all 
passenger service be paid at the rate of 20 
m.p.h. 

This request affects locomotive engineers 
assigned on short turn passenger service (no 
single trip of which exceeds 80 miles) who 
are presently paid at an overtime rate of 12£ 
miles per hour. In straight-away or long 
turn-around service overtime is computed 
from time of departure from initial pas- 
senger station until time of arrival at final 



passenger station, on a speed basis of 20 
miles per hour, and doesn't come into effect 
until the time exceeds the miles run 
divided by 20. 

In other words, in passenger runs of 150 
miles, overtime would begin at the expira- 
tion of seven hours and thirty minutes plus 
the time at the initial terminal, but in short 
turn-around passenger service, no single trip 
of which exceeds 80 miles, overtime is paid 
at the rate of 12i miles per hour at pro rata 
rates and does not begin until the expiration 
of eight hours, when the release from duty 
at any point does not exceed one hour. 

Historically, the basic day in regular 
passenger service has not been applied to 
suburban and branch line commuter service. 
As the Board understands it, an engineer 
receiving overtime in short turn-around 
service receives such overtime payment in 
addition to any miles run. An example was 
given to the Board as follows: an engineer 
reporting for duty at 8.00 a.m. would, if 
released for a full hour during the day, 
commence drawing overtime payment at 
5.00 p.m. 

If that engineer were held on duty until 
7.00 p.m., two hours overtime would be 
paid at 12i miles per hour for a total of 
25 miles, and if during the same two hours 
between 5.00 and 7.00 p.m. the engineer 
ran a distance of 60 miles, payment of the 
60 miles would be made over and above 
payment required for the 25 miles overtime. 

It is submitted that if it can at all be 
avoided, an engineer would not be kept on 
overtime unless required to travel, and if he 
is required to travel, he receives a payment 
for the miles run together with overtime at 
the rate of 12± miles per hour for the 
length of overtime required by the Railway. 
In other words, the engineer who runs 60 
miles during two hours' overtime receives 
85 miles credit in wages, or an average in 
excess of 40 miles per hour. The present 
rule having to do with payment of overtime 
in this class of service, the Board was told, 
is a standard rule on the North American 
continent. 

Recommendation — In view of the fact 
that the engineer, when held for overtime 
service, if he doesn't run receives pay at 
the rate of 12£ miles per hour while not 
working, and if working receives pay for 
the miles run plus the overtime payment of 
12i miles per hour, the Board does not see 
fit to recommend that the Brotherhood's 
request be granted. 



160 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



5. Preparatory and Inspection Allowance 

This is a request for the deletion of Article 
3-A and 4-D of the Contracts, and thereby 
grant locomotive engineers preparatory and 
inspection time on all classes of service. 

According to the submissions made to the 
Board, arbitrary payments have never been 
made to engineers on electric locomotives, 
in electric car or motor car service or on 
diesel locomotives operated in short turn- 
around passenger service. It would seem to 
the Board that this proposal would institute 
arbitrary payments in certain types of serv- 
ice for duties which are largely non-existent. 

Recommendation — The Board does not 
see fit to recommend the Contract be 
changed to meet the Brotherhood's request 
in this regard. 

6. Statutory Holidays 

This request is that locomotive engineers in 
road service be paid for working on statutory 
holidays and in the same manner and to the 
same extent as the locomotive engineers in yard 
service are now paid. 

The locomotive engineers in yard service 
are generally assigned to an eight-hour day, 
five or six days a week, and paid on an 
hourly basis. Road service engineers are 
generally of two classes, passenger and 
freight. Because of the dual basis of pay, 
road service employees are in one sense 
piece workers, and earn various mileages 
per day, depending on their trip or assign- 
ment, and the Board is told that it is not 
uncommon for road service engineers to 
earn two or more basic day's pay in one 
day elapsed time. 

According to the Company's submission, 
the average number of hours worked per 
week for a locomotive engineer in 1960 in 
passenger service was 33 and in freight 
service 37.6. 

Statutory holidays in industrial trades are 
almost universal, and the reason for grant- 
ing them originally was to provide additional 
leisure without loss of pay, although it 
seems to be admitted that in some instances 
now, especially where companies must work 
on statutory holidays because of the require- 
ments of the operation, penalty payments 
for work on statutory holidays amount in 
effect to an increase in pay. 

The granting of statutory holidays to 
engineers in road service could not result 
in providing more leisure time for the loco- 
motive engineers, due to the fact that the 
nature of the industry is such that road 
engineers would not be released from duty 
on statutory holidays. It is true that road 
engineers can't as a rule have their leisure 
time on statutory holidays, and therefore 



can't enjoy these holidays with their friends, 
but at the same time, they do, on the 
average, have more leisure time than the 
average industrial worker. 

The Board is told that nowhere in Canada 
or in the United States do road service 
employees receive statutory holiday pay. 

Recommendation — In view of the fore- 
going, and the factors mentioned hereunder 
relating to increase in pay, and in view of 
the fact that to recommend payment for 
statutory holidays would be a completely 
new departure in North American railway 
practice, the Board is not prepared to 
recommend that this request of the Brother- 
hood be granted. 

7. Held at Away-from-home Terminal 

Unassigned locomotive engineers are now 
paid for all time held at away-from-home 
terminal after 16 hours, and under this request 
locomotive engineers are asking that they be 
paid for all time held at away-from-home 
terminal after 12 hours at the same rate as the 
last service performed. 

In assigned service, each run has a desig- 
nated time and day of departure both at 
home and away-from-home terminals, and 
lay-over varies considerably. Some are short 
and some last over 16 hours before the 
return trip begins. It is apparent that in 
many instances several basic days' pay may 
be earned from the time the engineer leaves 
home until he returns. 

There is a certain protection presently 
given to the engineers, because the present 
rule requires payment of a basic day for 
each 24-hour cycle held at an away-from- 
home terminal. 

The Brotherhood's proposal also calls for 
payment at the same rate as the last service 
performed, in place of the minimum pas- 
senger rate now paid. The Company submits 
that the minimum passenger rate provides 
adequate compensation, since no work or 
responsibility is involved in the lay-over 
time, and if the engineers have out-of-pocket 
expense during the lay-over time, they are 
allowed to deduct such expenses for income- 
tax purposes. 

Recommendation — The Board is of the 
opinion that this request would involve 
great cost and has come to the conclusion 
that the present rule is not unreasonable. 
However, since the Eastern agreement con- 
tains a provision for pay under certain 
circumstances while assigned engineers are 
held away from the home terminal, the 
Board is of the opinion that the present 
Eastern rule should be incorporated in the 
Western contract. The present Eastern rule 
reads as follows: 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



161 



"B" — Assigned Engineers Held Away-from- 
home Terminal 

Except in cases of wrecks, snow blockades or 
washouts on the sub-division to which they are 
assigned, engineers on assigned runs held 
away-from-homc terminals waiting their trains, 
delayed beyond the advertised time of depar- 
ture, will be paid for the time so held if more 
than seven hours. Seven hours or less not to 
count. If over seven hours, to be paid twelve 
and onehalf (12i) miles for each hour over 
the said seven hours at minimum passenger 
rates for the first eight (8) hours in each sub- 
sequent twenty-four (24) hours so held. Time 
to be submitted on a separate time return." 

8. Switching en Route 

This request is that locomotive engineers in 
through-freight service be paid for all time 
occupied in lifting and setting off cars en route. 

At the present time in through-freight 
service, when hours on duty exceed the 
miles run, engineers receive additional com- 
pensation for performing work en route by 
reason of the dual system of pay. Accord- 
ing to the Company's submission, the dual 
basis of pay in its present form was the 
result of a report of the Eight-Hour Com- 
mission, U.S.A., 1916, which led to the 
McAdoo Award (General Order 27) of 
1918. 

The Company also submits that the 
principles involved in this Award were 
adopted in Canada in 1919 in whole in the 
East but only in part in the West, and that 
this Award established the basic day of 100 
miles or less, 8 hours or less, and con- 
templated that in this wage structure, acts 
such as lifting or setting off cars en route, 
would be considered as part of the work 
covered by the basic day's pay, (Supplement 
24, to General Order 27). 

At the present time, when switching en 
route exceeds a certain number, the so-called 
conversion rule comes into play, and by 
reason of the switching the through-freight 
engineers get an extra rate. The Brother- 
hood's brief submits that while switching 
is going on, no route mileage is being 
covered and therefore no piece work is 
being done, and therefore the miles or 
hours rule is not being observed. 

This may to some extent be so, but the 
engineer is presently protected by the con- 
version rule. 

Recommendation — The Board does not 
see fit to recommend that this request be 
granted. 

9. Switching at Terminals and Turn-Around 
Points 

This is a request that engineers in road 
service, who are required to perform switching 
at terminals and turn-around points, be paid 
on a minute basis at yard rates for the time 
so occupied. 



The Brotherhood submits that this re- 
quest has been made necessary because of 
the increasing tendency on the part of the 
Company to require engineers on road 
service to perform yard switching, and 
that this has resulted in cancelling yard as- 
signments at some terminals, and further, 
has resulted in road engineers performing 
switching at a rate of aproximately 15% 
less than that paid locomative engineers 
in yard service. 

The Eastern agreement provides for pay- 
ment of all time occupied in switching at 
terminals on a minute basis at the rate 
applicable during the trip, but no provision 
is made for switching payments at turn- 
around points except under the conversion 
rue, and the Western agreement provides 
for payment for switching at terminals and 
turn-around points on a minute basis at the 
rate applicable to the road trip. The Brother- 
hood would thus seek to extend the Western 
rule to the East and introduce yard rates 
into road service. 

While this report does contain certain 
recommendations for rule changes, which 
would make the rules prevailing in the 
East and West comparable, it does not 
purport to generally deal with the problem 
of recommending uniform rules for the 
East and West on a comprehensive basis. 
It is the Board's view that while it is 
desirable, it can be better dealt with by 
the Company and the Brotherhood during 
the existence of a contract, where the 
cost and all the pros and cons of the 
desirability of uniformity of rules can be 
dealt with in a leisurely fashion, free from 
the urgencies of bargaining for a collective 
contract. 

Recommendation — For these reasons the 
Board does not see fit to make any recom- 
mendations with respect to this Brother- 
hood request. 

10. Rest on Road 

Locomotive engineers in road service be 
permitted to book rest en route after eight 
hours on duty. 

According to the Brotherhood's submis- 
sions, the exacting nature of a locomotive 
engineer's duties being such that he must 
at all times be alert for signals such as 
order boards, lock signals, station protec- 
tion signals, slow train signals, flagmen, 
etc., and must closely observe all orders 
and speed restrictions, he needs a right to 
book rest after eight hours in cases where 
he feels fatigued. 



162 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



The Brotherhood points out that a loco- 
motive engineer is required to sit at his 
locomotive with his feet on the deadman 
control and be ever alert and watchful of 
his engine and train, and at the same time 
be on the lookout for all kinds of signals 
as well as watching his train for difficulties, 
and that when he has completed an eight- 
hour tour of such exacting duty, he has 
earned the right to a rest period. 

On the other hand, the Company points 
out that the present rule provides for 
taking rest en route after having been on 
duty 12 hours, and that in all classes of 
service the rules provide for men to be 
judges of their own condition and that even 
with the present 12-hour rule, in some 
instances employees have booked rest for 
reasons other than fatigue. 

The Company points out that many em- 
ployees, on arriving at a terminal after 
having been on duty for several hours, 
don't book rest as they are entitled to do 
under the rules, but start the home bound 
trip again, thus "doubling the road", in 
railroad parlance, and in some cases the 
elapsed time without rest may total from 
14 to 16 hours. 

The Company also points out that in- 
stances are common where the Brother- 
hood's representatives have requested the 
Company's management to adjust regular 
assignments so that the employees may be 
able to double back at the turn-around 
point. The Company asserts that if the 
Brotherhood's request were granted, it 
would have the effect of curtailing the opera- 
tion of trains over two sub-divisions. 

The Company further submits that the 
modern diesel is equipped with every con- 
fort and convenience, namely, cabs are 
weather tight and maintain an even tem- 
perature, and the engineer's seat is com- 
fortable and controls are all conveniently 
located, and that he has very little physical 
work to perform. The Company says further 
that in the days of steam power, engineers 
were content to work under the 12-hour 
rest rule. 

It is commonly known that while some 
industrial trades provide that overtime is 
optional on the part of the employee, most 
industrial trades require certain overtime to 
be worked if scheduled by the Company. In 
railroad work the engineer sometimes com- 
pletes a trip in less than eight hours and 
in many such instances the Company does 
not have the right to put him to work to fill 
out the full eight-hour period. In many 
instances the employee works less than 
eight hours on a trip, and in other instances 
he may work more. 



The Board of Transport Commissioners 
is empowered to limit or regulate the hours 
of duty of engineers, with a view to the 
safety of the public and of the employees. 
If it became apparent to the Brotherhood, 
that in many instances the requirement stat- 
ing that engineers may be called upon to 
work 12 hours without booking rest is con- 
trary to the safety of the public and of 
the employees, representations can be 
properly made to the Board of Transport 
Commissioners for a change. 

Recommendation — To change a rule to 
allow an employee to book rest at his own 
discretion after eight hours work, might 
very seriously interfere with the Company's 
operations, and until the Brotherhood can 
bring forward more specific instances of 
undue fatigue being encountered by reason 
of the necessity, at times, of the engineers 
remaining on duty for 12 hours, the Board 
does not see fit to recommend any such 
drastic change as the Brotherhood requests. 

11. Insurance 

The Brotherhood requests that the life of 
every locomotive engineer be insured while on 
duty for $10,000 and the premium to be paid 
by the Company, and in support of this request, 
it alleges that the work performed by the 
locomotive engineer is of a hazardous nature. 

While it is true that the engineer's work 
might become very hazardous if he is not 
constantly alert, it would appear that the 
mortality rates in various occupations do 
not indicate that the mortality rate of 
engineers was higher than the rate of other 
classes of employees as shown by the 
British insurance companies' mortality rates 
in various occupations. 

There was nothing brought forward to 
indicate that underwriting accident insur- 
ance for locomotive engineers would cost 
more than normal rates for such accident 
underwriting in other occupational classi- 
fications. The Company points out that 
the premium cost to the Company, if the 
request were granted, would be in the 
neighbourhood of $325,000, and that no 
other group of Company employees is 
covered by insurance while on duty, at 
the Company's expense. 

Recommendation — This is a cost item, 
and the Board is of the opinion that there 
is no justification for it based on the allega- 
tion that the engineer's occupation is ex- 
tremely hazardous, and therefore it does not 
recommend that this request be granted. 

12. Steam-generator Cars 

The request is that locomotive engineers 
be paid 35 cents per 100 miles for each steam 
generator car handled when attached to the 
locomotive. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY J 962 



163 



The steam-generator car is a unit which 
uses generators to produce steam heat for 
railway passenger equipment. The unit is 
coupled directly behind the locomotive, 
sometimes further back. There are steam 
generator units housed in A and B type 
diesel passenger locomotive, and engineers 
handling A and B type passenger diesels 
so equipped are not paid extra because of 
that fact. 

In August, 1960, an agreement was 
reached with the Brotherhood whereby a 
locomotive engineer in road service would 
be paid 35 cents per ticket for each steam 
generator unit coupled in the locomotive 
consist for any portion of the trip. As the 
Board understands it, this memorandum 
agreement referred only to payment to 
locomotive engineers on the Atlantic and 
Central Regions of 35 cents per trip for 
each steam generator car attached to his 
locomotive. 

While it may be that the steam generator 
cars are not strictly a part of the locomotive 
or necessary in any way for its operation, 
by reason of the change-over to diesel 
locomotives, separate steam generators had 
to be provided to supply heat to passenger 
trains. Formerly the heat for passenger 
trains was provided from the steam loco- 
motive. 

Recommendation — The Board recom- 
mends that the Memorandum of Agree- 
ment now operating with respect to the 
Central and Atlantic Regions be extended 
to the Western Regions, and that the 
engineer, instead of receiving an additional 
35 cents per trip for each such steam gen- 
erator attached to his locomotive, receive 
40 cents per trip for the first steam gen- 
erator attached to the locomotive and 35 
cents per trip for each subsequent steam 
generator attached to his locomotive consist. 

13. Deadheading 

The Brotherhood's request is that Article 61 
of the Atlantic and Central Regions schedule 
covering deadhead movement apply to the 
Western Region. 

The term deadheading describes the 
travel of the engineers from one point to 
another for the purpose of performing ser- 
vice at some other point, and returning to 
the home terminal after work at the away- 
from-home point is completed. The Eastern 
deadhead rule reads as follows: 

"Article 16. A — Deadheading 
Deadheading or travelling passenger on rail- 
way business with the proper authority will be 
paid for as follows 

(1) Deadheading paid separately from service 
will be computed on the basis of miles or 
hours whichever is the greater, with a 



minimum of one hundred (100) miles, 
overtime pro rata, at the minimum rate 
applicable to the train on which the 
engineer travels. 

(2) When deadheading is coupled with service 
paid for at road rates, such deadheading 
time and any dead time will be taken into 
account with the time occupied in other 
service when computing overtime, and the 
time or mileage will be paid for at the 
highest rate applicable to any class of 
service performed with a minimum of one 
hundred (100) miles. 

(3) When deadheading is coupled with service 
paid for at yard rates, such deadheading 
time and any dead time will be paid for 
separately for the time occupied in yard 
service, miles or hours whichever is the 
greater. If deadheading is performed on 
a passenger train it will be considered as 
passenger service, and if on a freight 
train as freight service." 

Deadhead rule in the Western Regions 
reads as follows: 

6.10 — Deadheading 

(a) Deadheading on Company's orders will be 
paid actual miles at minimum passenger 
rate, actual miles or hour to count, figured 
from time ordered for to time of arrival 
(Minimum Day except in case of con- 
tinuous service). 

(b) Deadhead time will not be paid to men 
going to or coming from outside points 
when the movement is due to relief being 
furnished engineers in accordance with 
mileage regulations or as a result of the 
application of the 5-day work week in 
yard service. 

(c) Deadhead time will not be paid when 
moving from one home terminal to 
another home terminal in the exercise of 
seniority. 

The Western rule provides that engineers 
when deadheading are paid at minimum 
passenger rates regardless of whether the 
deadhead service is performed on freight 
trains or passenger trains. 

The Brotherhood submits that the num- 
ber of passenger trains operating is steadily 
being reduced, and that accordingly more 
deadheading must be performed on freight 
trains with the length of time required to 
complete the trip increased, and the request 
is that locomotive engineers required to 
deadhead will be paid at the minimum rate 
applicable to the train on which the dead- 
head is performed. 

Recommendation — The Board is of the 
opinion that the benefit of the Eastern rule 
should be applied in the West now without 
waiting for a comprehensive review of East 
and West rules taking place. 

14. Final Terminal Time 

The request is that Article 7 of the Atlantic 
and Central Region schedule apply to 
Western Region. 



164 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



According to the Brotherhood submis- 
sions, the Western Region locomotive engi- 
neers have operated under a very brief 
rule which designates payment for final 
terminal delay, and disputes have arisen and 
local agreements have been drawn up to 
take care of the local disputes, and the 
Brotherhood says that with the installation 
of centralized traffic control and the build- 
ing of new electronic hump yards, it is 
more difficult to sensibly apply the Western 
rule. 

The Eastern-agreement rule requires pay- 
ment of time-and-a-half for overtime, but 
the Western-agreement rule does not. It 
would appear that time-and-a-half has never 
applied in the Western agreement, and 
under the McAdoo award, old rules, ex- 
cept those applying at initial and final 
terminals, in conflict with payments of 
single time, were to be relinquished if the 
concessions which the award made, includ- 
ing time-and-a-half for overtime, were to 
be made effective in their entirety. 

This Brotherhood request, while having 
some merit, is tied up with the larger prob- 
lem of trying to work out an agreement 
satisfactory to the Company and the 
Brotherhood which will bring about uni- 
formity of East and West rules. 

Recommendation — The Board is of the 
opinion that this request is one which 
should be again considered, with the Com- 
pany and the Brotherhood each attempting 
to achieve uniformity in rules. 

15. Transportation 

This request is that locomotive engineers 
relieved at a point other than that from which 
they started the day's work, will be furnished 
transportation and returned to starting point, 
and will be considered as in continuous service 
until the arrival at such starting point. 

In support of the request for this rule, 
the engineers submit that since they are 
usually furnished with lockers at the point 
where they report for duty, they leave their 
street clothes in the lockers while on duty, 
and if they travel to starting point in a 
car they leave the car nearby, and so on 
completion of the trip at the end of the 
day's work, they must return to the point 
from which they started to get their clothes 
and their car. 

The Brotherhood says that in many 
large terminals there is more than one 
place where a locomotive engineer may be 
required to report for duty, and frequently 
the engineer is required to get his engine 
at point A and on the return trip to deliver 
the locomotive at point B, sometimes 10 



or 15 miles apart. The engineer is then re- 
quired to travel by public transportation 
available back to the point of starting in 
order to secure his clothing, and the 
Brotherhood submits that often transporta- 
tion is not available. 

It would appear that while the Brother- 
hood's request does not definitely say so, 
this request has mostly to do with engineers 
working in yard service. From the Com- 
pany's point of view it would appear that 
the rule as requested would be impractic- 
able, because the work is often done in 
many small yards and sometimes the work 
of successive crews involves moving from 
one part of the terminal to another, or from 
one yard to another, and such crews fre- 
quently come on duty at one point and are 
off duty at another. 

The Company submits that if it had to 
meet all the contingencies connected with 
the proposal, and return employees at the 
end of the shift to the point where they 
went on duty, each locomotive might be 
involved in unproductive service. It would 
appear that the importance of this request 
arises because of the situations which may 
exist in large terminals such as Montreal, 
Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver. The 
Company says that the difficulties which 
the Brotherhood envisages can best be taken 
care of by local arrangements. 

Recommendation — The Board is of the 
opinion that the Company's view of this 
is the correct one, but it is also of the 
opinion that where employees come on 
duty at one place and off duty at another 
some distance away, it should be the 
responsibility of the Company, in the event 
that public transportation is not readily 
available, to provide transportation for em- 
ployees back to their starting point. 

16. Work Train Guarantee 

The Brotherhood wants Article 5.5 of the 
Western Region to read as follows: "Engineers 
assigned to work-train service will be allowed 
one day for each 24 hours so held, whether at 
or away from home terminal, except as 
otherwise provided in Article 5.8." 

The Western Region agreement now pro- 
vides for a guarantee payment when the 
engineer assigned to work-train service is 
held at an away-from-home terminal, but 
when an engineer assigned to a work-train 
service is held at his home terminal, there 
is no guarantee payment provided for him. 
The Brotherhood's request is that since 
the engineer is held he should have a 
guarantee payment apply at the home termi- 
nal as well as at the away-from-home 
terminal. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



165 



This points up still another difference 
between the schedules in the Eastern and 
Western agreements. The Company says 
that the rule was designed to reimburse 
engineers on work-train service for out-of- 
pocket expense when away from their home 
terminal. 

Recommendation — This, in the Board's 
view, is another rule request which should 
be considered when the Company and 
Brotherhood get around to working out an 
arrangement to achieve uniformity between 
the rules of the East and West, and the 
Board therefore does not at the present 
time recommend any change in this rule. 

17. Other Positions — Seniority Rights 

This request has to do with the desire of 
the Brotherhood to be able to have engineers 
retain their rights on the seniority lists and be 
granted leave of absence if the Brotherhood 
asks that they be granted leave of absence. 

The Brotherhood would have the Eastern 
rule read: "Engineers accepting a position 
of salaried chairman or other position with 
the Brotherhood or an official position with 
the Railway, shall be granted leave of 
absence if required, and retain their sen- 
iority rights", and the rule the Brotherhood 
desired in the Western Region schedule, 
"Engineers accepting official positions in 
the Company service or employed by the 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers will 
be granted leave of absence if required and 
retain their rights on the seniority list." 

At the present time the rule in the West 
reads as follows: 

"Engineers accepting official positions in the 
Company service or employed by the B. of 
L.E. will retain their rights on the Seniority 
List." 

And the rule in the East reads as follows: 

"Engineers accepting a position of salaried 
chairman or other position with the Brother- 
hood or an official position with the Railway 
Company shall retain their seniority rights." 

Recommendation — The Board is of the 
opinion that this rule should be re-drafted 
and made uniform as between East and 
West, and that it should be written in 
such a way as to give leave of absence to 
full-time Brotherhood employees who are 
engaged in servicing the collective agree- 
ment between the parties. Notwithstanding 
the fact that the Company may feel that 
it has a right to refuse leave of absence 
under the terms of the present agreement, 
the Board also is of the opinion that, if 
as the Brotherhood asserts, the Company 
has refused leave of absence of the Brother- 
hood employee by the name of F. C. Lutes, 



who has been on leave of absence as a 
special representative of the Brotherhood 
for 11 years, this leave of absence should 
be granted provided Mr. Lutes, while em- 
ployed with the Brotherhood is doing ex- 
actly the same work as he has been doing 
for the last 11 years while he has been on 
leave of absence. 

18. Homes — Compensation for Moving 

This request is that when a locomotive 
engineer is forced to move away from his home 
terminal, to exercise his seniority to enable him 
to work because of Management's desire to 
run trains through two subdivisions or through 
existing home terminals, or through former turn- 
around points, that such engineer should be 
compensated by the Company for the moving of 
his household effects, and further, should be 
compensated for monetary loss arising from the 
forced sale of his home. 

This whole knotty question of whether or 
not employees should be compensated in 
circumstances where, because of changing 
working conditions, they may be required 
to move to other towns or localities, if 
they are to keep their jobs, has now 
reached the discussion stage in the Canadian 
Parliament. Recently the Minister of Trans- 
port announced to the House that this 
whole question will be referred to a parlia- 
mentary committee at the next session for 
investigation and report. The matter that 
the Brotherhood raises in this request is a 
most complicated one, and could be ex- 
tremely costly if the Brotherhood's request 
were granted. On the other hand, there are 
many arguments which the Brotherhood has 
advanced to show that in some circum- 
stances, the employee's plight when forced 
to move because of operational changes, 
should to some extent and in some way be 
alleviated by some form of compensation. 

Recommendation — In view of what has 
been stated above, because this whole matter 
will shortly be considered by parliamentary 
committee, the Board does not see fit to 
make any recommendation with respect to 
this request. 

19. Basic Rates of Pay 

This will be dealt with at the end of 
this report. 

20. Preparatory Time 

The request is that locomotive engineers be 
allowed thirty minutes preparatory time for 
one unit, plus ten minutes for each additional 
unit in the locomotive consist, and in support 
of its request the Brotherhood reviewed before 
the Board all of the work which the engineer 
is required to perform before starting out with 
his engine. 



166 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



The board has before it a request for 
elimination of the preparatory time arbit- 
rary, and this request amounts to an ex- 
tension of the preparatory time arbitrary. 

Recommendation — In view of the recom- 
mendations dealing with this section of the 
Company's request relating to arbitraries, 
suffice it to say that the Board does not 
see fit to recommend the change the 
Brotherhood desires with respect to in- 
creasing preparatory time arbitrary. 

21. Long Runs 

The Brotherhood's request that two engineers 
be employed on all runs over 200 miles in 
either freight or passenger service. 

The Brotherhood says that by reason of 
the time made in operating more than 200 
miles, the engineer, who is required to 
remain in a fixed position sometimes for 
a period of 6 hours or more, and at the 
same time be completely alert for all signals, 
orders, etc., is working under severe mental 
and physical strain. The Brotherhood says 
the engineer is not able to stretch his legs, 
walk around the car, nor have a meal, and is 
not even able to rest his eyes, and further, it 
requests that if runs are more than 200 
miles, they should be manned by a second 
locomotive engineer. 

The Company, on the other hand, says 
that this request is simply an attempt on 
the part of the Brotherhood to prohibit, 
or at least limit, the Company's desire to 
run through two sub-divisions. The Com- 
pany asserts that in the days of steam power, 
a day's run for a steam engine was 100 to 
125 miles, and round-house facilities were 
thus spaced this distance apart, but that 
since diesel power does not require frequent 
servicing, it may be run 300 miles or more 
without being fuelled. It is submitted by 
the Company that at the present time some 
engineers operate assignments on sub-divi- 
sions in excess of 100 miles in length, and 
for their own convenience double back with 
little or no rest at the turn-around, thus 
accumulating up to 300 miles without 
booking rest. 

It is also submitted by the Company that 
many of the runs which exceed 200 miles 
are sometimes preferred by the employees 
because the assignments have regular start- 
ing time, and this helps the employees to 
arrange sufficient rest before starting on 
their trips. 

Recommendation — The Board is of the 
view that since no specific examples of un- 
due fatigue being experienced by engineers 
who are required to run in excess of 200 
miles have been brought to the attention 



of the Board, and since this matter is related 
to the matter of hours on duty before book- 
ing rest, which has already been dealt with, 
the Board is of the opinion that it should 
not at this time make any recommendation 
in favour of this request. 

Company's Proposals 

The Company's first proposal reads as 
follows: 

1. Atlantic, St. Lawrence & Great Lakes 
Regions, Excluding Newfoundland Area 

Eliminate all references to arbitrary allow- 
ances (Preparatory Time — Articles 3-A, 7-C, 
8-C; Inspection Time— Articles 4-D, 7-H, 8-E; 
Change-off Allowances on Locomotives 
operating through Terminals — Articles 3-B, 
7-D; Allowance when Work Trains Tied Up 
Away from Terminal — Article 11-B; Housing 
and Taking Locomotives Out — Article 18) and 
provide that locomotive engineers in all 
classes of service will be compensated on the 
actual minute basis from the time required to 
report for duty. Such time to be paid for at 
pro rata rates and used to the extent necessary 
to make up the basic day. 

Prairie and Mountain Regions 

Eliminate all references to arbitrary allow- 
ances (Preparatory Time — Articles 2.8, 3.8, 
4.10, 5.3; Inspection Time— Articles 2.12, 3.15, 
4.12, 5.4; Change-off Allowances on Locomo- 
tive Operating through Terminals — Articles 2.9, 
2.12, 3.9 3.15; Article 5.4; Housing and Taking 
Engine Out — Article 6.22) and provide that 
locomotive engineers in all classes of service 
will be compensated on the actual minute basis 
from the time required to report for duty. Such 
time to be paid for at pro rata rates and used 
to the extent necessary to make up the basic 
day. 

This proposal has to do with the elimina- 
tion of arbitrary allowances. 

It will be recalled that the Brotherhood 
had requested certain increases with rela- 
tion to arbitrary allowances. The arbitrary 
allowances are payments to which engineers 
are entitled for certain periods of time be- 
fore the commencement of the trip and 
at the end of the trip, and for certain time 
when engines run through terminals. 

The Company submits that the situation 
on its railroad is parallel to that existing 
on the Canadian Pacific Railway and that 
certain arbitrary allowances have been 
changed on the Canadian Pacific Railway, 
and that the changes have been in force 
for some considerable time. The Kellock 
Commission dealt with arbitrary allowances, 
and in general made certain recommenda- 
tions after coming to the conclusion that 
the agreements concerning arbitraries should 
be dropped, and that the collective agree- 
ment should be amended to provide for 
payment for the time required for the per- 
formance of the actual service. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



167 



The Brotherhood submits that because 
the arbitraries have been in existence for 
a considerable number of years, they must 
now be considered as part of the wage 
structure and that to change the allowances 
for arbitraries would in effect be changing 
the wage structure. 

Recommendation 

Road Service — Since certain arbitraries 
have been changed on the C.P.R. and the 
Northern Alberta Railway, the Board is 
of the opinion that certain arbitrary allow- 
ances should be changed, and that the new 
agreement be made to conform to those 
presently in force on the C.P.R. and N.A.R. 

The Board therefore recommends that 
effective as of January 1, 1962, in road ser- 
vice there be 15-minute preparatory and 
inspection time, and that the arbitraries for 
the forthcoming contract should be made 
to conform to those presently in force on 
the Canadian Pacific Railway and the North- 
ern Alberta Railway. 

1. Shop Preparatory. The Board recom- 
mends that effective as of and from January 

1. 1962, the shop preparatory time be re- 
duced from 30 to 15 minutes. 

2. Run-Through Preparatory. The Board 
recommends that 15 minutes be allowed for 
run-through preparatory. This means that 
there is no change recommended in the 
Eastern agreement, but that in the Western 
agreement the change means that the run- 
through preparatory time is to be reduced 
from 45 to 15 minutes. 

3. Shop Final Inspection. The Board re- 
commends that this time be 15 minutes. 
This means a reduction from 20 to 15 
minutes in the Eastern agreement and from 
45 to 15 minutes in the Western agreement. 

4. Run-Through Inspection. The Board re- 
commends that this be 15 minutes. This is 
a reduction from 45 to 15 minutes in the 
Western agreement and no change to the 
Eastern agreement. 

Yard Service — The Board recommends 
10 minutes preparatory time in yard service, 
and 10 minutes final inspection time. This 
is reduced from the previous allowance 
of from 15 minutes for preparatory and 15 
minutes for final inspection in yard ser- 
vice. Such reduced time allowances for the 
above arbitraries will be paid for at pro- 
rata rates and used to the extent necessary 
to make up the basic day. 

Work Train Service — The allowance upon 
completion of a day's work when tied up at 
away-from-home terminal or at-home termi- 
nals, will be reduced to 15 minutes. 



2. Atlantic, St. Lawrence & Great Lakes 
Regions Excluding Newfoundland Area 

Revise to read: 

Definition of a Separate Run: Engineers used 
out of or at initial or final terminal to per- 
form service other than that in connection with 
their train, before commencing or after com- 
pleting trip, will be allowed a separate day for 
such work. It is understood that on branch 
runs, or at terminals where no yard engine (s) 
is on duty, road engineers may be required 
to do yard switching, and will be considered as 
in continuous service. Passenger crews will not 
be required to do freight switching. 

The present rule simply says that engi- 
neers used out of or at initial or final 
terminal to perform service other than in 
connection with the trip for which they 
were called, before commencing or after 
completing such trip, will be allowed a 
separate day for such work .... 

The Company's request for this revision, 
if granted, means that engineers used out 
of or at initial or final terimnals, would 
have to perform service in connection with 
their own train. This proposal should be 
considered along with Company proposal 
No. 3, which reads as follows: 

3. Article 7 — Atlantic, St. Lawrence & 
Great Lakes Regions, Excluding Newfound- 
land Area. 

Revise to read as follows: 
G — Release at Final Terminal: 

Engineers on arrival at objective terminal 
after performing switching required in con- 
nection with their own train and putting their 
train away (including caboose) will be con- 
sidered released from duty. Should they be 
required to perform other work when yard 
engines are on duty or to make short runs 
out of the terminal they will be paid one 
hundred (100) miles for such service. It is 
understood that where no yard engine is on 
duty road engineers will do yard switching 
and will be considered as in continuous service. 

Proposal No. 2 would remove the limita- 
tion in the rule at present that prohibits road 
crews in passenger service from doing 
switching in connection with their own 
train, and proposal No. 3 would remove a 
similar limitation having to do with freight 
service. 

At present the rule doesn't even permit 
road crews to make switches in connection 
with their own train to the extent of putting 
away their own caboose at the final termi- 
nal if a yard engine is on duty. 

The Company urged the Board to rec- 
ommend the revision suggested in the inter- 
ests of efficiency, and submits that because 
there is no functional difference between the 
road and yard work, that its services should 
not be separated by an iron curtain by 
some specific place or location of work 
alone. 



168 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



On the other hand, the Brotherhood sub- 
mits that to require passenger engineers to 
perform yard switching, even with their own 
train, after the arrival of their train at its 
final terminal, would mean that the carrier 
could hold an engineer on duty for hours 
after completing his trip, and that such 
work would be performed at the yard- 
switching rate of some 25 per cent less 
than the locomotive engineers in assigned 
yard service receive. Also, because present 
Article 7(g) gives complete flexibility where 
switching is required at terminals where no 
yard engine is on duty, there is no need to 
hold engineers for this purpose, and 
if he were so held he would be performing 
work after he has yarded his train at a 
rate of some 15 per cent less than that 
of locomotive engineers in yard service. 

Recommendation — In view of the fact 
that the Company's request is limited to 
the right to ask engineers to perform switch- 
ing connected with their own train, the 
Board is of the view that the Brotherhood's 
criticism of the request is not fully justi- 
fied. In view of the increases in pay herein 
later recommended, the Board recommends 
that this request of the Company be granted. 

4. Article 2 — Atlantic, St. Lawrence & 
Great Lakes Regions, Excluding Newfound- 
land Area 
Revise to read: 

F— Called for Straight-Away or Turn-Around 
Service: 

1. Engineers will be notified when called 
whether for straight-away or turn-around 
service and will be compensated accord- 
ingly. Such notification will not be 
changed after leaving the initial terminal 
unless necessitated by circumstances which 
could not be foreseen at time of call such 
as accident, locomotive failure, washout, 
snow blockade, or where the line is 
blocked. 

2. Engineers may be called for turn-around 
service only when the distance from the 
initial terminal to the turn-around point is 
one hundred (100) miles or less. 

Article 7 — Atlantic, St. Lawrence & Great 
Lakes Regions, Excluding Newfoundland Area 

Revise to read: 

A — (3) Engineers will be notified when called 
whether for straight-away or turn-around 
service and will be compensated accord- 
ingly. Such notification will not be changed 
after leaving the initial terminal, unless 
necessitated by circumstances which could 
not be foreseen at time of call such as 
accident, locomotive failure, washout, 
snow blockade or where the line is 
blocked. 

A — (4) Engineers may be called for turn- 
around service only when the distance 
from the initial terminal to the turn- 
around point is one hundred (100) miles 
or less. 



The Board was advised by the Company 
that it understood that the above request 
had been accepted in principle by the 
Brotherhood, but the Brotherhood said be- 
fore the Board that the request had not been 
accepted. 

It would appear further that this matter 
is one which is best capable of satisfactory 
solution if it is resolved in direct negotiation 
between the parties. 

Recommendation — For these reasons the 
Board does not see fit to make any recom- 
mendation in connection with the above 
request. 

5. Article 9 — Atlantic, St. Lawrence & 
Great Lakes Regions, Excluding Newfound- 
land Area 

D — Switching at Terminals and En Route: 
Engineers coming in from snow plow trips 
will not be required to do any switching 
at terminals, except to put their own train 
away if no yard engine is immediately 
available. At points en route, engineers 
will not do any switching except when 
necessary to move cars in order to plow 
out a track or tracks, or to spot rush 
cars, unless plowing has been discontinued 
and the plow is being handled dead. 

The present rule reads as follows: 

"Engineers coming in from snow plow 
trip will not be required to do any 
switching at terminals except to put their 
own train away if no yard locomotive is 
immediately available. At points en route 
engineers will not do any switching, 
except when necessary to move cars in 
order to plow out a track or tracks." 

The Company in its submission states 
that with the advent of diesel, the snow- 
plow train crews are no longer confronted 
with a condition in which they are wet and 
uncomfortable when they return from a 
trip, and that the Company should be 
allowed certain versatility at certain times 
in the use of the snow-plow engineer. It 
also points out that the Western crews 
already perform the service that the amend- 
ment to the Eastern contract would allow 
the Company to require the Eastern engi- 
neers to perform. 

On the other hand, the Brotherhood sub- 
mits that many diesel locomotives have 
poorly fitting doors and poorly-fitting 
weather stripping, and that as a result 
thereof, the snow conditions in engines 
operating in snow-plow service are not much 
better than formerly. 

The Brotherhood also states that the rule 
was tested by the Brotherhood in Canadian 
Railway Board of Adjustment case No. 708, 
in which the carrier claimed the right to, 
and did force, the locomotive engineers to 
haul trains from the turn-around point back 
to the initial terminal. Further, the Brother- 
hood stated the Board had ruled that the 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



169 



Company was in error and upheld the 
contention of the employees that such 
practice was improper, and that to require 
enigneers, who are often subjected to a 
thorough wetting in handling the plows, to 
keep on working in switching a train and 
hauling it over the road, would mean they 
would have to work with the windows open 
in severe weather at a time when their 
clothes are wet. 

Recommendation — While the Board has 
some sympathy with the Company's anxiety 
to increase the versatility of the engineers, 
as the granting of this request would, this 
request is another one seeking a rule change 
which should be dealt with when a com- 
prehensive review of the rules takes place 
in direct discussions between the parties. 

6. Article 15 — Atlantic, St. Lawrence & 
Great Lakes Regions, Excluding Newfound- 
land Area 

Revise to read as follows: 
A — Attending Locomotives and Steam-Genera- 
tor Units: Engineers called to attend 
locomotives or steam-generator units after 
termination of trip or day's work, will be 
allowed pay at the pro rata minimum 
freight rate per hour for all the time so 
occupied, with a minimum of two (2) 
hours. Time paid for under this rule shall 
not be used to make up the basic day. 

The Company asserts that the rule as 
it is at present was written to cover loco- 
motives under steam, and the Company now 
asks that the rule be made to fit the needs 
of its operations. 

The minimum time to be paid for call- 
out under its suggested rule, the Company 
states, is two hours. 

During cold weather, it appears that a 
"watchman heater" on the locomotive some- 
times requires attention to prevent the water 
from freezing in the cooling system, and 
that when the "watchman heater" doesn't 
function properly, an alarm sounds, and 
the horn blows until the correction is made, 
and this horn is usually answered by the 
engineer, whose sleeping quarters are usually 
close to the place where the alarm sounds. 

The Brotherhood asserts that since the 
advent of diesel locomotives, engines which 
tied up at outlying points are left untended 
from the time the engineer goes off duty 
until he reports for duty at the commence- 
ment of his next day's work. In the days of 
the steam locomotive, engine watchmen 
were assigned to look after steam loco- 
motives not in charge of a locomotive engi- 
neer, and the Brotherhood submits that 
under Article 29 of the engineers' schedule, 
since the regularly assigned engineer is com- 
pletely released from duty from the end 



of the trip, or day's work, until again re- 
quired for his regular assignment, that he 
should not be called upon to answer the 
"watchman heater" alarm, or if the Com- 
pany does feel that the engineers should be 
called upon, they should be paid the mini- 
mum payment of the daily guarantee for 
passenger service. 

Recommendation — It is the Board's 
view that the rule should be amended to 
read as follows: 

Engineers called to attend locomotive or 
steam-generator units after the termination of 
trip or day's work will be allowed pay at the 
pro rata minimum freight rate per hour for 
all time so occupied with a minimum of four 
(4) hours for each call. Time paid under this 
rule shall not be used to make up the basic 
day. 

In other words, the Board's view is that 
a four-hour call-out is more realistic, hav- 
ing regard to practice in industry, than the 
two-hour call-out as suggested by the Com- 
pany. 

7. Article 58 — Atlantic, St. Lawrence & 
Great Lakes Regions, Excluding Newfound- 
land Area 

Health and Welfare— Substitute $4.82 for 
$4.87. 

Article 6.16 — Prairie and Mountain Regions 
Health and Welfare— Substitute $4.82 for 
$4.87. 

The Board is told that in the settlement 
with the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engi- 
neers in 1956, the engineers were granted 
$4.25 per month per employee performing 
any compensated service during the month 
in lieu of health and welfare plan, and in 
negotiations with the Brotherhood in 1959, 
it was agreed that the Company would in- 
crease the payments to engineers in lieu 
of health and welfare from that $4.25 to 
4.87 per month. 

The Board is now told that the premium 
for the non-operating employees health and 
welfare plan was again changed effective 
January 1, 1961, and that the employees' 
deductions and the Company's contributions 
were decreased from $4.87 to $4.82, and 
therefore the Board is requested to recom- 
mend a principle of equality in these pay- 
payments. 

Recommendation — The Board agrees that 
in Article 58, Atlantic, St. Lawrence and 
Great Lakes Regions and in Article 6.16, 
Prairie and Mountain Regions — Health and 
Welfare, the figures of $4.82 should be sub- 
stituted for the present $4.87. 






170 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY J 962 



8. Article 3.12 — Prairie and Mountain 
Regions 

Switching at Canadian National Railways 

Junction Points: Delete. 

The present Article reads as follows: 

"Through-freight rates on the basis of twelve 
and one-half (12£) miles per hour will be 
paid engineers in through-freight service for 
all time occupied in switching at Canadian 
National Railways junction points, and this 
time will be paid in addition to pay for the 
trip. Such time will be deducted in comput- 
in overtime for the trip, and this switching 
will not be regarded as constituting switch- 
ing at an intermediate point under Article 
3.19. Interrupted time of 30 consecutive 
minutes or more, preventing the continuance 
of switching operations, will be deducted in 
computing time for switching at Canadian 
National Railways junction points." 

The Company asserts that there is no 
counterpart in the Eastern agreement for 
this junction switching, and says that it 
provides for time within time and con- 
travenes the principle of the so-called Con- 
version Rule and thus it proposes its 
elimination. 

The Brotherhood, on the other hand, 
asserts that the dual system of pay is in- 
tended to be a piece-work system, and that 
when engineers in road service operate on 
a piece-work basis, then a mile covered 
represents a certain unit of work, and if 
an engineer is required to perform work 
on a wayside station, he is doing something 
less than hauling his train over a number 
of miles between the initial and final ter- 
minals, and thus is prevented from perform- 
ing work on a piece-work basis. Further, it 
asserts that the Conversion Rule only par- 
tially takes care of the difficulty which 
would be apparent if the Company's request 
were followed. The Brotherhood also states 
that the time occupied with junction switch- 
ing cannot be used in computing overtime. 

Recommendation — The Board is of the 
opinion that this is one of the rules which 
the parties should examine again between 
contract terms when their committees meet 
in an endeavour to make the Eastern and 
Western contracts uniform, or nearly 
uniform. 

9. Article 6.11 — Prairie and Mountain 
Regions 

Detention and Switching at Intermediate 
Terminals: Delete. 

The present Article reads: 

"Trains running over more than one sub- 
division, engineers will be paid all detention 
and switching at designated terminals 
between their initial and arriving points. 
"All time-table trains will be paid all time 
at terminals as per Articles 2.10, 6.11 and 
3.10, except that first ten (10) minutes will 
not be paid for when dead time is shown 
in time table." 



The Company says that this rule should 
be deleted because, like junction switching, 
it provides for payment of time within time, 
and is applicable to passenger service as 
well as freight service. The Brotherhood in 
reciting this request advanced the same argu- 
ments as have been recited in connection 
with the Company's request for deletion of 
the rule relating to junction switching. 

Recommendation — This again is one of 
the rules which should be considered be- 
tween the committees of the Brotherhood 
and the Railway when they meet to seek 
uniformity in the rules relating to the con- 
tract in the East and in the West. 

10. Article 32-A — Atlantic, St. Lawrence 
and Great Lakes Regions, excluding New- 
foundland Area. Article 6.50 — Prairie and 
Mountain Regions 

Sleeping Quarters: The Company will supply 
comfortable and sanitary sleeping quarters 
where reasonably required. Company-owned 
quarters will be equipped with spring beds, mat- 
tresses, blankets, sheets, towels, pillows and 
pillow cases, screen doors and windows, cook 
stoves and cooking utensils, free of charge. 
Lavatories and washroom facilities will be sup- 
plied where sewer connection is available. 
Sleeping quarters to be for the use of engine- 
men and trainmen and to be kept in good 
condition. 

The present rules relating to sleeping 
quarters are found in Article 32-A of the 
Eastern agreement and Article 6.50 of the 
Western agreement. The Company's pro- 
posal, if accepted, would eliminate two 
restrictions which the Company suggests 
are undesirable and not in keeping with 
modern conditions. The Company's pro- 
posal would eliminate the requirement that 
sleeping quarters be used for "enginemen 
only", and it would also allow the Company 
to utilize public sleeping accommodation 
where available instead of separate and 
Company-owned accommodation. 

The Brotherhood states that there is a 
very good reason why sleeping quarters are 
provided for enginemen only, that is, that 
on account of the unusual nature of an 
engineer's duties, as related to those of other 
employees or train-crew members, that the 
engineer be assured of having a place to 
rest which is suitable, not only in the phy- 
sical sense but also in an atmosphere which 
is compatible. The Brotherhood in fact says 
that since the locomotive engineer is sub- 
ject to take orders from the conductor, to 
require engineers to spend their off-duty 
hours with such persons would not tend 
for such good relationships. 

Recommendations — In the Board's view, 
while there may be some merit to the 
Brotherhood's contention, it feels that the 
Company should not be required, under 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



171 



modern conditions, to provide sleeping 
quarters for use of enginemen only, and 
that it also should have the right if it so 
desires, to provide sleeping accommodation 
from public sources, such as hotels, motels, 
etc., provided the lodging is of a suitable 
and sanitary type, and there is a certain 
degree of discrimination in a rule which 
provides that sleeping quarters should be 
provided separately for a certain class of 
Company employees. 

For these reasons, the Board would re- 
commend that the Company's request for 
a revised rule having to do with sleeping 
quarters be allowed. 

Rates of Pay 

The Brotherhood request is that basic 
rates of pay, arbitraries, and special allow- 
ances be increased by 15 per cent, and in 
support of its position, the Brotherhood 
lays great stress on its submission that the 
relative position of the wage rates of the 
engineers vis-a-vis those of wage earners 
of other sectors of the Canadian economy 
has deteriorated drastically since the pre- 
war period, and in the postwar period as 
well, and submits that the differentials 
earlier enjoyed should be restored. 

The Brotherhood submitted a great deal 
of material in support of this contention, 
that the increases in basic rates of locomo- 
tive engineers have lagged behind those of 
non-railway skilled workers, and submitted 
statistics which would indicate that the 
rates of locomotive engineers on the C.N.R. 
have increased between 116 and 171 per 
cent since 1939 and between 73 and 111 
per cent since 1946, while employees in non- 
railway skilled classifications have had 
their wage rates increased 269 per cent 
since 1939 and 147 per cent since 1946. 

Further, it submitted that the general 
wage rates in manufacturing have risen 288 
per cent since 1939 and 140 per cent since 
1946, while in durable goods manufacturing, 
the increase in the general wage rate has 
been 297 per cent since 1939 and 141 per 
cent since 1946, and that the over-all wage 
level in Canada as measured by the Gen- 
eral Index over-all average has risen 259 
per cent since 1939 and 131 per cent since 
1946. These figures are the October 1960 
figures, and from these submissions the 
Brotherhood argues that it would require a 
much higher increase than that asked to re- 
store the differentials even as they existed in 
1946. 

The comparisons just referred to affect 
basic rates of pay, and since locomotive 
engineers in freight and passenger service 
work on a piece-work system based on 



mileage, the Brotherhood submitted certain 
trends with relation to earnings rather than 
basic rates. 

In general, the Brotherhood submitted 
from the statistics that it filed, it should 
be concluded that the trend in C.N.R. 
engineers' average earnings has lagged be- 
hind the trend in durable-goods manufactur- 
ing since 1939. However, it is admitted by 
the Brotherhood that the figures since 1946 
show a somewhat different trend. 

In the durable goods industry as of 
January, 1961, compared with an index of 
100 for 1946, the average male earnings 
have increased to 248, whereas with pas- 
senger engineers the average hourly earn- 
ings in 1946 of 1.959 increased in 1960 to 
$4.94; for freight engineers in 1946, 1.448 
increased to $3.70, and yard engineers 1.136 
increased to $2.67, or an increase in this 
period of time for passenger engineers to 
252 (Index 100), for freight engineers to 
256 (Index 100) and to 233 (Index 100) 
for yard engineers. 

From this it is apparent that since 1946, 
the average hourly earnings of passenger 
and freight engineers have increased slightly 
more than the average hourly earnings of 
male wage earners in durable goods, while 
the average hourly earnings of yard engin- 
eers have increased only at a slightly lower 
rate than the average hourly earnings of 
male wage earners in durable goods. 

Productivity 

The Brotherhood also rests its case for 
an increase on the submission that the rates 
of earnings of locomotive engineers have 
not kept pace with the increase in produc- 
tivity of their labour, and submits that 
revenue traffic units per man hour worked 
by locomotive engineers have increased 77 
per cent between 1939 and 1960, including 
a 59 per cent rise since 1951, while at the 
same time hourly earnings have increased 
only 45.5 per cent since 1939. 

The Brotherhood then discusses the ques- 
tion as to who is responsible for the in- 
crease in productivity, and acknowledges 
that "dieselization" has unquestionably 
been a major factor in making a rapid rise 
in productivity possible, at the same time 
emphasizing its point that trains don't move 
by themselves and that heavier train loads 
produce a marked increase in productivity. 

The Brotherhood also suggests that yard 
automation will produce comparable in- 
creases in yard productivity to those already 
shown in road-service productivity. The 
Brotherhood frankly admits that there is 
no way to determine the extent to which 
each factor of production has contributed 



172 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



to this rise, but urges that engineers are 
entitled to a substantial increase in return, 
by reason of their contribution to increased 
productivity. 

The Board is of the view that productivity 
in industry or service is not directly trans- 
lated into increased earnings, and increased 
productivity does not in every case create 
increased ability to pay higher wages. 

There has been increased productivity in 
railway operations, but the experience of 
the railroad has been that by reason of the 
inroads of competitive forms of transporta- 
tion, the total freight-revenue ton-miles of 
all types of transportation in terms of 
constant dollars has increased at several 
times the rates of increase of freight revenue 
enjoyed by railways during the last 10 or 
12 years. 

The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engin- 
eers is vitally concerned with the continued 
operation of the railways; and while it is 
not capable of logical proof, the conclusions 
to a greater or lesser extent are inevitable 
(by reason of the competitive position of 
the railway mentioned) that increased 
labour costs force railways, wherever pos- 
sible, to decrease the number of employees. 

This tendency would doubtless go on 
anyway, whether wages were static or not, 
but substantial increase in wages accelerates 
the tendency to contract the size of the 
labour force. Therefore any increased labour 
costs which amount in railway operations 
to over 60 per cent of the revenue dollar, 
before being recommended, must be amply 
justified. 

In answer to the Brotherhood's submis- 
sion that substantial increases should be 
made to restore differentials, the Company 
says, and the statement has some substance, 
that settlements of previous contracts have 
been made without reference to restoration 
of differentials, and that this Board should 
not have added to it the responsibility of 
re-examining the merits of all settlements 
since 1939, and that the Brotherhood's 
urging that 1939 differentials should be re- 
stored is an obvious type of reasoning with 
necromantic overtones. 

The Company further says that percent- 
age wage adjustments for the purpose of 
maintaining differentials over a given period 
of time are not compatible with the func- 
tioning of a free economy, and that 
fundamental differences in characteristics 
as between individuals, industries operating 
in an economy rise and fall from time to 
time, and that there is no real good reason 
why in our economy, there should be any 
perpetuation of past relationship. 



It is understandable that the Brother- 
hood, who in 1939 enjoyed an enviable 
rank as far as wages were concerned in the 
economy, does not like to lose its position, 
but the Board is of the view that there 
is no good and valid reason why labour 
values in relation to other labour values 
must remain static in a non-static economy. 

Also, beyond that, if one uses 1939 or 
1946 or any other specific year as a basis 
for comparison, many factors would have 
to be known about the economy and the 
relative importance of various industries in 
the economy as compared to the relative 
importance now, before one would be in 
a position to even consider that a greater 
percentage rise in one section of the 
economy in wage rates is an indication of 
a depressed state of wages in another sec- 
tion of the economy showing a lesser in- 
crease. 

The Company points out that wage and 
fringe benefits' represented 62.5 per cent of 
every railway revenue dollar earned by the 
Canadian National in 1960, and therefore 
any additional wage costs are very burden- 
some, more so than to many other in- 
dustries. 

The Company submits that it should be 
important to the Brotherhood members to 
have the greatest possible stability in em- 
ployment, and that by their insistence upon 
large wage gains which have costly implica- 
tions the result will mean ultimate loss in 
employment for the engineers. 

The Company answers the Brotherhood 
argument that engineers' wage levels should 
reflect their extensive training, heavy re- 
sponsibility and inconvenience arising from 
the time spent away from home, by saying 
that mechanics, electricians, machinists, 
pipe fitters and many other trained people, 
serve long apprenticeships before enjoying 
journeymen's wages. Engineers, however, 
shortly after they have commenced employ- 
ment as firemen, receive the regular rate of 
pay for that classification and then move, 
after a period of three years' training, to 
become "classed" engineer. 

The Company further submits that with 
the advent of "dieselization" there has been 
no significant increase in skilled effort and 
responsibility, but on the other hand, the 
physical work and the skill in itself have 
been reduced while the responsibility has 
not greatly increased. 

The Company says that locomotive engi- 
neers are well paid, and that from the earn- 
ings data it now appears that 90.9 per cent 
of the engineers who worked during every 
pay period as locomotive engineers, earned 
in excess of $6,000.00, while 25.9 per cent 
earned more than $8,000.00, and further, 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



173 



the locomotive engineers in 1960 averaged 
$7,259.00 and that earnings show that loco- 
motive engineers are still among the aris- 
tocracy of employees in the Canadian 
economy. 

The engineers have had, since May 1956, 
the following increases: 

May, 1956 — 6 per cent 

November, 1956 — 2 " 
June 1, 1957 — 3 " " 

all based on rates in effect prior to May, 
1956. 

May, 1958 — 2 per cent 

February 16, 1959 — 3 " 

September 1, 1959 — 3 " 

May 1, 1960 — H " 

These increases from and including May 
1 were for Western engineers, and the 
Eastern engineers received increases of: 

2 per cent — May 1, 1958 

3 " " — March 1, 1959 

3 " " — September 1, 1959 
H " " — May 1, 1960. 

These increases were based on wages in 
effect April 30, 1958. So that in effect, 
since May 1, 1956, the engineers have re- 
ceived a total percentage increase of 20i 
per cent, a very substantial increase for the 
past five years. 

Cost of Living 

There has been a very modest increase 
in the Consumers' Index Cost of Living in 
the last two years, and in the period 1945 
to 1960 the Consumer Price Index increased 
70.7 per cent, whereas the engineers' com- 
pensation increases during the same period 
were substantially in excess of this. 

Current trends in wage settlements across 
the country show that with some exceptions, 
settlements in general industry have been 
averaging 4 to 5 cents per hour. 

The Company was able to establish, to 
the satisfaction of the Board, that there has 
been a serious decline in the railway share 
of transporting goods and persons across 
the country, and the Railway submitted to 
the Board that, in spite of efforts in either 
direction, the current year was going to 
show one of the largest operating deficits 
in the history of the Canadian National 
Railway. 

Increases to other Employees 

A very large group, in fact a high pro- 
portion of the total employees of the Rail- 
way, have recently received a substantial 
wage increase under a two-year contract. 



174 



While both the Company and the Brother- 
hood submit, and it is recognized, that the 
engineers bargain collectively for them- 
selves as a group, this Board cannot ignore 
the fact that the Company has paid sub- 
stantial increases under the contract re- 
cently completed with the non-operating 
employees. 

Recommendations — It is a difficult task 
for a Board to weight all the factors as 
submitted by the Company and the Brother- 
hood with respect to the application by the 
Brotherhood for an increase in wages, but 
the Board has carefully considered all the 
arguments for a substantial increase ad- 
vanced by the Brotherhood, and has also 
weighed the arguments of the Company in 
relation to what, if any, increase should 
be recommended, and is now prepared and 
does recommend as follows: 

Effective as of May 1, 1961, 1 per cent 
increase in basic rates of pay, arbitraries and 
special allowances based on rates in effect 
April 30, 1961. 

A further increase of 1 per cent effective 
November 1, 1961 on the same basis. 

A further increase in the first pay period 
following signing of the agreement of 1 per 
cent on the same basis. 

A further increase of 2 per cent on Novem- 
ber 1, 1962. 

A further increase of 11 per cent effective 
November 1, 1963. 

Contract to run from May 1, 1961 to 
April 30, 1964. All increases based on basic 
rates of pay, arbitraries and special allowances 
in effect April 30, 1961. 

When the increases above recommended 
are fully in effect, they will result in an 
increase in cents-per-hour earnings to pas- 
senger engineers of about 31.85 cents, to 
freight engineers about 24.05 cents, and to 
yard engineers about 17.55 cents. 

In addition to increases recommended 
above, the Board recommends that since the 
engineers, or a large proportion of them, 
will suffer some loss in income by reason 
of the reduction in arbitrary payments here- 
inbefore recommended, even after any ad- 
justments that may be made in running 
schedules are effective, that a settlement 
payment be made as soon as the accounting 
services of the Company can arrange such 
payment after the execution of the new 
contract, to each engineer, not exceeding 
$75.00 and payable on the following basis: 

(a) For service as engineer in each of the 
eight pay periods immediately preceding 
December 1, 1961 $75.00. 

(b) For service as engineer in seven of the 
eight pay periods immediately preceding 
December 1, 1961 $65.00. 

(c) For service as engineer in six of the eight 
pay periods immediately preceding Decem- 
ber 1, 1961 $55.00. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



(d) For service as engineer in five of the 
eight pay periods immediately preceding 
December 1, 1961 $45.00. 

(e) For service as engineer in four of the 
eight pay periods immediately preceding 
December 1, 1961 $35.00. 

(f) For service as engineer in three of the 
eight pay periods immediately preceding 
December 1, 1961 $25.00. 

(g) For service as engineer in two of the eight 
pay periods immediately preceding Decem- 
ber 1, 1961 $20.00. 

(h) Engineers who have performed service as 
engineer in less than two pay periods of 
the eight pay periods immediately pre- 
ceding December 1, 1961 Nil. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

(Sgd.) J. C. Anderson 
Chairman 

(Sgd.) T. R. Meighen 
Member 

DATED at Belleville, Ontario, the 28th 
day of November, 1961. 

MINORITY REPORT 

After having met with my colleagues on 
this Board, both in the conciliatory stages 
and in executive sessions, it became appar- 
ent that I could not associate myself with 
the recommendations which were drafted 
by the Chairman and endorsed by the 
Company nominee, my confrere Mr. 
Meighen. Although on some items I could 
possibly have agreed, the number and im- 
portance of my dissents made it more 
practical for me to prepare this minority 
or dissenting report in the course of which 
I shall indicate the points where I do concur 
with my colleagues. 

I must say at the outset that I consider 
the report of a Conciliation Board not as 
an adjudication whereby arbitrators or 
judges decide what is right or wrong ac- 
cording to the strict evidence adduced, but 
only as a last effort to suggest to parties 
involved in an industrial dispute, a solution 
to their problems. 

In this particular case, as the Board 
Chairman suggested at the outset of the 
hearings and got consent from the parties 
to omitting any kind of formal evidence, it 
becomes evident that in the absence of clear 
evidence on many points, no adjudication is 
acceptable nor fair, and I shall refuse to 
follow that line and restrict myself to 
indicate possible avenues of compromise to 
the parties. 

A rather lengthy experience on these 
Boards has taught me the wisdom of such 
an approach. 

I have carefully read the notes of the 
Chairman of the Board as endorsed by the 



Company nominee, and I shall follow the 
same order as close as possible in order to 
facilitate the work of the parties who may 
try to utilize all our notes in some way 
to effect a peaceful settlement of their 
dispute. 

A — Requests of the Brotherhood 

No. 1. Afternoon and Night Shift Differ- 
entials in Yard Service 

This request is rejected by a majority of 
the Board because of extra cost involved. 
The other reason involved is that locomo- 
tive engineers are not to be compared with 
other workers. 

The figures produced during the hearings 
indicate that not all engineers are in yard 
service, and among the latter only a frac- 
tion work on shifts. Therefore the cost 
would not be as substantial as alleged in 
the majority report. Furthermore, this extra 
cost must be considered in the package of 
increases that will eventually become the 
basis of settlement of the agreement. 

One thing remains sure. The Brotherhood 
did establish in evidence that shift differen- 
tials are a universally recognized fact in 
industrial relations, and the percentages 
requested by the Brotherhood are standard, 
that is, 5 per cent for the evening shift and 
10 per cent for night shift. Every worker 
in Canada will recognize the legitimacy of 
this demand and the percentages claimed 
by the engineers. 

What is even more interesting is that the 
evidence has revealed that workers in the 
transportation field who work on approxi- 
mately the same schedules and under prac- 
tically similar conditions as locomotive en- 
gineers, do receive shift premiums: air 
transport, urban and suburban passenger 
transport, interurban bus and coach trans- 
port and trucking. 

Finally I do not recognize the validity of 
the argument of my colleagues on that point 
for another reason. As will be seen from a 
summation of their recommendations, what- 
ever is peculiar to locomotive engineers in 
their working conditions, they systematically 
recommend to abolish. One has to be logi- 
cal. If locomotive engineers must be con- 
sidered like any other category of Canadian 
workers and, therefore, just to relinquish 
peculiar conditions of work, then it is also 
imperative that they be granted all and 
everyone of the working conditions and 
benefits of other Canadian workers, in- 
cluding shift differentials. 

I therefore recommend that in the next 
collective agreements, the shift differentials 
be inserted as requested by the Brotherhood. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 196* 



175 



No. 2. Annual Vacation with Pay 

My colleagues have made a recommenda- 
tion on this, granting four weeks of vacation 
with pay for employees who have completed 
25 years' continuous service with a com- 
pensation of 8 per cent of the gross wages. 
As a Board we did not have to make any 
recommendation on this, since both parties 
declared before the Board that they had 
agreed on the principle of this addition to 
the respective collective agreements and that 
the only point left in issue was the wording 
of the new rule governing it. A careful 
study of the respective texts proposed by 
the parties brings me to the conclusion that 
the Company text would open the door to 
disputes because of the language used. 

I therefore recommend that the working 
of the new rule agreed upon by both parties 
be that of the Brotherhood. 

No. 3. M. U. Cars 

The Brotherhood expressed willingness 
during the hearings to re-discuss this demand 
in view of an overall settlement, and there 
I shall let it lie. 

No. 4. Passenger Service 

The Brotherhood requested that overtime 
in all passenger service be paid at the rate 
of 20 m.p.h. 

Same recommendation as for No. 3 above. 

No. 5. Preparatory and Inspection 
Allowance 

By this request the Brotherhood is de- 
manding the deletion of Articles 3 -A and 
4-D of the contracts. 

It did appear during the hearings that the 
C.P.R. and the Brotherhood have a rule 
governing the work of engineers in pre- 
paring and inspecting consists. On the other 
hand my colleagues, as is easily seen by 
reading their report, often invoke the neces- 
sity of parity between the two Companies, 
C.N.R. and C.P.R. 

This is a very good place to apply this 
parity and I fail to see how they could 
reject this opportunity. 

I therefore recommend to the parties to 
insert in the next collective agreements, the 
same rule that appears in the agreements 
between this same Brotherhood and C.P.R. 
regarding preparatory and inspection time 
on all classes of service for all C.N.R. 
engineers. 

No. 6. Statutory Holidays for Road Service 
Engineers on the Same Basis as for Yard 
Service Engineers 

I realized with stupefaction during the 
course of the hearings, that the locomotive 
engineers did not enjoy the universally 
recognized principle of statutory holidays. 



The majority of the Board recommends 
rejection of the Brotherhood demand for 
three reasons: 

a. Increase in pay proposed by majority 
(in other words, cost) 

b. It would be a departure in North 
American railway practice 

c. Locomotive engineers have much lei- 
sure in road service since they work 
as an average below forty hours a 
week, and statutory holidays have 
always been granted to provide addi- 
tional leisure without loss of pay. 

As to reason (c) above, it is the first 
time in my experience that the justification 
for granting statutory holidays is thus ex- 
plained. Statutory holidays with pay were 
granted in order not to deprive workers of 
their normal gains in case of a day less 
occurring in normal work weeks. From then 
it did develop in many instances into a 
straight fringe benefit. 

That is so true that many classes of 
workers today who work less than 35 hours 
per week, e.g. photoengravers, printers, 
lithographers, still receive paid statutory 
holidays. Further, many categories of work- 
ers who are placed in the identical position 
described by the majority report, that is, 
having to work because of the nature of 
their work on these very statutory holidays, 
still enjoy them by way of an equivalent 
number of substitute days: fire-fighters, 
policemen, manual workers in cities, etc. 

As to reason (b), I do not consider it 
serious enough to reject the demand. If 
every conciliator were to refuse to make a 
suggestion in any field of industrial relations 
because it would break new grounds, no 
progress would ever be achieved. If such a 
recommendation brings about a settlement, 
and if it does rectify an unbelievable back- 
ward area of the collective agreements be- 
tween these two parties, I do not hesitate 
to recommend its adoption by the parties. 

Here again I point out that my two col- 
leagues in all of their report attempt to 
bring the working conditions of locomotive 
engineers in line with those of other work- 
ers by suggesting the abolition of everything 
existing which differs from other collective 
agreements. If so, what appears in the 
working conditions of every other worker in 
Canada must also be afforded to locomotive 
engineers and, whoever heard of a Cana- 
dian worker that does not enjoy paid 
statutory holidays in the year 1961. 

As to cost, it of course is part and parcel 
of the overall increases in money benefits. 

Finally on this point, the Brotherhood 
adduced solid evidence that in all other 
types of transport, statutory holidays are 



176 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



an established and recognized fact and, even 
in the C.N.R., categories of operating em- 
ployees already receive statutory holidays 
benefits. 

I would recommend the adoption of the 
Brotherhood request. 

No. 7. Held Away-jrom-home Terminal 

During conciliation the Brotherhood ex- 
pressed some willingness to discuss this 
request in terms of an overall satisfactory 
settlement. I shall leave it at that. 

No. 8. Switching en Route, and No. 9. 
Switching at Terminals and Turn-around 
Points 

Same remarks as for demand No. 7 above. 

No. 10. Rest on Road 

This demand of the Brotherhood led to 
long discussions before the Board. As may 
be seen it also brought long remarks by 
the majority of the Board. However, I take 
exception to one statement found therein. 
On page 14 it is stated ". . . until the 
Brotherhood can bring forward more speci- 
fic instances of undue fatigue being en- 
countered. . . ." Again, I repeat, that the 
parties were suggested not to bring any 
evidence by the Chairman of this Board. 

I personally would have liked to hear very 
concrete evidence on this, since it does in- 
volve the safety of the public. Not having 
personally driven trains, it is with great 
attention that I listened to illustrations and 
read arguments by the parties in trying to 
visualize what it could be to drive a train 
containing either many human lives or valu- 
able freight during a span of more than 
eight hours. 

I have had occasion to drive cars on 
business for more than 8 hours a day when 
I was alone and, if it is any slight basis for 
comparison, I see much justification in the 
request of the Brotherhood, especially when 
I think of public safety. 

On the other hand, I fail to see that it 
is the responsibility of the Brotherhood to 
go before the Board of Transport Commis- 
sioners. Let us imagine what kind of posi- 
tion the locomotive engineers would be 
placed in if the simple following query were 
to be thrown at them by members of that 
Board: "Are you pleading before us that 
you presently are endangering the lives of 
hundreds of Canadians?". 

I would recommend the adoption of this 
change to the rule as proposed by the 
Brotherhood. 

No. 11. Insurance 

See my remarks as to items 7, 8, 9 above. 



No. 12. Steam-generator Cars 

In the course of conciliation before this 
Board, the Brotherhood made a concrete 
suggestion to the Carrier on this issue. 

I refer the parties to such suggestion. 

No. 13. Deadheading 

I concur with my two colleagues on this 
point. 

No. 14. Final Terminal Time 

The request of the Brotherhood is that 
Article 7F presently in application in 
Eastern Canada be made applicable to the 
Western Region. My two colleagues on the 
Board admit that this request has merit and 
further on many other points they have 
recommended equalization between East 
and West. 

Applying these criteria, I come to the 
conclusion that this request should be 
granted and become part of the new agree- 
ment between this Carrier and the Brother- 
hood. 

No. 15. Transportation 

After having read the briefs on this point 
as well as my colleagues' suggested solu- 
tion, I would like to recommend the fol- 
lowing rule. 

Where employees come on duty at one 
place and off duty at another some dis- 
tance away, it shall be the responsibility of 
the Company to provide transportation 
either public or otherwise at its own cost 
back to the starting point, and within 15 
minutes of the end of work. Any time over 
10 minutes to be considered as overtime 
and to be credited to the employee as such. 

No. 16. Work Train Guarantee 

See remarks regarding items 7, 8, 9, 11. 

No. 17. Other Positions 

I concur with my two colleagues on this 
item. 

No. 18. Homes — Compensation for Moving 
See remarks regarding items 7, 8, 9, 11, 
16. 

No. 19. Wage Increases 
To be dealt with later. 

No. 20. Preparatory Time 

The Brotherhood wished to have an in- 
crease in time allowed. I shall deal with 
this later. 

No. 21. Long Runs 

See my remarks on item No. 10. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



177 



B — Requests of the Company 

No. 1. Arbitraries Removed 

The major request of the Company is the 
reduction of all arbitraries. A definition of 
what they are appears in the majority report 
and it reads: 

"They are payments to which engineers are 
entitled for certain periods of time before the 
commencement of the trip and at the end of 
the trip, and for certain time when engines run 
through terminals." 

The basic contention of the Company for 
justifying its request that they be reduced 
may be summarized as follows: 

"We shall pay from the time required to 
report for duty." The basic contentions of 
the Brotherhood to justify their retention 
and increase in some circumstances may be 
summarized as follows: 

"Before being capable of safely and 
adequately leaving engines after termination of 
duty, many minutes must be spent." 

One additional allegation of the engi- 
neers is that across the years, the Carrier 
did recognize the truth of the position of 
the engineers to the extent that it did build 
into the wage structure allowances towards 
these extra minutes on the basis of arbitrary 
allowances. 

A fundamental difficulty arises in my 
view in that many persons, including the 
Chairman of the present Board, have been 
impressed with the word "arbitrary." This 
is reflected in the approach which is, that 
these must disappear, and that the engi- 
neers must bargain them away and that the 
more time elapses, the less value they have. 
I am far from convinced that these allow- 
ances have only relative values or "arbi- 
trary" values. I say that since they were 
accepted by both parties as being an in- 
tegral part of wages, they have an abso- 
lute value, such as for instance when an- 
other union will state "We want a 10 cent 
increase of which 5 cents shall be applic- 
able to basic rates of pay and 5 cents shall 
be deposited on behalf of each employee 
in a pension fund." If the Company agrees 
that 10 cents is justified, it is not because 
5 cents of the 10 cents is turned into a 
pension fund, that it has only an arbitrary 
or relative value. 

For that reason, I am quite unwilling to 
concur with my colleagues on their recom- 
mendation as to arbitraries reductions in 
road service, shop preparatory, run-through, 
preparatory, shop final inspection, run- 
through inspection, yard service, work train 
service. 



My recommendations would be on differ- 
ent lines: 

a. Regarding preparatory and inspection 
time for all classes of service: parity 
with the C.P.R. present allowances. 

b. Any reduction in arbitraries to be 
compensated directly by an equivalent 
increase in the basic rate of pay, there- 
by inflicting no loss to any engineer. 
These increases in the basic rates of 
pay to be independent from and before 
the application of any general increase 
on the basic rates of pay. 

I would also suggest that a third condi- 
tion be admitted by Carrier and imple- 
mented by the agreement to be entered 
between it and this Brotherhood in case of 
reduction or disappearance of these arbi- 
traries. As of the moment when the arbi- 
traries are all gone, the engineers must be 
relieved of all and any responsibility for 
the mechanical condition of the locomotives. 

In a plant, operators of machines are not 
requested to repair or maintain machinery 
before they start work and after they finish. 
Somebody else does that for them. They are 
not held responsible for mechanically main- 
taining machines. The same should apply 
to engineers when all allowances shall have 
been removed, if ever . 

No. 2. Separate Run in Eastern Region 

No. 4. Release at Final Terminal 

We do not agree with the majority re- 
port granting this demand of the Company. 
It means that engineers could be required 
to perform switching after arrival at final 
terminal for hours after completion of the 
trip at much lower rates than yard-service 
engineers. 

No. 3. Called for Straight -away or Turn- 
around Service 

I concur with my colleagues on this item 
rejecting the Company request. 

No. 5. Switching at Terminals and En Route 
I concur with my colleagues on this item 
rejecting the Company request. 

No. 6. Attending Locomotives and Steam- 
generator Units 

I do not concur with my colleagues on 
this item. 

No. 7. Health and Welfare 

The Brotherhood, during the conciliatory 
stage before our Board granted the demand 
of the Company on this point, so I fail to 
see why there is a recommendation on it 
by the majority. 



178 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



No. 8. Junction Switching 

I concur with my colleagues in rejecting 
this demand of the Company. 

No. 9. Detention and Switching at Inter- 
mediate Regions 

I concur with my colleagues in rejecting 
this demand of the Company. 

No. 10. Sleeping Quarters 
I concur. 

C — Rates of Pay — Retroactivity — Duration 
of the Agreement 

I have read the notes of my colleagues 
on the problem of increases in wages. I 
definitely do net concur with either the 
motives or the conclusions arrived at. For 
years, settlements in the railway industry 
regarding wages in Canada have been the 
same for operating or running trades and 
non-ops. 

As a matter of fact, it is notorious that 
it has always been the favourite argument 
of C.N.R. in opposing attempts by "ops" to 
break this pattern, to point out that settle- 
ments have always been the same for the 
two groups. It is also notorious that the 
Chairman of the present Board has sup- 
ported this position of C.N.R. in other 
recommendations. I therefore come to the 
conclusion that the least that we can do is 
to grant a general increase in basic rates 
equivalent to that which form the basis of 
the non-ops settlement recently arrived at 
between C.N.R. and those groups of its 
employees. 

During the hearings C.N.R. has offered 
the following: 

2 per cent on October 1, 1961 

2 per cent on October 1, 1962 

\\ per cent on January 1, 1964 

with the expiry date in May 1964 for a 

three-year agreement. 

The Brotherhood did offer to settle on 
the basis of 2 per cent on the first of May 
1961, 3 per cent on January 1, 1962 and 3 
per cent on October 1, 1962 for a two-year 
agreement expiring on the 1st of May, 1963. 
As compared to this the recent non-ops 
settlement was: 

January 1, 1960 — 1.13 per cent 
September 1, 1960 — 2.83 " " 
May 1, 1961 — 4 " " 

for a total of 7.96 per cent. 

My suggestion for wage increases will at 
least be equivalent to this non-ops settle- 
ment. 



Regarding some of the arguments used 
by my colleagues, I would like to comment 
as follows: Although C.N.R. has had less 
operations in recent years than previously, 
these operations are much more profitable. 
This is due to the greater productivity, of 
which a certain degree must be credited to 
more efficiency on the part of the engineers. 

Regarding the average wages of engineers 
in 1960 and assuming that the figure quoted 
of $7,000.00 is correct, it still will not make 
of them "the aristocracy of employees." 
Even if it were so, we are living in a free 
economy where every Canadian citizen is 
told the Horatio Alger story. Therefore 
there is nothing wrong in engineers attempt- 
ing to increase their standard of living. 
There is nothing wrong either in attempting 
to maintain their standard of living in com- 
parison with other workers in Canada. 

Regarding the increase of 20^ per cent in 
5 years in the wages of engineers, I would 
like to say that this is standard for all Cana- 
dian workers. Also this increase of 20i 
per cent has been the same for all other 
categories of Railway employees. 

I come to the conclusion therefore that 
for a two-year agreement retroactive to 
May 1, 1961, the following wages increases 
should be granted to the Brotherhood mem- 
bers and locomotive engineers of the 
C.N.R.: 

Effective as of May 1, 1961: 

A 2 per cent increase on basic rates of 
pay, arbitraries and special allowances based 
on rates in effect April 30, 1961. 

A further increase of 2 per cent effective 
January 1, 1962 on the same basis. A 
further increase on October 1, 1962, of 
3 per cent on the same basis. 

As to the suggestion made by my two 
colleagues of a flat sum of money and com- 
pensation for the loss or reduction in arbi- 
traries varying from $75.00 to $20.00, I 
am staunchly opposed to such a pitiful com- 
pensation for subtracting from the annual 
income of locomotive engineers approxi- 
mately, the way I have figured it, 5 per cent. 

This, Honorable Sir, is the recommenda- 
tions which I would recommend the parties 
to implement in their Collective Agreements 
to be entered to replace those that expire 
on May 1, 1961. 

I wish to thank the Board and my two 
colleagues on the Board for their co- 
operation in attempting to solve this difficult 
problem. 

Signed in Montreal, this 8th day of 
December 1961. 

(Sgd.) Marc Lapointe, 
Member. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



179 



Report of Board in Dispute Between 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company 

and 

Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers 



The Board of Conciliation and Investiga- 
tion, appointed under the Industrial Rela- 
tions and Disputes Investigation Act to deal 
with the dispute between the Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company and the Brother- 
hood of Locomotive Engineers (Atlantic 
and Eastern Regions and Prairie and Pacific 
Regions), met the parties in Montreal on 
August 1, 2, 3, and August 11, and on 
September 28. The members of the Board 
were present at all meetings, and the parties 
and the Board were engaged all day of 
September 28 in an effort to conciliate the 
issues in dispute. The Board also met in 
executive session in Montreal on Novem- 
ber 9. 

At these meetings there appeared on 
behalf of the Company: 

A. M. Hand— Assistant Manager, Labour Rela- 
tions (Chairman) Montreal. 

J. Ramage — Labour Relations Assistant, Mont- 
real. 

D. Cardi— Senior Schedule Analyst, Montreal. 

F. G. Firmin — Supervisor of Personnel and 
Labour Relations, Atlantic Region, Montreal. 

F. W. McCurry — Supervisor of Personnel and 
Labour Relations, Eastern Region, Toronto. 

J. C. Anderson — Supervisor of Personnel and 
Labour Relations, Prairie Region, Winnipeg. 

J. G. Benedetti — Supervisor of Personnel and 
Labour Relations, Pacific Region, Vancouver. 



During December, the Minister of Labour 
received the Report of the Board of Con- 
ciliation and Investigation established to deal 
with a dispute between the Canadian Pacific 
Railway Company and the Brotherhood of 
Locomotive Engineers. 

The Board was under the chairmanship of 
His Honour Judge J. C. Anderson of Belle- 
ville, Ont. He was appointed by the Minister 
in the absence of a joint recommendation 
from the other two members, R. V. Hicks, 
Q.C. of Toronto, and Marc Lapointe of 
Montreal, nominees of the company and 
union, respectively. 

The majority report, which under the 
provisions of the Industrial Relations and 
Disputes Investigation Act constitutes the 
Report of the Board, was submitted by the 
Chairman and Mr. Hicks. 

The minority report was submitted by Mr. 
Lapointe. Judge Anderson made a supple- 
mentary statement and Mr. Hicks sub- 
mitted an addendum. 

The majority and minority reports to- 
gether with the supplementary statement and 
addendum, are reproduced here. 



And on behalf of the Brotherhood of 
Locomotive Engineers: 

O. J. Travers — Assistant Grand Chief Engineer, 

B.L.E., Montreal. 
D. Peltiel — Economist, Research Associates, 

Montreal. 
J. F. Walter— General Chairman, B.L.E., 

Montreal. 
H. L. May — General Chairman, B.L.E., Winni- 
peg. 
J. W. Macdonald — General Chairman, B.L.E., 

Truro. 
G. B. Trimble— General Chairman, B.L.E., 

Winnipeg. 
W. J. Wright— General Chairman, B.L.E., 

Montreal. 

The last agreement as it affected the 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, on 
behalf of the locomotive engineers employed 
on the Atlantic and Eastern Regions, was 
in effect from July 14, 1958 until January 

14, 1961, and the last agreement as it 
affected the locomotive engineers employed 
on the Prairie and Pacific Regions was in 
effect from August 15, 1958 until February 

15, 1961. 

Both parties to the dispute asked for 
many amendments to the contract, and since 
the Board was not successful in conciliating 
the dispute, it becomes necessary for it to 
report and recommend concerning the re- 
quested amendments made by the parties. 
This report will be divided into three parts. 
The first part will deal with requested 
amendments put forward on behalf of the 
Brotherhood. The second part will deal with 
requested amendments put forward by the 
Company, and the third part will deal with 
the Brotherhood's request for a 15 per cent 
increase in basic pay rates, arbitraries and 
special allowances. 

General Statement 

The number of employees concerned in 
this case is as follows: 

Passenger Engineers — 270 
Freight Engineers — 959 

Yard Engineers — 685 



Total 



1914 



These employees are all engineers of the 
Canadian Pacific Railway system, including 
the Quebec Central Railway and the 
Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway, but not 



180 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



including the engineers on the Brownville- 
Newport seniority rosters in the United 
States. As will be apparent from what has 
been stated above, the engineers are covered 
by two different collective agreements, one 
applicable to the Atlantic and Eastern 
Regions covering all the Canadian Pacific 
Railway territory east of Fort William, and 
the other covering the same group on the 
Prairie and Pacific Regions, embracing all 
that territory of the Railway west of Fort 
William. 

The requests for changes in the contract 
are similar as between East and West, but 
in the Prairie and Pacific Regions contract, 
the engineers have three additional requests. 
When dealing with the engineer's requests 
they will be dealt with both as they affect 
the Atlantic and Eastern Regions and as 
they affect the Prairie and Pacific Regions, 
where the requests are similar or the same, 
and where the requests are additional, as 
are three requests on the Prairie and Pacific 
Regions, they will be best dealt with sepa- 
rately in this report. 

Brotherhood's Proposals 

C.P. Eastern & Atlantic Regions 
Preamble: Request for Change In 

This proposal is: 

Add to Preamble 

Paragraph 3: The Company shall not make 
any material change or alteration to existing 
working conditions or introduce new methods 
of operating during the term of this contract, 
without the concurrence of the general chair- 
man of the Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Engineers. 

The Brotherhood states that it has put 
forward this request because there has been 
a growing trend in management circles to- 
ward imposing unilaterally-decided changes 
in working conditions during the life of the 
agreement, by invoking the doctrine of 
management rights, and that the history of 
recent efforts by the Brotherhood of Rail- 
way Trainmen to negotiate a definition of 
fundamental rights, has left much to be 
desired. The Brotherhood suggests that the 
employer might, under some circumstances, 
be prepared to and might invoke the "man- 
agement's residual rights theory" to override 
protective clauses to support unilateral 
actions on matters which might affect the 
employees' rights and interests. 

The Brotherhood says that no doubt the 
Railway would submit that, because of a 
long relationship of collective bargaining 
between the parties, that there need be no 
cause for concern over possible abuse of 
the management's rights clause, but the 
Brotherhood's view is that the management's 
rights clause should not be viewed in the 



light of existing good relations and mutual 
understanding, but that it should be ex- 
amined in the light of how such a clause 
could be used by a hostile employer at any 
time in the future. 

The Company, in answering the argument 
of the Brotherhood, asserts that to argue 
that no new methods of operating will be 
introduced during the term of the contract 
without the concurrence of the general 
chairman of the Brotherhood, is a direct 
infringement on management's right to make 
the decisions which management must make 
in order to operate efficiently and remain 
competitive. It also asserts that if the 
Railway were to agree to the proposal, it 
would be a restriction of its authority which 
would put in the hands of the general chair- 
man of the Brotherhood a unilateral right to 
restrict company policy in respect of meth- 
ods of operation and the introduction of 
new devices designed to increase efficiency. 

Recommendation — The Board does not 
feel that it should recommend the inclusion 
in the contract of the Brotherhood's pro- 
posed preamble paragraph respecting man- 
agement's rights but, on the other hand, it 
sees no reason why, if the Company does 
intend at any future time to make any 
material change or alterations to existing 
working conditions, or if it does intend to 
introduce new methods of operating during 
the term of the contract, it should not, inso- 
far as possible, give such advance notice as 
it can to the general chairman of Locomo- 
tive Engineers, and should discuss the effect 
of the changes with the said chairman. 

Paragraph 4: 

Amend fourth paragraph to reflect change in 
effective date and term of contract and reduce 
120 days notice to 60 days notice. 

Under this request the Brotherhood would 
like to have reduced to 60 from 120 days 
the notice that shall be given by either party 
of its desire to revise or supersede the Con- 
tract prior to expiry date. 

Recommendation — The Board sees no 
good reason why this period should not be 
reduced to 60 from 120 days and recom- 
mends that the new contract provide that, 
in the event either party wishes to revise or 
supersede the agreement, that this shall be 
done by giving the other party 60 days 
notice of such desire, the 60 days to be at 
least 60 days prior to the termination of the 
forthcoming contract, but which would not 
cancel the agreement prior to its expiry 
date. 

I— Article 1 
Clause (a) 

Rates of pay per day of 100 miles. 

Increase present basic rates, arbitraries and 
special allowances by 15 per cent. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • 

53741-5—5 



FEBRUARY 7962 



181 



II — Article 2 
Clause (b) 

Engineer to be allowed 30 minutes prepara- 
tory time for one unit plus 10 minutes for each 
additional unit in locomotive consist. 

Clause (c) Paragraph 3 

Short-turn passenger rule to read 20 miles 
per hour where 12i miles per hour presently 
appears. 

Add clause to provide yard rates of pay for 
time occupied in terminal switching. 

The Brotherhood says that the 30 minutes 
preparatory time for one unit plus 10 min- 
utes for each additional unit in the loco- 
motive consist constitutes a minimum of 
time, according to its view, in which to 
permit the locomotive engineer to perform 
the duties required of him in order to 
comply with the "Uniform Code of Oper- 
ating Rules", and the Brotherhood went to 
some length to explain to the Board what 
the engineer is required to do in a prepara- 
tory way if he is to conform to a code of 
operating rules and the instructions relating 
thereto. As the Board sees it, if the Brother- 
hood's request were met, all the duties of 
locomotive engineers would have to be 
spelled out in detail in the contract. 

The Company submits that it is imprac- 
ticable to define duties and responsibilities 
of an engineer in detail because they vary 
from trip to trip, depending upon the cir- 
cumstances and conditions arising during 
any particular tour of duty. The Company 
points out that after an exhaustive negotia- 
tion and investigation, the preparatory and 
arbitrary road service was reduced in 1959 
to 15 minutes, and that being the case, the 
request by the engineers for an increase in 
preparatory time arbitrary and road service 
with no increase in duties, can only be in- 
terpreted as a request for increased com- 
pensation for which no increased services 
are required. 

Recommendation — The Board does not 
recommend the adoption of the Brother- 
hood's proposal. 

The second part of this numbered re- 
quest would amend the rule in short-turn 
passenger service to read 20 miles per hour 
where 12i miles per hour presently appears, 
and to provide yard rates of pay for time 
occupied in terminal switching. Presently, 
engineers on established passenger runs of 
less than 100 miles one way are paid on a 
continuous-time basis from the time they 
are ordered until laid up at the end of the 
day, at the rate of 12i miles per hour, 
with overtime at pro rata rates, and the 
engineer on such a run is guaranteed a 
minimum of 100 miles per day exclusive of 
his initial time. If the miles run, or the 
miles run and the service performed, in- 
cluding switching, together with all time 



held at the terminal and turn-around points 
between the trips combined at the end of 
the day exceed 12i miles per hour, then 
the mileage will be paid, and the Brother- 
hood's request is now to change the basis 
of payment from 12i miles per hour to 
20 miles per hour. 

The Board is informed that short runs 
in passenger service are almost entirely 
concerned with suburban service in the 
East, for which the engineer, while being 
paid from the time he reports for duty un- 
til he is released from duty, is actually 
working only a percentage of the time. 

In asking the Board to grant this request, 
the engineers' representative says that the 
request is that the engineers in short-turn 
passenger service be paid overtime at the 
rate of 20 miles per hour instead of 12i 
miles per hour, which is presently the prac- 
tice, and in support of his request he points 
out that engineers in passenger service other 
than short turn are paid overtime on a 
speed basis of 20 miles an hour at pro rata 
rates, and the time does not commence un- 
til the time on duty exceeds the miles run 
divided by 20. The Brotherhood submits 
that in outside industry, the time-and-a-half 
of the regular rate rather than pro rata 
rates appears to be the common practice 
when overtime is required. 

Recommendation — It would appear that 
although an engineer in short turn-around 
service might be on duty in excess of 8 
hours, he might only be actually working 
a maximum of 4 or 5 hours a day. In other 
words, it is seldom that he is actually per- 
forming operating duties more than 8 
hours, and in the Board's opinion, when 
a minimum day is guaranteed exclusive of 
the initial time, and when the engineers are 
seldom on duty the full minimum day, 
it is not inequitable that the overtime 
should be paid at pro rata rates. Therefore 
the Board does not recommend that the 
Brotherhood's request be granted. 

Ill— Article 3 
Clause (b) 

Engineer to be allowed 30 minutes prepara- 
tory time for one unit, plus 10 minutes for each 
additional unit in locomotive consist. 

This amendment is identical to the 
amendment requested in Brotherhood's pro- 
posal No. 2 with reference to the amend- 
ment requested to Article 2 of the contract. 

Recommendation — The Board does not 
see fit to recommend the amendment sug- 
gested for the same reasons given in not 
recommending Brotherhood proposal No. 2 
as above. 



182 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



IV — Article 4 
Clause (a) 

Unit basis of pay for yard service. 
Clause (s) 

Add Remembrance Day as paid statutory 
holiday. 

Add new clause to provide regularly assigned 
engineer who renders service on a yard assign- 
ment on the last day such assignment operates 
prior to a statutory holiday, 100 miles as pay- 
ment for such statutory holiday at rate of last 
locomotive operated. 

New clause to provide premium rate of pay 
for afternoon and night assignments. 

This proposal is divided into three parts. 
Under Clause (a) the Brotherhood is re- 
questing a unit basis of pay for yard ser- 
vice. Under the present clause, there is a 
classification by weight on each of the 
drivers, and the basic day's pay, depending 
on the weight on drivers, varies from $18.26 
to $21.37. Under the Brotherhood's pro- 
posal, instead of having graduated rates 
for each engineer according to the weight 
on him as a driver, they would substitute 
single rates to apply to all locomotives in 
yard service. 

According to the Company statement, 
this would result in direct increases in basic 
rates of pay for approximately half the 
locomotives used in the service for which 
there would be no additional work per- 
formed or service rendered. The Brother- 
hood, however, supports its proposal for 
a unit basis of pay for yard engineers be- 
cause its proposal would be based on exactly 
the same formula used to arrive at the unit 
basis of pay for engineers in passenger and 
freight service, that is, a rate based on the 
average rate of all yard units in service. 

Recommendation — The Board recom- 
mends that a unit basis of pay be estab- 
lished between the high and the low rates 
generally paid in yard service. This could 
be brought about by arriving at a weighted 
average between the high and the low rates 
paid in yard service. The reasons that the 
Board suggests a weighted average is be- 
cause it understands there are more heavy 
units in use than light units, and if a 
weighted average rate mid-way between the 
high and low rates is taken, it would take 
this into account and arrive at a rate which 
the Board feels is fair to all concerned. 

The second part of the Brotherhood's 
request No. 4 is that Remembrance Day be 
included in the present statutory holiday 
rule governing yard engineers. 

Recommendation — The yard engineers 
are presently allowed seven statutory holi- 
days and the Board does not see fit to 
recommend that Remembrance Day be 
added to the seven presently enjoyed. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • 

53741-5—51 



FEBRUARY 7962 



The third part of the Brotherhood's pro- 
posal No. 4 is that when a regular yard 
assignment is cancelled as a result of an 
approaching statutory holiday, the loco- 
motive engineer assigned shall be compen- 
sated to the extent of 100 miles (8 hours) 
at the rate for locomotive in service last 
performed, but that this should not apply 
to an engineer who exercises seniority on 
other assignments. The Company asserts 
that if this proposal were adopted, it would 
mean that an engineer whose assignment 
is cancelled prior to the statutory holiday 
(if cancelled on the statutory holiday he 
gets the statutory holiday) due to reduction 
in business would, even though the job 
no longer existed, be entitled to one day's 
pay for a statutory holiday that occurred 
at a later date. 

Recommendation — The Board does not 
see fit to recommend this proposal as its 
view is that the yard engineer is reasonably 
well protected under the present clause. 

The last part of proposal No. 4 is that 
there should be a new clause added to the 
agreement to provide premium rates of pay 
for afternoon and night assignments in yard 
service, and if the proposal were adopted, 
a locomotive engineer in yard service who 
is required to report for duty between the 
hours of 12 noon and 5.59 p.m. standard 
time would receive an additional 5 per cent 
in basic rates of pay for such shift, and a 
locomotive engineer in yard service who 
was required to report for duty between the 
hours of 6 p.m. and 5 a.m. standard time, 
would receive an additional 15 per cent in 
basic rates of pay for such service. 

In support of its contention that yard 
engineers should be paid added differentials 
for afternoon and night shifts, it submits 
that the burdens of responsibility of the 
locomotive engineer are greatly increased 
when the duties are performed during the 
evening or night hours; there is disruption 
of home and social life involved in the shift 
work, and this disruption is now recognized 
in Canadian industry which to an ever in- 
creasing extent is paying additional com- 
pensation for shift work. 

There is no doubt about the fact that 
differential payments for shift work, after- 
noon and evening, are quite common in 
industrial labour contracts, the basic theory 
being that when an employee is required to 
work during hours other than what are con- 
sidered normal working hours, he should be 
paid additional compensation. In some com- 
panies who don't normally have a second 
or third shift, the additional pay acts to 
some extent as an incentive to the company 
not to schedule work during off hours. 



183 



There are, however, other companies who 
are on two- or three-shift operations steadily, 
who do pay the differential for the second 
and third shift. 

The locomotive engineer in yard service 
performs work on a 24-hour basis, and 
sometimes has to work 6 days a week, and 
perhaps even 7 days a week. The most 
senior man is entitled to choose his hours, 
and if the most senior man desires the day- 
time shift he receives it through the exercise 
of seniority, and the junior man, no matter 
how junior, receives the same rate of pay 
as the senior man but is not entitled, if he 
is junior, to pick the shift that he desires. 

The Railway submits that the engineers 
already receive what amounts to a differen- 
tial because the senior man has the choice 
of the assignment, and the junior man gets 
equal pay to that of the senior man. It is 
true that this arrangement is different from 
that found in industrial trades generally. 

Recommendation — The Board is of the 
opinion that because of the seniority rights 
applying to the preferred time of working 
that an engineer enjoys, the reason for him 
receiving a differential in pay for off-shift 
work is not the same as that in industrial 
classes generally. To grant the engineers' 
request would involve a very substantial 
amount of extra cost and for these two 
reasons, especially in view of the recom- 
mendations hereinafter made for increase in 
basic rates of pay, the Board does not see 
fit to recommend the Brotherhood request 
be granted. 

V — Article 5 
Clause (b) 

Amend Paragraph 1 to allow for payment of 
deadheading at the highest rate plus fare and/or 
expenses, when ordered to deadhead by other 
than rail transportation. 

Clause (f) 

Amend rule to provide payment equal to 
actual pay lost for spare engineers when attend- 
ing court and payment at rate of $2.50 per 
hour to engineer required to attend court during 
off duty hours. 

Clause (h) 

Amend rule to provide payment when 
engineer is required to set up unit or units for 
multiple service. 

The first part of this request is that an 
engineer required to deadhead by other than 
railway transportation, be paid at the highest 
deadhead rate plus his fare and expenses, 
and the Brotherhood in support of its re- 
quest says that the present deadhead rule 
makes no provision for the rate to be paid 
when deadhead service is performed on 
other than rail transportation, and that when 
other than rail transportation is required for 



deadheading, the Company should pay the 
cost of transportation as well as pay for the 
deadhead time. 

The Company says that the present prac- 
tice is that individuals or crews may be 
deadheaded as passengers on freight or pas- 
senger trains, and when freight or passenger 
trains can't be utilized, the Company may 
require deadheading to be done by taxi or 
bus, and in such instances the expense is 
borne by the Company. 

Recommendation [Clause (b)] — The Com- 
pany has a request in for a reduction in 
deadheading payments which is dealt with 
under Company proposals, but with refer- 
ence to this particular proposal, the Board 
is of the opinion that when deadheading is 
required by other than railway transporta- 
tion, if the Company pays the cost of such 
transportation it should in addition to that, 
pay the lowest deadhead rate for the time 
occupied in deadheading. 

Clause (f). This proposal is to amend 
the rule to provide payment equal to actual 
pay lost for spare engineers when attend- 
ing court and payment at the rate of $2.50 
an hour to an engineer required to attend 
court during off-duty hours. 

The Brotherhood asserts that this rule is 
necessary because regularly assigned engi- 
neers who are required to attend court are 
compensated to the extent of wages they 
would have earned except for their absence 
attending court, while spare engineers re- 
ceive only a low rate of $1.85 per hour to 
a maximum of 8 hours in 24 hours held. 

The Brotherhood further says that if a 
spare engineer loses one yard shift while 
attending court, he would receive $14.80, 
while his loss would amount to at least 
$19.55, being the lowest yard basic day 
rate, and under similar circumstances the 
spare road engineer might lose a trip of 
250 miles during the 24 hours he is held 
for court duty and consequently suffer an 
even greater loss. 

The Brotherhood further asserts that 
engineers should not be required to give up 
their off duty time without compensation, 
and to meet this need they suggest that 
Clause 3 of Article 5(f) be amended by 
allowing for payment at the nominal rate 
of $2.50 an hour for all time required to 
be available while off duty. 

The Company points out that the Brother- 
hood's proposal would require all engi- 
neers being compensated to the extent of 
wages they would have earned had they 
not been called to attend court, and when 
no work is lost they be paid at the rate of 



184 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



$2.50 an hour for all time they were re- 
quired to be available, computed from the 
time they were required to report or dead- 
head. 

Under the present rule, an engineer in 
regularly assigned service or set up in pool 
service, who is called as a witness in court 
by the Company or before a coroner's in- 
quest in a case in which the Company is 
concerned, will be compensated to the ex- 
tent of wages which he would have earned 
except for his absence as a result of such 
call, and the engineer who is on the spare 
board and is called as a witness in like 
circumstances, if time is lost: 8 hours will 
be allowed per day of 24 hours at the rate 
of $1.85 an hour. 

Recommendation [Clause (f)] — The Board 
is of the view that the spare engineer 
should be paid for time lost on an hourly 
basis related to his daily basic pay in the 
last service he performed. In other words, 
if the last service he performed had a basic 
day rate of $19.55 and he were on duty 
at a coroner's inquest for an hour, he 
would receive $19.55 divided by eight, 
$2.45, and if his last service was at a 
higher rate he would receive an hourly rate 
based on his basic daily rate divided by 
eight 

The Board does not recommend that this 
provision should be extended to cover cases 
in which the engineer loses no wages. In 
such circumstances, although he must 
attend court by reason of being subpoenaed 
to an inquest or court, he actually receives 
reasonable expenses while away from home 
and is reasonably compensated in the 
Board's view for the time lost if he loses 
no work thereby. 

Clause (h). This proposal would amend 
Article 5, Clause (h) to provide payment 
when an engineer is required to set out or 
pick up unit or units for multiple service. 

Under the present rule governing pay- 
ments for the service of setting out and 
picking up diesel units en route, locomo- 
tive engineers receive payment only when 
they are required to make or break connec- 
tions between units and at points where 
shop staff is employed to perform the work 
involved in making or breaking connec- 
tions, the locomotive engineer is not paid 
the allowance specified, and the Brother- 
hood asserts even though the shop staff 
actually makes the connections, the engi- 
neer often is required to perform other 
functions which may include cutting out 
brake, setting rotor valve, setting engine 
control switch, removing control handles, 
closing unit doors and windows, etc. The 
Brotherhood also states that for these 



reasons it submits that there should be a 
payment of 30 minutes specified in the rule 
applying at all points where diesels are set 
out and picked up en route, as provided for 
in the rule as they suggest it should be 
amended. 

It will be noted that one of the Com- 
pany's proposals is that frs present pay- 
ments provided should be .Jeleted from the 
articles in the contract in both East and 
West regions. The Boarc was told that 
the present clause was written in as a result 
of negotiations in the 1959 settlement, and 
that the payments provided for by this rule 
apply when units are picked up or set out 
at intermediate points for traffic or operat- 
ing purposes requiring the making or break- 
ing of connections between the units by the 
engineer, but not if connections between 
the operating units of the locomotive con- 
sist are made or broken by shop staff per- 
sonnel or other employees assigned to per- 
form this service. An exception to the pay- 
ment where shop staff personnel did not 
perform the service, is that no payment is 
provided if the unit has to be set out or 
picked up because of mechanical failure. 

Recommendation [Clause (h)] — The Board 
is of the opinion that in this situation the 
engineers are requesting payment mostly in 
consideration of services performed by em- 
ployees other than themselves, and it does 
not feel justified in making the recommen- 
dation asked for. The Company's request is 
dealt with under Company proposals. 

VI— Article 6 
Clause (c) 

Amend rule to provide that diesel units in 
snow plow service will be equipped with dual 
cab heaters. 

Brotherhood's request No. 6 requesting 
Clause (c) of Article 6 be amended to 
provide that diesel units in snow-plow ser- 
vice will be equipped with dual cab heaters, 
has been dropped. 

VII— Article 7 
Clause (c) 

Increase wayfreight rate by $2.00 per 100 
miles. 

This proposal is that Article 7 be amended 
increasing the wayfreight rate by $2.00 per 
100 miles. Under the present wayfreight 
rule, regularly assigned engineers in way- 
freight service or through-freight engineers 
that qualify under the conversion rule, re- 
ceive $0.70 per 100 miles as payment over 
and above the basic freight rate applicable. 

The Brotherhood submits that when the 
differential for wayfreight service was first 
established, it amounted to 18 per cent of 
the basic freight rate in effect at that time, 
and that today's differential of $0.70 per 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



185 



mile represents less than 5 per cent of the 
basic freight rate calculated on the rate 
for one unit in freight service, and thus the 
Brotherhood argues that on the basis of 
the differential in 1902, it might well have 
requested a $3.00 differential today, but it 
asserts it is asking only $2.00 because it 
compares with the differential paid to road 
switcher assignments. 

The Company asserts that the wayfreight 
differential paid locomotive engineers was 
in recognition of longer hours on duty 
brought about by additional work handling 
less-than-carload-lot-freight and local switch- 
ing, and that in the past, it was not unusual 
for wayfreight crews to unload 10 to 20 
cars of less-than-carload-lot-freight during a 
trip, as well as perform switching at various 
stations along the line to set off, pick up or 
place cars for loading or unloading in car- 
load lots. 

The Company says that since 1920, less 
than carload-lot traffic has been greatly 
reduced and at the present time wayfreight 
seldom handle more than one car of less 
than carload lot traffic, and in some cases 
only part of a car. The Company also says 
that wayfreight and mixed-train crews 
handle a very small volume of l.c.l. freight, 
their main duties being spotting and switch- 
ing cars. The Board is satisfied that there 
has been a vast reduction in l.c.l. traffic and 
that this has resulted in the duties of crews 
in wayfreight and mixed train service being 
in the main confined to switching en route. 

Recommendation — The Board has come 
to the conclusion that wayfreight and mixed 
train service is not nearly as onerous and 
as time consuming and as irregular as it 
was in the past, and does not see fit to 
recommend that the Brotherhood's proposal 
be adopted by the carriers. 

VIII— Article 8 
Clause (a) 

Amend rule to allow for payment of all 
time occupied in work train service en route. 

New clause to provide that self-propelled 
cranes handling cars in work train service will 
be manned by locomotive engineer. 

The Brotherhood explains that this request 
is designed to compensate road engineers for 
all time occupied in work train service en 
route, and that since road engineers are 
paid on the basis of time or miles, which- 
ever is the greater, the performance of work- 
train service en route adds to the time 
required to complete a trip, and is outside 
of the trip called, and therefore some form 
of compensation should be paid for the 
time so occupied. 

The present rule provides that such an 
engineer will be paid for work train serv- 
ice en route when the time occupied ex- 



ceeds one hour. The Western rule provides 
for payment of all time held to perform 
work service en route, and is outside the 
work of the trip. The present rule allows 
the road engineer payment for work or 
wreck train en route when the time occupied 
exceeds one hour. 

The Company in dealing with this re- 
quest says the real purpose to be served 
by the provision for additional payment 
was to impose a penalty on the Company 
in circumstances where crews are delayed 
en route for unduly long periods as a re- 
sult of performing these services. 

Recommendation (Part 1, Proposal VIII) 
— The Board is of the opinion that the 
present rule provides adequate safeguards 
for the engineers and therefore does not 
recommend the change requested. 

The second part of the Brotherhood's 
proposal No. 8 is that a new clause be 
added to provide that the self-propelled 
cranes handling cars in work-train service 
will be manned by a locomotive engineer. 

This proposal is put forward by the 
Brotherhood to make sure that when cars 
are moved by means of propulsion other 
than locomotive that the engineer's rights 
to operate the means of propulsion are 
safeguarded. Self-propelled cranes are for 
specific work and they are operated quite 
differently from locomotives, and the Board 
does not feel there is any justification to 
recommend the adoption of the Brother- 
hood's proposal. 

Recommendation (Part 2, Proposal VIII) 
— The Board recommends that this proposal 
be not accepted. 

IX— Article 10 
Clause (a) 

Amend rule to allow away from home pay- 
ment after the expiration of 12 hours in place 
of 16 hours and provisions of rule to apply in 
assigned as well as unassigned service. 

The Brotherhood proposes that Article 10, 
Clause (a) be amended to allow away- 
from-home payment after expiration of 12 
hours in place of 16 hours and provisions 
of the rule to apply in assigned as well as 
unassigned service. 

The present clause provides that an 
engineer in pool freight and in unassigned 
service held at other than home terminal 
longer than 16 houres without being called 
for duty, will be paid minimum passenger 
rates on the basis of 12i miles per hour 
for the first 8 hours in each subsequent 24 
hours thereafter. 

The Brotherhood advances as its reason 
for requesting that the 16 hours be reduced 
to 12 hours, that the 16-hour provision is 



186 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



excessive and results, according to the 
Brotherhood's submission, in engineers being 
held away from home for longer periods 
than necessary, and that engineers held 
away from home are put to considerable 
expense and inconvenience for which the 
present rule does not adequately provide. 

The Brotherhood proposal would provide 
for away from home payment after the 
expiration of 12 hours in place of 16 hours 
and would apply the rule in assigned as well 
as unassigned service. The present rule in- 
sures that engineers receive at least one 
basic day's pay for each 24 hours held 
even although no work may be performed. 

The Company says that it does everything 
possible consistent with economy of opera- 
tion to return crews promptly to their home 
terminal, and in those instances where 
crews are held at away-from-home terminals 
a sufficient length of time to come within 
the provision of the present rule, it is due 
to some factor not resonably within the 
control of the Company, such as unbalanced 
flow of traffic, or serious interference with 
train movements because of weather or 
unusual conditions. It also states that the 
present rule provides a sufficient penalty to 
discourage any unreasonable delays and 
provides a protection to the employees 
against loss of earnings without involving a 
waste of transportation service. 

Recommendation — The Board is of the 
opinion that the Brotherhood is reasonably 
well protected under the present rule and 
recommends no change, except that the 
rule should provide that when assigned 
engineers are held away from the home 
terminal, except in cases of wrecks, snow 
blockages or washouts on the sub-division 
to which they are assigned, and when 
engineers on assigned runs are held away 
from home terminals waiting their trains, 
delayed beyond the advertised time of de- 
parture the engineers will be paid for the 
time so held if it is more than 7 hours. 
Seven hours or less not to count. If over 
7 hours the engineers to be paid twelve 
and one-half (12i) miles for each hour 
over the said 7 hours at minimum passenger 
rates for the first eight (8) hours in each 
subsequent twenty-four (24) hours so held. 
Time to be submitted on a separate time 
return. 

X— Article 11 

Amend the rule to provide that locomotive 
engineer will be employed to operate all forms 
of motive power in passenger, freight, yard 
and work-train service. 

The Brotherhood would add to the present 
rule the following words: 

"Whenever new forms of motive power are 
introduced in freight, passenger, yard, work- 



train or snow-plow service, position of engineer, 
operator or motorman will be filled from the 
seniority roster of the locomotive engineers." 

The Brotherhood says that recently ex- 
periments have been conducted with a dif- 
ferent class of motive power operating on 
rail, consisting of a tractor-trailer type of 
equipment in which flanges are placed on 
the wheels making the operation on railway 
tracks feasible. 

While the Company admits that experi- 
ments have been made with some other dif- 
ferent forms of motive power, it is the 
Board's understanding that no such tractor 
or motor-truck type of transport is likely to 
be introduced in the immediate future. 

Recommendation — There is still great un- 
certainty as to whether or not the Railway 
will introduce any other forms of motive 
power, and until the introduction of some 
different form of motor power becomes a 
practical and definite possibility, the Board 
does not see fit to recommend the adoption 
of the suggested amendment. 

XI— Article 12 

Add provision to prevent the operation of 
"A" and "B" diesel units backwards except in 
case of emergency or doubling grades. 

This proposal is to add a provision to 
Article 12 to prevent the operation of "A" 
and "B" diesel units backwards except in 
cases of emergency or doubling grades. The 
Brotherhood says that this rule is necessary 
as a safety measure, that diesel units are not 
designed to operate backwards in road 
service because the controls are located so 
that engineers must face forward to properly 
operate them, and that the Company has 
sometimes asked engineers to operate diesel 
units backwards for some considerable 
distance. 

Recommendation — The Board is of the 
view that the Company is safety conscious, 
and while the Board has some sympathy for 
the Brotherhood's request, it does not feel 
that it should recommend the incorporation 
in the contract of the clause suggested, but 
at the same time, it would like to point out 
to the Railway that in its opinion diesel 
"A" and "B" units should not be operated 
backwards in road service unless in very 
exceptional circumstances, and except in 
cases of emergency or in doubling grades or 
for other like reasons. 

XII— Article 16 

Section 1, Clause (d) 

Amend rule to provide 4 weeks vacation after 

25 years continuous service and 250 months of 

compensated service. 

Section 3 

Add clause to provide that time lost due to 
compensable injury will be considered as com- 
pensated service in the calculation of pay. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



187 



This proposal is to amend Section 1 
Clause (d) of Article 16 to provide 4 weeks 
vacation after 25 years continuous service 
and 250 months of compensated service, 
and to add another clause to Section 3 to 
provide that time lost due to compensable 
injury will be compensated service in the 
calculation of vacation pay. 

Recommendation — Under the recent non- 
operating employees collective agreement, 4 
weeks vacation after 25 years of continuous 
service was granted by the Company, and 
the Board is of the opinion that this request 
should be granted by the Company to the 
employees, but that the part of it which 
has to do with time lost as a result of com- 
pensable injury as compensated service 
should not be used in the calculation of 
vacation pay. The actual wording of this 
vacation clause should be left to the parties 
to work out between themselves. 

XIII— Article 19 
Clause (a) 

Add provision that investigation will be held 
at home terminal of engineer concerned. 
Clause (d) 

Amend rule to provide that engineer will not 
be dismissed or disciplined without a fair and 
impartial trial; will not be required to assume 
responsibility in his statement and will be noti- 
fied of the decision within 15 days of initial 
investigation. 

This proposal is divided into two parts. 
The first part is to amend Article 19 by 
adding a provision that investigation will be 
held at home terminal of engineer con- 
cerned, and the second part is to amend the 
rule to provide that the engineer will not 
be dismissed or disciplined without a fair 
and impartial trial, and will not be required 
to assume responsibility in his statement, 
and will be notified of the decision made 
within 15 days of the initial investigation. 

The Brotherhood says that sometimes an 
engineer has to travel up to 150 miles to 
reach the headquarter station where the in- 
vestigation takes place, and that such in- 
vestigation should be held at the home 
terminal. It also says that engineers should 
not be asked such a question as "Do you 
accept responsibility?", and that the rule 
should provide that decision would be ren- 
dered within 15 days after the investigation 
is held unless otherwise mutually agreed 
upon. 

The Board is told that this rule has been 
a rule standard both in the engineers' and 
the trainmen's rule, and that in 1960 in 
the trainmen's agreement the rule was 
amended by adding Clause (d), which 
read as follows: 

"An employee will not be disciplined or dis- 
missed until after an investigation has been 
held and until the employee's responsibility is 



established by assessing the evidence produced 
and no employee will be required to assume 
this responsibility in his statement or statements. 
An investigation shall be held and the employee 
advised in writing of the decision within 15 days 
of the time the report is rendered except as 
otherwise mutually agreed upon." 

Recommendation — The Board is of the 
opinion that the engineer's contract should 
contain a similar clause. The Board does 
not recommend the other changes requested 
by the Brotherhood in this rule. 

XIV— Article 20 

Amend the rule to read: Passenger trains 
handling piggyback cars will be considered as 
mixed-train service. 

The Brotherhood proposes that Article 20 
be amended to read: Passenger trains hand- 
ling piggyback cars will be considered as 
mixed-train service. This proposal has been 
dropped and therefore it is not necessary 
to report upon it. 

XV— Article 23 

Clause (a) 

Amend rule to allow engineer to book rest 
after the expiration of 8 hours on duty and be 
paid for time occupied travelling to objective 
terminal or provided with suitable sleeping 
accommodations at the point where rest is 
booked. 

Under this proposal the Brotherhood asks 
that Clause (a) of Article 23 be amended 
to allow an engineer to book rest after 
expiration of 8 hours on duty and be paid 
for time occupied travelling to objective 
terminal or be provided with suitable sleep- 
ing accommodation at the point where rest 
is booked. 

At the present time an engineer who has 
been on duty 12 hours or more will have 
the right to book rest at any point and the 
man is to be the judge of his condition. 
The Brotherhood submits that by reason of 
the exacting nature of locomotive engi- 
neers' duties, engineers should be allowed 
to book rest if their condition warrants it, 
and they should be the judge of that at 
the end of 8 hours on duty. 

The Brotherhood's view is that an engi- 
neer who is required to sit at the controls 
on his locomotive with his foot on the dead- 
man control, and at the same time be watch- 
ful of every movement of his engine and 
train, finds on occasion that he needs to 
book rest at the end of 8 hours, and that 
if that is so, he should have the right to 
do so. 

The second part of the Brotherhood's 
request is that the engineer be paid for 
time occupied travelling to the objective 
terminal or provided with suitable sleeping 
accommodation at the point where rest is 
booked. 



188 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



The Company contends that the present 
provision permitting engineers to take rest 
at any point after 12 hours or more on 
duty is fair and creates no hardship. It 
points out that the physical requirements 
of locomotive engineers have not increased, 
but with the advent of the diesel and vari- 
ous improvements in the engineer's posi- 
tion and with the introduction of many 
devices, the actual physical work of the 
engineer is much less onerous than that re- 
quired of him while operating under steam 
power. 

The Company points out that the pres- 
ent rule is intended to apply only when the 
physical condition of the man taking rest 
is such that he cannot carry on to the ter- 
minal, and that it was never intended or 
accepted that men who were physically fit 
to carry on would be permitted to take rest 
for the purpose of circumventing work still 
required to be done. Engineers sometimes 
work less than 8 hours before they are off 
duty and sometimes more, and the Com- 
pany contends that the existing arrange- 
ment is fair and equitable to all parties 
concerned. 

If the Brotherhood's demand were met, 
one man of a crew could tie up an entire 
crew without regard to the expense or loss 
to the Company and inconvenience to its 
customers. 

The Board of Transport Commissioners is 
empowered to make rules regulating the 
hours of work for railway employees, and 
if the Brotherhood could bring forth 
sufficient instances where an engineer, who 
entered upon his duty after proper rest, 
found that by reason of fatigue he re- 
quired to book rest after 8 hours and be- 
fore 12 hours, no doubt the Board of 
Transport Commissioners would make a 
ruling to meet the situation as it found it. 

The second part of the request is that 
the engineers be supplied with suitable 
sleeping accommodations at the point where 
rest is booked. This would mean if this 
request were met that the Company would 
have to supply or would have to be pre- 
pared to supply accommodation at almost 
every point on the system without knowing 
in advance where such point would be at 
which the engineer might decide to book 
rest. 

Recommendation — Engineers at present 
booking rest en route are permitted to 
travel to the terminal on their train or on 
the first passenger train. This seems reason- 
able. The Board does not recommend the 
acceptance of the suggested change either 
as to the reduction in hours in booking 
rest or as to the provision requested for 
supplying suitable accommodation at points 
where rest is booked. 



XVI— Article 25 
Clause (a) 

Amend rule to provide diesel units with 
suitable locker for storing clothing, elimination 
of diesel fumes and maintenance of weather 
stripping. 

New clause to provide for electric water 
coolers on diesel units. 

New clause to provide for the installation 
of bay windows and awnings on all diesel units 
employed in yard, wayfreight and road-switcher 
service. 

The next proposal of the Brotherhood is 
that Article 25 be amended in Clauses (a) 
and (d) as set out in the appendixes. The 
reason given by the Brotherhood for this 
requested amendment is that the present 
rules which were written for steam power 
are not applicable to present conditions, 
and it submits that with diesel locomotives, 
there is not adequate provision for storing 
the clothing. Further, that weather stripping 
on doors and windows becomes worn and 
missing, causing cold, drafty cabs, and that 
the admission of oil fumes from the en- 
gine causes embarrassment and fatigue, and 
that the heaters are not of sufficient capacity 
on some units, and that drinking water 
facilities are primitive. All of these things 
they want corrected, and that the new rule 
is designed to do this. 

Dealing with the part of the request 
which has to do with the lockers for storing 
clothing, the Company points out that most 
yard diesels are equipped with lockers for 
this purpose, but it is their experience even 
when so equipped they are not used, and 
as a result, the policy was changed so that 
coat hooks were put on in diesel cabs, and 
except for the inclusion of the request at 
this time of bargaining, the Company has 
had no other complaints concerning the 
arrangement. 

The Company says that occasionally there 
have been complaints about diesel exhaust 
fumes entering the operating cab, and when 
this has been brought to its attention, the 
condition has been remedied. The Com- 
pany also says that prior to the onset of 
winter weather, the regular staffs are aug- 
mented and cabs are winterized, and that 
they have had very few complaints in this 
connection. 

The Company also says that the request 
for supplying electric water coolers, if car- 
ried out over the whole system, would re- 
sult in the expenditure of approximately 
$450,000.00, and that the Company pres- 
ently supplies ice water in regularly steri- 
lized galvanized pails. 

The Brotherhood request for bay win- 
dows and awnings refers to diesel units in 
wayfreight and road-switcher service, 
where considerable switching is performed. 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 

53741-5—6 



189 



fhe Company says that bay windows and 
awnings are not necessary on the road 
diesel because the units already supply ex- 
cellent visibility front and rear. 

Recommendation — The Board is of the 
opinion that the improvements recom- 
mended by the Brotherhood, while desir- 
able, are of an expensive nature and should 
not presently be recommended. However, 
the Board does ask that the Company pay 
more attention to specific complaints when 
they are received and take corrective action 
to improve them. The Company might in- 
struct its local management personnel to 
forward these complaints to the head office. 
It would appear that some of the diffi- 
culties that have arisen have done so by 
reason of the man on the scene not passing 
on the complaints to people in higher man- 
agement positions in the Company. 

XVII— Article 26 

New rule to define duties of an engineer. 

New rule to provide that regularly assigned 
engineer will receive at least 24 hours notice of 
cancellation of assignment or be paid 100 
miles for each day lost. 

The Brotherhood proposes a new rule 
to define the duties of an engineer and a 
new rule to provide that regularly assigned 
engineers receive at least 24 hours notice of 
cancellation of assignment or be paid 100 
miles for day lost. 

The engineers' committee feels that since 
any present rules or booklets relating to 
the duties of engineers were prepared and 
promulgated primarily to relate to steam 
locomotives, that the various items relating 
to the duties of a locomotive engineer 
which are found in different places should 
be combined under one article and written 
into the collective agreement. 

The Board understands that engineers' 
duties for the different classes of service 
may be quite different, and it would be 
difficult to write a rule to define all the 
duties. The very definition of duties might 
be interpreted so as to restrict or avoid 
work which had never been intended or 
contemplated, although it might not be 
specifically spelled out in the duties as 
defined. 

Recommendation — The Board does not 
see fit to recommend that a rule be written 
to outline in detail the duties of a locomo- 
tive engineer. 

Part 2 — Proposal XVII. The Brother- 
hood's request for a new rule covering can- 
celling of assignments is to protect an as- 
signed locomotive engineer from loss of 
time due to short notice being received that 
his assigned job or run has been cancelled. 



The Company points out that cancellation 
of assignments usually results from two 
causes: (1) an emergency situation where 
no operation can be performed and advice 
of cancellation depends on the cause of 
emergency, or (2) where an assignment 
is not warranted, in which case advance 
notice is given. 

Recommendation — The Board does not 
recommend that a rule be written as the 
Brotherhood suggests, but it is of the 
opinion that the Company might well give 
a letter to the Brotherhood advising the 
Brotherhood that it would give 24 hours 
advance notice of cancellation of assign- 
ment whenever possible. 

XVIH—New Rule 

The Brotherhood proposes to have a 
new rule written into the contract covering 
rest-house conditions and maintenance. The 
rule respecting work trains, sleeping 
quarters, as suggested reads as follows: 

Requested Rule or Amendment 

Clause (a) Engineer who has been on duty 
eight (8) hours or more will have the right to 
book rest at any point, the man to be judge 
of his own condition, 8 hours rest to be con- 
sidered sufficient except in extreme cases. It is 
understood that in the event of an engineer 
having to tie up between terminals and ask for 
relief owing to excess time on duty, he will be 
furnished transportation and allowed to travel 
to terminal on his train or first passenger 
train, if more preferable to him, and be com- 
pensated as in continuous service until arrival 
at objective terminal. 

Note. In the event an engineer books rest 
between terminals and is supplied with proper 
sleeping accommodation, payment for his trip 
will be on a continuous-time basis less time of 
rest booked. 

The Brotherhood says that at the present 
time the contract contains no adequate 
provision covering the matter of sleeping 
quarters for locomotive engineers when tied 
up away from their home terminal. It 
asserts that while rest-house accommoda- 
tion is being provided by the Company, 
there is nothing in the collective agreement 
which makes it a requirement for the 
Company to do so except as stipulated in 
Article 8(f) of the Atlantic & Eastern 
Regions schedule and Article 8(h) of the 
Prairie and Pacific Regions schedule which 
pertains to engineers assigned to work train 
service. This rule reads as follows: 

"Suitable sleeping accommodation, including 
pillows, blankets, mattresses, will be provided 
for an engineer on work train. Engineer on 
work-train service when laid up at other than 
terminal will be paid continuous time if sleep- 
ing accommodation is not provided." 



190 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE 9 FEBRUARY 7962 



Recommendation — The Board recom- 
mends that a rule be worked out between 
the parties covering rest houses, and that 
such rule be incorporated in the contract. 
The Board does not, however, recommend 
that the sleeping quarters should be separ- 
ately provided for engineers, and in fact, 
such sleeping quarters might well be pro- 
vided in motels, hotels, or other suitable 
places. 

The wording of the rule as recommended 
should be carefully worked out, and while 
protecting the men so they will have com- 
fortable and sanitary quarters, the Company 
should be given the widest possible latitude 
as to the place of the quarters and the 
nature of the accommodation, that is, 
whether it is private or public accom- 
modation. 

XIX— New Rule 

The next Brotherhood proposal is that 
there should be a rule introduced to pro- 
vide for statutory holidays to locomotive 
engineers in all classes of service. The rule 
should follow the general pattern of the 
master agreement for statutory holidays 
for non-operating trades. 

The Brotherhood submits that the Com- 
pany should extend to all engineers similar 
statutory holiday provisions as they pres- 
ently extend to engineers in yard service, 
and in support of its contention, it states 
that road engineers wish to enjoy holidays 
with their families as much as any other 
citizen, and when deprived of the right 
to do so should be compensated for loss 
in manner similar to that of yard men and 
those employees in the non-operating group. 
The Brotherhood submitted certain statisti- 
cal material to show how common statu- 
tory holiday provisions are in industrial 
contracts. 

The Company on the other hand points 
out that although agreements for non- 
operating employees have contained clauses 
giving them premium payment for work 
performed on certain statutory holidays for 
many years, such provisions have not until 
recently been applied to any of the running 
trades, and then only in 1957 was statutory 
holiday pay provided for engineers in yard 
service. 

The Company points out that in outside 
industry, the requirement of working on a 
statutory holiday is at the discretion of the 
employer, and can be related directly to 
expectation of profit arising from the extra 
work performed, and that even in yard 
service some reductions can be made in 
yard assignments on statutory holidays due 
to the local businesses closing down. 

THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 

53741-5—6* 



The Company asserts that since, under 
its charter, accommodation for all traffic 
must be provided without delay and with 
due care and diligence, that trains must be 
operated around the clock, 7 days a week, 
and that this fact is recognized in the exist- 
ing rates of pay; that to suspend train 
movements on statutory holidays would 
cause a serious dislocation because of delays 
to traffic, deterioration of perishable goods 
and inconvenience to many. 

Also, since statutory-holiday work is 
primarily a penalty payment to minimize 
and eliminate work on the day on which 
the penalty applies, and since this cannot be 
done owing to the nature of the Railway's 
operation, there is no need for such pro- 
vision in the contract, as it would amount 
simply to a penalty provision which would 
add remuneration for no service performed. 
No other branch of the operating service 
other than the yard engineers receive 
statutory holiday pay. 

Recommendation — As the average time 
worked of both freight and passenger engi- 
neers is less than 40 hours a week, there is 
less need for an allowance for statutory 
holidays, and in view of the recommenda- 
tions for increase in basic wages herein- 
after made, the Board does not see fit to 
recommend the change requested by the 
engineers. 

XX— New Rule 

The next proposal of the engineers is 
that a new rule be added to provide pay- 
ment for a locomotive engineer required 
to operate a locomotive equipped with radio 
telephone. This the engineers say is based 
on the principle that such service does not 
fall within the normal scope of the duties 
of a locomotive engineer, and if he is to 
use radio telephone, his productivity and 
efficiency is thereby increased and it should 
be compensated for by a premium payment 
of $1.00 per trip. 

The Company says that radio equipment 
is provided to bring about more efficient 
operation by enabling instructions to be 
transmitted more expeditiously and clearly, 
and that the equipment is installed at the 
Company's expense and that any increase 
in efficiency or safety is attributable di- 
rectly as a result of additional capital in- 
vestment, rather than a change in the 
engineers' function. 

The Company says that communications 
have always been of importance and con- 
cern to locomotive engineers as well as 
to all members of the running trades and 
that they have always had communication 
responsibility, and that the use of radio is 



191 



simply a substitute for duties that have 
been more onerous and unpleasant and 
unreliable in the past, and that their use 
simply benefits engineers by making their 
work safter and more comfortable. The 
request amounts to a request for an in- 
crease in compensation for which no addi- 
tional service is rendered or no additional 
work performed. 

Recommendation — The Board is of the 
opinion that an engineer has responsibility 
for communication with the use of various 
flags, flares and signals and the use of a 
radio facility is only an extension of these 
responsibilities, and does not change his 
function, and the Board is of the opinion 
that the use of radio facility may in some 
instances make this function of the engi- 
neers easier and more comfortable to per- 
form. For these reasons it would recom- 
mend against the acceptance of the Brother- 
hood's proposal. 

XXI— New Rule 

The next Brotherhood proposal is to 
introduce a rule for the payment of wages 
every second Thursday. While if this were 
practical it would be an advantage to the 
engineers, the demand does present practical 
problems for the Railway, and a similar 
request was put forward by the non-operat- 
ing groups in 1958, and as a result of a 
study by committee representatives of both 
parties, it was found that the implementa- 
tion of the request was impractical and it 
was later withdrawn. 

Recommendation — Since this schedule of 
payment does not apply to any other Rail- 
way employees, the Board does not see fit 
to recommend that it be applied to the 
engineers. 

XXII— New Rule 

The Brotherhood proposes a new rule 
to provide engineers for compensation for 
loss incurred in the sale of their property 
and expenses in connection with moving 
personal effects when required to relocate 
their residence as a result of change in 
terminals. 

The engineers point ou tthat terminal 
points have been established and designated 
by the Company, and following the estab- 
lishment and designation of terminals, engi- 
neers have been required to establish their 
homes at work out of such designated 
points, and that during the course of time 
locomotive engineers have bought or built 
homes and contributed to the building up 
of a community in which they were ex- 
pected to live. 



The Brotherhood says that as a result 
of "dieselization" many services that were 
necessary when steam locomotives were 
used are not necessary now. There has 
been a discontinuance of water tanks, coal 
chutes, ice pits, round houses and cutting 
down of shop staffs, and sometimes one 
locomotive engineer now performs work 
previously requiring several to do, and 
because of the advantages of the new in- 
novations in motive power employees who 
are required to move their families away 
from the homes they have spent many 
years to acquire, and away from the social 
life they have established, and the many 
municipal improvements they have helped 
to pay for, should be protected against 
losses in the event of the sale of their homes 
or moving away when the exigencies of 
the operation require them to change their 
place of residence. 

The wording of the new rule that the 
Brotherhood proposes may be found on 
Page 5 of the Company brief and starts 
out as follows: 

"When a locomotive engineer is forced to 
move from a home terminal to exercise his 
seniority to enable him to work because of 
management's desire to run trains two sub- 
divisions or through existing home terminals, 
(existing home terminals to mean home 
terminals existing in 1957) or through former 
turn-around points. Such locomotive engineers 
must bo compensated for the moving of house- 
hold effects and further, must be compensated 
for any monetary loss from the sale of homes. 

The cost of such homes to be determined 
on the value of the current condition of the 
homes had such homes been offered for sale 
2 years prior to the notification of change in 
operation. The home to be defined as meaning 
the house, property the house stands on, the 
garage and necessary outbuildings and the 
property that such garage or outbuildings stand 
on. It to be understood that any locomotive 
engineer who has already suffered a loss because 
of the running of crews through home terminals 
or two sub-divisions, that this article of the 
contract be retroactive." 

Management in reply says that as far as 
the agreement is concerned, management's 
rights are unrestricted in the matter of 
extending runs or changing terminals, and 
that the rule which has been in force 
since 1959, Article 26, Clause 1, amply 
protects the Brotherhood to the point of 
providing for impartial arbitration if agree- 
ment cannot be arrived at concerning the 
establishment or the changing of home 
terminals. 

Recommendation — The Board is aware 
of the fact that by reason of "dieselization" 
and changing schedules and terminals, many 
employees may be uprooted. However, it 
takes note of the fact that recently the 
Minister of Transport announced that this 
v/hole problem would be referred to a 



192 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 7962 



legislative committee of the House of Com- 
mons at the next session of the Federal 
Parliament. 

No doubt this committee will go into 
every aspect of the matter and make a 
report thereon. In the meantime, the 
Board of Conciliation feels that the present 
arrangement should not be disturbed and 
therefore it recommends that the Brother- 
hood's request as outlined in its proposals 
be not granted in the forthcoming contract. 
The Board does not wish in any way to 
influence what the committee might decide. 

XXIII — Separate Proposal Offer to Prairie 
& Pacific Regions Only 

The Brotherhood proposes that under 
Article 2 of the Prairie and Pacific Regions, 
Road Service, they wish the rule to read 
20 miles per hour where 12i miles per 
hour and 15 miles per hour now appear. 
The engineers explain that under the present 
rule, a passenger engineer working between 
certain points specified in the said rule 
is paid at the rate of 15 miles per hour for 
preparatory and initial time, and if the 
time on duty exceeds the road miles divided 
by 20, miles per hour overtime and final 
terminal time is paid at 12i miles per hour. 

This the engineers say means that an 
engineer takes reduction in pay for final 
delay and overtime. Engineers submit that 
since mountain differential was reduced to 
$1.00 per 100 miles in passenger service, 
that it is only reasonable to expect that 
20 miles per hour in initial and final termi- 
nal time should be paid as now applicable 
in all other passenger service in that 
region. 

Recommendation — One of the Company 
proposals is to eliminate initial and final 
terminal delay time and hereinafter the 
Board has reported against the acceptance 
by the Brotherhood of such proposal at 
this time. On the other hand, it does not 
feel that it should increase the payment 
for initial and final terminal-delay time 
even in the Western region. Therefore, the 
Board recommends that no change at 
present be made in this rule. 

XXIV— Article 2, Clause R 

"Freight engineer held 2 hours or over to 
load or unload stock, will be paid for all time 
so held at freight rate, each 5 minutes to 
count as one mile. This time not to be included 
in computing overtime." 

The next proposal put forward by the 
Prairie and Pacific Regions engineers is 
that engineers in freight and wayfreight or 
mixed-train service held to unload or load 
stock will be paid for all time so held at 
the freight rate applicable, each 5 minutes 



to count as one mile. At the present time 
engineers in freight, wayfreight and mixed- 
train service held 2 hours or over to load 
or unload stock will be paid for all time 
at the applicable rate to the class of service, 
each 5 minutes to count a mile. This request 
is put forward to compensate road engineers 
for all time occupied in loading and un- 
loading stock en route. 

The Company says that the engineers 
are adequately provided for by the dual 
basis of pay structure, which provides for 
payment for the trip as a whole on the 
basis of miles or hours, whichever produced 
the greater payment, and the purposes of 
the additional payment when time occupied 
in this service exceeds 2 hours, is to impose 
a penalty upon the Company in circum- 
stances where crews were delayed for un- 
duly long periods as a result of performing 
these services. 

The Company proposes that this guarantee 
for payment if engineers are delayed en 
route more than 2 hours and doing loading 
or unloading stock, to have this provision 
taken out of the contract, and later in this 
report the Board reports against the dele- 
tion of the provision of this rule regard- 
ing certain penalty payments. 

Recommendations — Under all the cir- 
cumstances the Board does not see fit 
to recommend the adoption of the Brother- 
hood's proposal for the payment of all 
time taken to load or unload stock. 

XIV — Prairie & Pacific Regions: Proposal 
of Amendments to Rules 

The next proposal is that the yard engi- 
neer will be allowed 20 minutes for lunch 
between 4 and 5 hours after starting work, 
without deduction in pay, and that the yard 
engineer will not be required to work longer 
than 5 hours without being allowed 20 
minutes for lunch and with no deduction 
in pay or time therefor. 

Under this request the Brotherhood 
wants to reduce the time an engineer eats, 
from 54- to 5 hours after starting work. The 
Board is of the opinion that to reduce the 
waiting time from 5i to 5 hours before 
the yard engineer is allowed to take lunch 
is simply a restriction on railway opera- 
tion for which there is no great need. 

Recommendation — The Board therefore 
recommends that this request be not 
granted. 

Company Proposals 

Atlantic & Eastern Regions, Prairie & 
Pacific Regions 

The Company requests that a rule be 

established to provide for payment of 



THE LABOUR GAZETTE • FEBRUARY 1962 



193 



actual miles or actual time on duty, which- 
ever is the greater, calculated from time 
required to report for duty until released 
from duty on the basis of 121 miles per 
hour in freight service and in short-run 
and short turn-around passenger service 
and 20 miles per hour in passenger service 
and eliminate all agreements, rules, regu- 
lations, interpretations or practices, how- 
ever established, in conflict therewith, 
such as: 

Article 2, Clause (a). Initial and final time- 
passenger service. 

Clause (c). Short turn-around service. 

Clauses (g), (h) and (i). Preparatory, initial 
and final terminal time in assigned pusher 
service. 

Clauses (o), (p) and (q). Switching at junc- 
tion, terminal at turn-around points. 

Clause (r). Loading and unloading stock. 

Article 3, Clauses (a), (b), (c) and (d). 
Preparatory time, initial and final terminal time. 

Article 4, Clause (k). Preparatory and final 
time — yard service. 

Article 5, Clause (g). Picking up and setting 
out diesel units en route. 

Article 6, Clause (a). Plowing out side 
tracks. 

Article 7, Clause (e). Unloading coal at 
water tanks. 

Article 8, Clause (a), (b), (c) and (j). 
Work train service. 

Article 12, Clause (b) and (c). Doubling. 

Article 14. Running off main line. 

Article 15. Hostling, 
. . . and similar articles in the Atlantic and 
Eastern Region. 

This request of the Company is a very 
far reaching one and seeks to eliminate 
the payment of any arbitraries. The Board 
will deal with them in the order in which 
they appear on the requests, and the first 
one is for the elimination of preparatory 
time. 

Preparatory time is now fixed by recent 
agreement at 15 minutes, and as this came 
about as a result of negotiations within the 
last few years, and since there has be